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Information on Website Accessibility

People with disabilities should not be excluded from all the benefits the Internet has to offer. This is especially relevant for students with disabilities who would like to enroll in online courses. One of the benefits of distance education is that it allows students with disabilities and students who experience difficulty commuting to classes the ability to take courses online while at home. However, this convenience can easily turn into a problem for students with disabilities if the online classes are not accessible.

In general all images should have alt text, form fields should be labeled correctly, and focus outlines should be shown for keyboard navigation. Also, correct header order should be followed, proper contrast ratio should be used (of at least 4.5:1 for normal text and 3:1 for large text), and videos should be captioned, and/or audio clips should have transcripts. More information about techniques and WCAG 2.0 Guidelines can be found here.

A good list of resources to help you identify and fix problems can be found here.

WordPress Accessibility

Websites made with WordPress are quickly becoming the new standard for content management and web design. This is due, in part, to the ease in which individuals with little to no coding knowledge can create and edit content using WordPress's powerful tools. However, while WordPress sites may look flashy, they often require additional work to make them accessible. WordPress offers many first and third party themes that make your site look flashy, but aren't always accessible. If you purchase a theme, make sure it is accessible first. If you can't find accessibility information, email the developer of the theme.

Here you will find tools to assist in making your WordPress site more accessible to all who may view your site.

Drupal Accessibility

As with WordPress, Drupal sites often require additional work to make them accessible. Drupal also offers many first and third party themes that make your site look flashy, however they aren't always accessible. If you purchase a theme, make sure it is accessible first. If you can't find accessibility information, email the developer of the theme.

Here you will find tools to assist in making your Drupal site more accessible to all who may view your site.

Google Sites

Google Sites is a WYSIWYG editor that can be used to create simple web pages through the Google's GSuite of software. Web pages created with Google Sites are largely not accessible. However, there are some steps that you can take to make your Google Site as accessible as possible:

  • Include alt text for images
  • Organize your site using proper heading order <h1> through <h4>
  • Use a color contrast ratio of 4.5:1 for large text and 7:1 for other text and images
  • Use informative link text
  • Use large, left-aligned text when possible
  • Use numbered and bulleted lists
  • Use a theme that allows you to see the focus outline as you tab through links on the site

For information on how to perform these tasks in Google Sites, please check out Google's help article.