University of Hawaii at Manoa Army ROTC
The Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program provides full-time college students the opportunity to pursue a commission in the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Reserve, or the Hawai'i Army National Guard. Officers may be commissioned on active duty, in a reserve component while pursuing a civilian career, or receive an education delay to earn a graduate or professional degree. Four-year, three-year, and two-year programs are available.

THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM

The four-year program is divided into a two-year basic and two-year advanced course. The basic course is for students who enter ROTC in their freshman year. With approval, students may enter ROTC in their sophomore year and compress the basic course requirements. This traditional program offers a moderately paced course of military and academic training resulting in completion of ROTC and eligibility for a commission on graduation day. All basic courses are electives, and no obligations are incurred. The advanced course includes a five-week summer camp between the junior and senior years held at Fort Lewis, Washington. Pay for the advanced course is $450-500 per month during the school year and approximately $900 plus free room and board for the five weeks at camp. To be eligible for the advanced course, a student must (a) be a U.S. citizen or U.S. national, (b) successfully complete the basic course or its equivalent, and (c) meet other statutory and regulatory requirements.

The two-year advanced program can be taken without the basic course by students who attend and complete a four-week summer camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky, for which the student receives approximately $600. Likewise, veterans of all services, three-year JROTC graduates, and national guardsmen and reservists may be exempt from the basic course. Should an individual qualify, select, and complete this option, he or she is eligible to receive a commission upon graduation. Students must have four semesters of college work remaining after finishing the basic summer camp (or qualifying for the exemptions). Advanced course students must have completed 60 credits and be full-time students.

In addition to the courses summarized in the course descriptions, cadets will be required to meet professional military education requirements prior to graduation and commissioning. This requirement consists of one course in military history.

OPTIONAL PROGRAMS

ARMY RESERVE/ARMY NATIONAL GUARD MEMBERSHIP

The Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP) allows cadets to participate in and receive drill pay from an Army Reserve or Hawai'i National Guard unit as an officer trainee while they complete the Army ROTC advanced course. The pay such cadets receive is in addition to the monthly ROTC spending allowance and any GI Bill educational benefits to which they are entitled.

SCHOLARSHIPS

Four, three, and two-year scholarships are available. All Army ROTC scholarships are merit based and cover the full tuition and fees for any university on Oahu. In addition, scholarships provide $1,200 per year for books and an additional $300-$500 per month spending allowance. Four-year applications are due by January 10 of the high school senior year. Three and two-year scholarships are competed for on campus by current ROTC students.











MSL 101 Introduction to Military Science I

Provides an initial glimpse of the military and the role that it plays in society. Develops the student's comprehension of the American defense system as it evolved as the result of changes in the American society. Typical subjects include ethics, leadership, effective goal setting, managing time and effort, and the tradition of a citizens' army.

MSL 101L - Introduction to Military Science I Lab (1) Practical application in adventure training, one-rope bridges, rifle marksmanship, land navigation, drill and ceremonies, physical training. Prerequisite: MSL 101 (or concurrent).

MSL 102 - Introduction to Military Science II (2)

Continuation of 101. Provides instruction in military-related subjects of general student interest, i.e., confidence-building field trips, supervising an individual exercise program, development of individual soldiering skills, and leadership and professional ethics for the military. Introduction to armed forces evolvements, overview of the Department of Defense, application of force in international relations.

MSL 102L - Introduction to Military Science II Lab (1)

Practical application in adventure training, one-rope bridges, rifle marksmanship, land navigation, drill and ceremonies, physical training. Prerequisite: MSL 102 (or concurrent).








MSL 201 - Intermediate Military Science I (3)
MSL 201/202 is open to all and does not require Instructor Approval!

Basic concepts of military leadership. Familiarization with the concept of leadership, the five of leadership power, the decision-making process, and the styles of leadership. Involves military skills and related adventure-type training and basic individual survival skills. Leadership laboratory required 1.5 hours per work, consisting of practical application of leadership skills, drill and ceremonies,land navigation, first aid, andarmy physical fitness training. Restriction: Instructor Approval.

MSL 202 - Intermediate Military Science II (3)

Individual and small-unit military skills. Practical applications include combat first aid; basic wilderness survival skills; land navigation; and a knowledge of key military jobs, duties, and responsibilities. Involves field training to provide hands-on experience. Leadership laboratory required 1.5 hours per week, consisting of practical application of leadership skills, drill and ceremonies, land navigation, first aid, and army physical fitness training. Restriction: Instructor Approval.








MSL 301 - Leading Small Organizations I (4)

(2.5 hour Lecture, 1.5 hour Lab) Series of practical opportunities to lead small groups and receive personal assessments and encouragement. Uses small unit defensive tactics and opportunities to plan/conduct training. Includes field training sessions, student taught classes, and presentations/briefings. Prerequisite: MSL 101, 102, 201, and 202; and Instructor consent. Restriction: Department Approval.

MSL 302 - Leading Small Organizations II (4)

(2.5 hour Lecture, 1.5 hour Lab) Analyze tasks and prepare written or oral guidance for team members to accomplish tasks. Delegate tasks and supervise. Examine and apply lessons from leadership case studies. Examine importance of ethical decision-making. Includes field training session, student taught classes, and presentations/briefings. Prerequisite: MSL 101, 102, 201, 202, and 301; and Instructor consent. Restriction: Department Approval.

Hooah ROTC

MSL 303 - ROTC Advanced Camp (6)

Six-week summer field training exercise conducted at Ft. Lewis, Washington. Arduous and intensified leadership training is conducted throughout the six-week period. Required for U.S. Army commissioning. Prerequisite: MSL 301, 302, and consent.









MSL 401 - Leadership Challenges and Goal Setting (4)

(2.5 hour Lecture, 1.5 hour Lab) Plan, conduct and evaluate activities of the ROTC cadet organization. Assess organizational cohesion and develop strategies to improve it. Develop confidence in skills to lead people and manage resources. Includes field training sessions, student taught classes and presentations/briefings. Prerequisite: 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302; and consent. Restriction: Department Approval.

MSL 401 - Leadership Challenges and Goal Setting (4)

(2.5 hour Lecture, 1.5 hour Lab) Continues the methodology from MSL 401. Identify and resolve ethical dilemmas. Refine counseling and motivating techniques. Examine aspects of tradition and law as related to leading as an officer in the Army. Prepare for a future as a successful Army officer. Includes field training sessions, student taught class and presentations/briefings. Prerequisite: 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302, 401; and consent. Restriction: Department Approval.






MISCELLANEOUS

MSL 100 - Introduction to Physical Fitness (1)

MSL 100 cannot be registered for and taken for a grade if you are a MSIII or MSIV.  If you do sign up for it separately you will receive an “F”!
Hands-on participatory course following the Army's physical fitness program. Classes conducted three days per week with Army ROTC cadets. Focus is on aerobic conditioning, muscular strength and endurance. Repeatable 3 times. A-F only. Co-requisite: MSL 101 or 102 or 201 or 202.

MSL 101L/102L (1)

Both 101L/102L requires that you be registered for 101/102 at the time of taking the lab.  You CANNOT take the lab after the fact.

MSL 203 - ROTC Basic Camp (6)

Six-week summer course conducted at Ft. Knox, Kentucky. Substitutes for ROTC basic course (MSL 101, 102, 201, and 202) and fulfills course require for admission to ROTC advanced courses. Credit will be given for MSL 203 or basic courses, but not both. Prerequisite: consent.

MSL 391 - History of Military Warfare (3) - Writing Intensive

Lecture/discussion on the art and science of warfare throughout history. A-F only. Prerequisite: consent.

MSL 399 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Limited to military science students who have had at least one previous military science course for which a grade of B or higher was earned and cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better. Prerequisite: consent.