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CURRENT + UPCOMING PROGRAMS


CURRENT EVENTS

SPRING 2017

Jelly Beans-E  WHORL / JACQUELINE RUSH LEE
Installation on view September 6, 2016 – September 6, 2017

Jelly Beans-S  WAIKIKI PARC FEATURES MOMOE NAKAJIMA
June 8 – September 14, 2017 / Waikiki Parc Gallery

Jelly Beans-E  BEAUTY OF MOKUHANGA: DISCIPLINE & SENSIBILITY
木版画の美:修練と感性

August 21 – October 1, 2017 / The Art Gallery

Jelly Beans-E  
ISOTOPIC PACIFICA, STEFANE PERRAUD COLLABORATION WITH ARAM KEBABDJIAN
October 22 – December 1, 2017 / The Art Gallery

Jelly Beans-E  
HARRY TSUCHIDANA: WORKS ON PAPER
January 16 – February 16, 2018 / The Art Gallery

Jelly Beans-E  
2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018 / The Art Gallery

Jelly Beans-E  
2018 BFA EXHIBITION
April 22 – May 11, 2018 / The Art Gallery


WAIKIKI PARC FEATURES MOMOE NAKAJIMA

Jelly Beans-S  SATELLITE

MOMOE NAKAJIMA at WAIKIKI PARC GALLERY
June 8 – September 14, 2017
Public Reception: Thursday, June 8, 2017 / 6–8pm

Momoe Nakajima’s sculptures are highlighted as part of an expanded arts partnership of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM), the Halekulani and its sister hotel, the Waikiki Parc.

Momoe Nakajima, a Hawai‘i-based artist, is inspired by her connections to Japan and Hawai‘i. She states, “As the saying goes, ‘Home is where the heart is.’ Being born in Japan, yet raised in Hawai‘i, this sentiment holds special relevance. The distance between me and my Japanese heritage has grown, and while at times I experienced feelings of rootlessness, I’ve come to identify Hawai‘i as my home.”

Her recent works include several pairs of a ceramic figure and a jar. The jar accompanies and grounds the figure while providing guidance like an ‘aumakua, a Hawaiian personal or family god. Each pair reflects its bond through matching surface designs that feature plants and flowers from Japan and Hawai‘i. For Nakajima, they represent home, old and new, and past and present, as she continues to explore and define where she belongs.

Nakajima, the recipient of a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the Department of Art + Art Historyv, UHM (2017), concurrently attended both UHM and Windward Community College (WCC). Although the commute was sometimes challenging, she is proud to call both campuses “her school.” Since 2014 she has held two art-related jobs at WCC—kiln and glaze technician at the ceramics studio and exhibition installation assistant at Gallery ‘Iolani.

In 2017 Nakajima was honored with the UHM Ceramic Faculty Book award. Her artwork has been presented at The Art Gallery, UHM, in SYSTEMS: 2017 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition; and at Gallery ‘Iolani, WCC, in Confluence 4, (2016); Ka Waiwai Mohala, (2014); and Confluence 3, (2011).

Guitarist Christopher Hopper will provide music at the opening reception in this series of up-and-coming young artists’ exhibitions at the Waikiki Parc. Hopper studied guitar with Nā Hōkū Hanohano Awards finalist Ian O’Sullivan and ukulele under Dr. Byron Yasui. In 2016, he received a Bachelor of Music degree in performance from the Department of Music, UHM. He has also studied with guitar virtuosos Carlos Barbosa Lima, and the Brazilian Guitar Duo’s Douglas Lora and João Luiz. The recipient of a full scholarship in 2014, Hopper attended Benjamin Verdery’s master class where he studied with Verdery, professor of guitar from Yale University, and Grammy Award-winning guitarist John Dearman from the Los Angeles Guitar Quartet (LAGQ). In 2015 Hopper was invited again to attend the master class, which featured former LAGQ member and founder Andrew York. An occasional performer at Hy’s Steakhouse, Hopper teaches guitar and ukulele to 20 students each week.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History, College of Arts + Humanities, and Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa

ADDRESS, HOURS + ADMISSION
Parc Promenade Gallery, Waikiki Parc Hotel Lobby
2233 Helumoa Road, Honolulu
Daily hotel hours / Free admission
Complimentary parking with hotel validation

Image:
Momoe Nakajima
Put Down Roots, 2017 (detail)
stoneware
Photographer: Chris Rohrer


BEAUTY OF MOKUHANGA: DISCIPLINE & SENSIBILITY

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

BEAUTY OF MOKUHANGA: DISCIPLINE & SENSIBILITY
木版画の美:修練と感性

August 21 – October 1, 2017
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

EVENTS
free and open to the public

Sunday, October 1 / The Art Gallery
3:00–5:00 p.m. Closing reception

The juried international exhibition Beauty of Mokuhanga: Discipline & Sensibility celebrates the Third International Mokuhanga Conference, which is being held outside of Japan for the first time. Mokuhanga, a traditional Japanese woodblock printing technique, is widely recognized through ukiyo-e prints that were popular during the Edo period (1603–1868).

The conference, scheduled for September 28 – October 1 at the Hawaii Imin International Conference Center, nurtures the discipline of mokuhanga and its special sensibilities, and also fosters its innovative uses.

Featuring 100 mokuhanga prints and hand-printed artists’ books by 68 artists from around the world, this exhibition presents the history of mokuhanga, and promotes the study, practice, and appreciation of mokuhanga printmaking in the global art community.

Gallery hours:
Mon.–Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed: Saturdays; Labor Day, Sept. 4.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated. Parking fees may apply.


ISOTOPIC PACIFICA, STEFANE PERRAUD COLLABORATION WITH ARAM KEBABDJIAN

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

Isotopic Pacifica, Stéfane Perraud
 Collaboration with Aram Kebabdjian
October 22 – December 1, 2017
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Special events:
All events are free and open to the public.

Sunday, October 22
2:00–3:00 p.m., Gallery walk-through with Stéfane Perraud
3:00–5:00 p.m., Opening reception

Tuesday, October 24
3:00–4:00 p.m., Gallery walk-through with Stéfane Perraud

Thursday, October 26
4:30–6:00 p.m., Public lecture by Stéfane Perraud, Art Building, Room 101

The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM) presents a contemporary art exhibition that highlights the collaboration of French artist Stéfane Perraud and writer Aram Kebabdjian and their recent work in the Pacific islands.

Isotopia is a fictional volcanic island invented by trans-media artist Stéfane Perraud and writer/collaborator Aram Kebabdjian. They describe an island with a military base somewhere between the 62nd and 63rd parallels—far from the normal sea routes—and populated by a few scientists, inhabitants, and a few visionaries. Perraud and Kebabdjian first explored this mirage in 2014 during an exhibition in La Malterie, in Lille, France. At the Galerie de Roussan, Paris, 2015, they hunted for isotopes on Isotopia.

In October 2017, the duo intends to investigate the possible links between Isotopia and the Hawaiian Islands. Perraud and Kebabdjian employ literary and sculptural machines that depict the immense power of the isotope and the legacy of the development of modern nuclear energy. Faux artifacts of the Cold War tests and secret bases in the Pacific are presented as clues to nefarious military operations—lost fleets of secret submarines, errant nuclear missiles, and a mega-reactor producing the un-seeable phenomenon of Blue Gorgon.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; Student Activity & Program Fee Board, UHM; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa.

Image:
Stéfane Perraud
Bleu Gorgone #02, 2016
Courtesy of the artist.

 

2018 MASTER OF FINE ARTS THESIS EXHIBITIONS

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m. Opening reception

The graduate program at the Department of Art + Art History, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa is a comprehensive and diverse center for the graduate study of the visual arts and Asian and Pacific art history. The exciting thesis exhibitions are part of a demanding course of study, production, and review. MFA candidates concurrently present new and engaging works that demonstrate each artist’s caliber of ideas, skills, awareness of the global context within which art is created and circulated, and critically engaged artistic practice.

The artists, the titles of their exhibitions, and their areas of specialization are:

Robert Flowers
Terra Keck
Lucy Oleshansky
Nisha Pinjani
Atis Puampai
Khari Saffo
Chiho Ushio

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

 

2018 BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

2018 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition
features works by BFA students in graphic design + studio art

April 22 – May 11, 2018
Commons Gallery (graphic design BFA)
The Art Gallery (studio art BFA)

Sunday, April 22
2–3 pm, Awards Ceremony, ART Auditorium
3–5 pm, Reception, The Art Gallery

(TBA)
Gallery walk-throughs with the artists, The Art Gallery

The 2018 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition showcases the accomplishments of nearly 30 forthcoming graduates from the BFA program in the Department of Art + Art History at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM). Each student’s thoughts, concepts and manifestations near the completion of coursework towards a BFA degree are highlighted in this exhibition.

This group exhibition is a culmination of a semester-long focused exploration of professional studio practice. Their work in graphic design, drawing and painting, glass, ceramics, fiber, printmaking, photography, and sculpture show a diverse range of ideas and techniques. The Graphic Design program presents its students’ work in The Commons Gallery. The works of the students in the Studio Art program are featured at The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; Student Activity & Program Fee Board, UHM; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa.

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays

Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.


ARCHIVE : EXHIBITION + EVENTS

WHORL / SITE-SPECIFIC INSTALLATION BY JACQUELINE RUSH LEE

jrl

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

WHORL
September 6, 2016 – September 6, 2017
A site-specific installation by Jacqueline Rush Lee.
The artist will create a new work amidst the bamboo grove near our art galleries. The work is loosely based on her recent series Elemental whereupon she inserts books into tree branches and stumps. After initial installation, Whorl will work in collaboration with nature over the period of one year.
Read more


2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 5 – April 7, 2017
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Sunday, March 5, 2017
2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Gallery walk-throughs
2:00 p.m. Jan Dickey
2:20 p.m. Hannah Day
2:40 p.m. Kelly Ciurej
3:00 – 5:00 p.m. Opening reception + music by The Drowning Dreamers Band

Friday, March 17, 2017
1:00 p.m. Hannah Day, Thesis defense

Friday, March 24, 2017
1:00 p.m. Kelly Ciurej, Thesis defense

Friday, April 7, 2017
1:00 p.m. Jan Dickey, Thesis defense

The graduate program at the Department of Art + Art History, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa is a comprehensive and diverse center for the graduate study of the visual arts and Asian and Pacific art history. The exciting thesis exhibitions are part of a demanding course of study, production, and review. MFA candidates concurrently present new and engaging works that demonstrate each artist’s caliber of ideas, skills, awareness of the global context within which art is created and circulated, and critically engaged artistic practice.

The artists, the titles of their exhibitions, and their areas of specialization are:

Kelly Ciurej, Artificial Sweetener, (photography)
Hannah Day, The Grove, (printmaking)
Jan Dickey, cover the earth, (painting)

EXHIBITION SUMMARIES + ARTIST STATEMENTS:

Kelly Ciurej presents Artificial Sweetener, an installation of digital prints

Artificial Sweetener is an exhibition that explores psychological “stickiness.” With this project Ciurej explores the misrepresentation of images as truth. The installation consists of approximately fifteen photographs at larger than life scale, in a combination of found family photographs, recipes, and staged performative studio photographs using sticky material such as sugars, food dyes, candies, pastries, processed foods, etc.

Artificial Sweetener is both an exhibition and an exploration of psychological “stickiness.” In these photographs, I exploit food materials that are largely glutinous—candies, pastries, and sugary treats—to study certain spaces of the mind that are internalized from familial experiences. The substances I manipulate are often heavy, sweet, sugar-based confections, widely used in processed foods as well as within the household setting for baked goods. They express both excess and absence, as these particular substances are the epitome of “junk foods,” high in additives and artificial sweeteners, but provide no value to the human body, often even causing it palpable harm. This material serves as a stand-in for an inescapable, smothering stickiness of the emotional spaces I am investigating through photography. The Artificial Sweetener installation is a way to visually explore and re-contextualize the shifting systems that are present within a nuclear family—to question an assumed knowledge of the past and the invented realities we often create for ourselves and for others.

Hannah Day presents The Grove, an installation of prints and drawings

These works in graphite and intaglio explore the uncertainty and perceived futility that consumes the life of the figure, a character explored through undefined narratives constructed primarily with repetitious imagery. A woman wearing a cage over her head like a helmet wanders the world of her subconscious, seemingly alone. At moments she is joined by a second figure, at others, she is isolated in a dense thicket of trees. A series of graphite drawings appear ghostly on the page, smooth and seamless impressions of unassuming portraits. In contrast, installations assembled of cut elements from line etchings are pieced together with the texture of a puzzle being put together with the wrong pieces.

Picturing one’s mental space as a literal terrain to be traversed and explored, The Grove puts on display the mental wanderings of one individual. A female figure is shown traipsing about the locales that compose her inner landscape, a space made up of densely wooded areas and pockets of stark nothingness. In her travels she finds things hidden amongst the trees that continually dissolve her trust in the line between real and imagined. Subject matter is rendered with a minimal value range, highlighting the work’s consideration of the ephemerality of her psychology and the instability of her understanding of her self and all that exists around her.

Jan Dickey presents cover the earth, an installation of paintings

The exhibition cover the earth focuses on two forms of painting: covering wall panels and painting on canvas. This installation of panels and canvases can be considered in sections or as one single painting. In either case, they are fragments of the great Painthing that covers the earth.

Paint never forms an everlasting impregnable lamination. People have gone to great lengths to design paints that will permanently bind earthly things into artificial spaces and aesthetic objects. Yet painted surfaces still eventually crack, flake, and discolor. The earth gets back in.

To better explore paint delamination and discoloration, I use pre-industrial painting materials like milk, eggs, animal glue, roots, and dirt. These materials take me deeper into the history of painting and closer to an understanding of paints as earthly substances.

The exhibition cover the earth emerges out of a love for watching entropy tug at the framed-off things people presume to be stable spaces and objects. As a painting project occurring in a gallery space, cover the earth specifically investigates the frame—the artificial edges—of personal-sized canvases and standard wall panels. With this exhibition, I have tried to make a place for those categories to erode into one another, to fade into whiteness, and slowly crack apart.

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays, Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 27.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 28 – 31.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

 

KELLY CIUREJ

k_ciurejportrait600x600

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as a part of 2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS at

The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
March 5 – April 7, 2017

Kelly Ciurej presents Artificial Sweetener, an installation of photographs

Artificial Sweetener is an exhibition that explores psychological “stickiness.” With this project I am exploring the misrepresentation of images as truth. The installation consists of approximately fifteen photographs at larger than life scale, in a combination of found family photographs, recipes, and staged performative studio photographs using sticky material such as sugars, food dyes, candies, pastries, processed foods, etc.

Artist’s Statement:
The Artificial Sweetener project first emerged in December of 2015 when I went back to my childhood home in Chicago and stumbled across many of my mother’s recipes as well as several boxes of family photographs, consisting of about thirty years of documentation of my family members’ lives. The conceptual basis of the work is an investigation of the ways in which photographs distort actual memories and instead create performed, invented realities. Artificial Sweetener examines specific relationships within the nuclear family and the incongruence between memory and photographic record. Using food materials, which are largely gluttonous—candies, pastries, and sugary treats—as subject I am exploring the stickiness of certain psychological spaces that are internalized from familial experiences. The substances I use are often heavy, sweet, sugar-based confections. They are artificial and/or “instant” ingredients, widely used in processed foods as well as within the household setting for baked goods. They express both excess and absence, as these particular substances are the epitome of “junk foods,” high in additives and artificial sweeteners, but providing no value to the human body, oftentimes even causing it palpable harm. This material serves as a stand in for an inescapable, smothering stickiness of the psychological and emotional spaces I am exploring.

more on Kelly Ciurej

couplewithgum600x600

Images:
Kelly Ciurej
Fat Tuesday, 2016
archival inkjet print

Kelly Ciurej
American Club, 1994, 2016
archival inkjet print



EXHIBITIONS + EVENTS

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Email:  gallery@hawaii.edu
Phone: 808.956.6888

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