Skip to Content
CURRENT + UPCOMING PROGRAMS


CURRENT EVENTS

SPRING 2018

Jelly Beans-E  WHORL / JACQUELINE RUSH LEE
Installation on view September 6, 2016 – September 6, 2018

Jelly Beans-E   WHEN WATERS RISE
February 12 – 28, 2018 / Commons Gallery

Jelly Beans-A   ART EVENT THE UNSEEN SEA
February 22, 2018, 3:00-5:00 p.m. / iLAB (building 37, adjacent to the ART Building)

Jelly Beans-A   ARTIST TALK ERICK SWENSON
Tuesday, February 27 / 3:00-4:30 p.m. / ART room 308

Jelly Beans-E  2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018 / The Art Gallery

Jelly Beans-E  MATERIAL SLIP
March 4 – April 6, 2018 / Commons Gallery

Jelly Beans-M  THE EXTENDED HAWAIIAN BODY
March 4 – May 4, 2018 / John Young Museum of Art

Jelly Beans-A  FREE LUNCHTIME MUSIC CONCERT
March 7, 2018, 12:00 – 1:30 p.m. / ART Building ground floor between the galleries

Jelly Beans-A  FREE LUNCHTIME MUSIC CONCERT
April 4, 2018, 12:00 – 1:30 p.m. / ART Building ground floor between the galleries

Jelly Beans-E  2018 BFA EXHIBITION
April 22 – May 11, 2018 / The Art Gallery & Commons Gallery

Jelly Beans-A  MOTHER’S DAY CERAMICS + GLASS SALE
dates/times TBA / ART Building, Ceramics Studio

Jelly Beans-A  FREE LUNCHTIME MUSIC CONCERT
May 2, 2018, 12:00 – 1:30 p.m. / ART Building ground floor between the galleries

Information may be subject to change.


WHEN WATERS RISE

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

when waters rise
features works by Professor Mary Babcock’s weaving students at UHM
February 12 – 28, 2018
Commons Gallery

when waters rise showcases the work of fiber students in Professor Babcock’s classes.

As students were beginning the Fall 2017 term, Hurricane Harvey was barreling the Texas coast bringing unfathomable floods to Houston and other regions in Texas and Louisiana. The media was saturated with images of streets transformed to rivers, heroic rescues and shelter crowded with evacuees.

Harvey began to dissipate, but Irma—an extremely powerful storm—soon took a tremendous toll on Barbuda, Saint Barthélemy, Saint Martin, Anguilla and the Virgin Islands before moving westward causing major damage in the Turks and Caicos, the Florida Keys.

Maria, the most powerful storm was still yet to come. The worst natural disaster on record for Haiti and the Dominican Republic, she was also the deadliest storm of a hyperactive 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, resulting in major catastrophic damage and a humanitarian crisis that the US government has allowed to leave unresolved.

Scientific American ran a story explicating the link between storm intensity, frequency and climate change. Yet many stories of rising waters seems to go unnoticed as they touch lands less familiar to our everyday narratives.

Saturated by all this information and impressed by gaps in understanding, ART 237 Woven Structures used weaving as a means to embark on a series of inquiries. What are the boundaries of our compassion? Who or what draws these lines? How might our exploration of these rising or receding waters deepen our understanding of the social and ecosystems that they impact?

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Closed weekends

Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.


THE UNSEEN SEA

  ART EVENT

THE UNSEEN SEA: ARTISTIC PERSPECTIVES FROM OKINAWA AND JAPAN
February 22, 2018
3:00-5:00 p.m.
iLab (Building 37, adjacent to the ART Building) at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Featuring:
Toyomi Hoshina, Professor of Art, Tokyo University of the Arts
Hoshina is known for his large-scale, site-specific installations that explore the duality of nature and artifice. He often utilizes natural materials such as wood, handmade paper and Sumi-ink to create geometric architectural structures that have been featured at the 12th Paris Biennale, Chengdu Biennale, Echigo-Tsumari Triennale and organizer of Ueno Town Art Museum in Tokyo. This talk will focus on nuclear radiation flowing in cycles of rainwater including ecological changes in water invisible to humans, but felt in the body directly through interrelation between parts.

James Jack, Assistant Professor of Art, Yale-NUS College, Singapore
Jack is known for his socially-engaged art practice in the Asia Pacific Region. His work focuses on the importance of conversation and interview as a process of remembering and recovering island histories. These become the foundation for his subtle installations of material objects, films, sound, and more that have been featured at the Setouchi Triennale, Busan Biennale Sea Art Festival, Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore and Satoshi Koyama Gallery in Tokyo. This talk will focus on the Pacific as a rich source for stories of interaction with spirits including social and ecological changes occurring in the sea made visible through botanical and historical perspectives in art.

Funding provided by Japan Foundation & Nomura Foundation.
and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa

All events are free and open to the public.

Parking fees may apply.

Image (top):
Masayuki Tamae
Community Monitoring of Coral Bleaching in Okinawa, 2017


ERICK SWENSON : VISITING ARTIST + PRESENTATION

Erick Swenson
“Kleine Schwarmerei”, 2014
Urethane resin, silicone, acrylic paint
58 1/4 x 18 1/2 x 18 1/2 inches
Collection of Lisa Dawson and Thomas Maurstad
Photo: Kevin Todora

Jelly Beans-A   ERICK SWENSON

ARTIST PRESENTATION
Tuesday, February 27 / 3-430pm
ART Building room 308

This event is held in conjunction with the Honolulu Museum of Art presenting Swenson’s first museum survey.

Abstruction: The Sculpture of Erick Swenson

March 1 – July 29, 2018

Known for his remarkably lifelike and labor-intensive sculptures of animals created from cast urethane resin, his work has been exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas; and UCLA/Hammer Museum of Art, Los Angeles.

Swenson’s sculptures often feature creatures in death or distress—such as a fawn being carried away by a large red cape, or a decomposing deer carcass. Other figures, while retaining a strongly individual sensibility, are displayed as hunting trophies or scientific specimens. The unique character of his creations, along with a meticulous attention to detail, even of less appealing organisms, such as a cluster of snails, evokes a reverence for these beings and their situations. These sculptures capture not only the tragedy, but the delicate and complex beauty of nature.

The underlying strength of the work lies in its ability to affect us visually and emotionally on multiple levels. We wonder how the artist constructed these pieces, feel for the creatures in distress, and are made uncomfortable by the stark reality of snails or decomposing flesh. At the same time the work celebrates the unique individuality that exists in nature, and encourages the viewer to appreciate this life while we have it.
-Katherine Love, Assistant Curator, Contemporary Art, Honolulu Museum of Art

Erick Swenson
“Ne Plus Ultra”, 2010
Urethane resin, acrylic paint
17 x 72 x 54 inches
Courtesy of the artist and Talley Dunn Gallery
Photo: Kevin Todora


2018 MASTER OF FINE ARTS THESIS EXHIBITIONS

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Opening reception
Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Thesis defenses
Fridays
March 9, 11:00 a.m. Terra Keck
March 9, 1:00 p.m. Atis Puampai
March 23, 11:00 a.m. Khari Saffo
March 23, 1:00 p.m. Robert Flowers
April 6, 10:00 a.m. Nisha Pinjani
April 6, 2:00 p.m. Chiho Ushio

The graduate program at the Department of Art + Art History, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa is a comprehensive and diverse center for the graduate study of the visual arts and Asian and Pacific art history. The exciting thesis exhibitions are part of a demanding course of study, production, and review. MFA candidates concurrently present new and engaging works that demonstrate each artist’s caliber of ideas, skills, awareness of the global context within which art is created and circulated, and critically engaged artistic practice.

The artists, the titles of their exhibitions, and their areas of specialization are:

Robert Flowers, Self Portrait: You and I, glass
Terra Keck, Secondhand Smoke, printmaking
Nisha Pinjani, Transgressing Boundaries, printmaking
Atis Puampai, Ancient Light, photography
Khari Saffo, Cool Kool Shirts Presents: Thot Collection Series 1 by Dana Jones, sculpture
Chiho Ushio, 響 (Hibiki) – Resonance, printmaking

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

 

MATERIAL SLIP

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

MATERIAL SLIP
March 4 – April 6, 2018
Commons Gallery

Combined opening receptions for:
Material Slip, Commons Gallery, UHM
2018 MFA Thesis Exhibitions, The Art Gallery, UHM
The Extended Hawaiian Body, John Young Museum of Art, UHM
Sunday, March 4, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m., The Art Gallery

Artists Margery Amdur (Philadelphia, PA), Diana Baumbach (Laramie, Wyoming), Josephine Cachemaille (Auckland, NZ), Michelle Forsyth (Toronto, Canada), Wendy Kawabata (Honolulu, Hawaii), and Io Palmer (Pullman, WA) isolate and subvert materials to pose questions about the role of materials and the handmade in the 21st century. In this exhibition the artists present work that has developed out of similar methodologies, but is visually distinct.

ARTIST TALK by Margery Amdur : Between-My-Selves
Tuesday, March 6 at 3pm, room 308

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; Waikiki Parc Hotel; and supported by UHM Student Activity and Program Fee Board.

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.

Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

Image:
Margery Amdur
Amass #17, 2017
Hand-cut, manipulated, and sealed miniature foam constructions, ink, gouache, pastel pigment, canvas
8′ x 10′ x 15″ – 24″
Courtesy of the artist


MARGERY AMDUR : VISITING ARTIST + PRESENTATION

Jelly Beans-A  ART  EVENTS  

VISITING ARTIST MARGERY AMDUR
February 22 – March 6, 2018
Amdur’s residency is a part of the exhibition MATERIAL SLIP.

PUBLIC LECTURE : Between-My-Selves
Tuesday, March 6 at 3pm
room 308

Originally from Pittsburgh, Margery Amdur received her B.F.A. from Carnegie-Mellon University and her MFA from the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Margery has had over 60 solo and two-person exhibitions. Her international exhibitions include Turkey, Hungary, Poland, England, Iceland, Latvia, and Suriname.

For over twenty years, Margery has been actively creating site-specific, indoor and outdoor temporary and permanent art installations. In 2012, she completed Walking on Sunshine, a permanent public art project, in the Spring Garden underground-subway station, Philadelphia, PA. In the fall of 2015, as part of the Art in Airport Program, Margery created My Nature, a mixed-media, site-specific installation in Terminal B, at the Philadelphia International Airport. Her work has been selected to be a part of the 2018 The 6th Riga International Textile Fiber Triennial at the Museum of Applied Arts and Exhibition Hall Arsenals.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; Waikiki Parc Hotel; and supported by UHM Student Activity and Program Fee Board.


ROBERT FLOWERS

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as part of 2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

SELF PORTRAIT: YOU AND I by Robert Flowers

ARTIST STATEMENT:
As an artist, I feel an obligation to strive for a panoptic view of the things around me. I am a student of the arts, and feel connected to the long arc of art history. My practice involves observing the relationships between objects as well as relationships between people and how interactions between the two occur. I believe it is the responsibility of an artist to walk on the edge of the expected, to try and create new meaning based on experience, sparking discourse or discussion. I think it is important to look at the tough, obnoxious, and unpleasant to find a way to re-present them in a new manner, not necessarily as a matter of beauty itself, but rather to do so in a way that makes addressing them an easier pill to swallow. I create work that facilitates
movements between historical and contemporary conditions, between simple daily life and paradigm-shifting thought or action.

The 21st century has offered us a wide range of new and innovative ways to communicate, conduct research, build capital, and express creativity. These technologies have permeated nearly all aspects of everyday life in some way or another, dominating the way we receive information, socialize, and create. Through the glass screens of our televisions, computers, and cellular devices we construct our realities and portray ourselves over these networks. More and more we are becoming removed from the sources of actual physical experiences, and trapped in a larger continuum of removed experience and multiplicity. It is confusing and chaotic at times, and easy to get distracted from real experiences. Along with seeing the onset of the new millennia, most of my existence in this world has coincided with numerous wars and other struggles worldwide. Witness to the events of 9/11 and the rise of the
terrorism right alongside the rise of the reality television star. Political systems have crumbled, nuclear armament is back on the rise. Rather than finding some common ground we can all stand on, there is just more and more stratification. It seems we are always anxiously on the brink of something out of our control. It is through the process of building of a solid glass wall that I examine the mechanisms of social constructionand the systems that control how it emerges and can be exploited. I’m interested in how shared assumptions about reality influence identity and how a change in material might skew our typical understanding about these assumptions.

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Opening reception
Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Thesis defense
Friday, March 23, 1:00 p.m.

DESCRIPTION:
I create work that facilitates movements between historical and contemporary conditions, between simple daily life and paradigm-shifting thought or action. Made from over 700 individual handmade cast glass bricks, and weighing in at over 4,000 pounds, Self Portrait: You and I is the largest sculpture I have ever made. The bricks were assembled into a glass wall/screen inside a fabricated steel frame. The transparent nature of glass suggests a possibility for better interaction of contentious parties—represented in my work purely as a function of the material. As our country is ever more divided over identity politics and other social constructions, it is my belief that we need more transparency and discourse.

Instagram: @formerly_functioning

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

Image (top):
Robert Flowers
Work-in-progress, 2017

 

TERRA KECK

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as part of 2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

SECONDHAND SMOKE by Terra Keck

ARTIST STATEMENT:
My work explores how images have historically informed female identity, affected women’s sense of self and body, and lead to the encouragement of violence against women. I am interested in how the patriarchal ideals perpetuated by these images have been rebranded to fit each new contemporary context they are found in, and the unique ways today’s young women are meeting them. My research filters these conceptual inquires through the internet phenomenon of the “Tumblr Girl” who exists digitally as a contextually shifting internet persona organized and projected through the social media website, Tumblr. My interest in this stems from my own immersion in “Tumblr Girl” culture, and my experience with the “glitter-mouthed” poisonous imagery regurgitated by their (our) blogs. In this way, my inquiry into historical images of women, neoliberal pseudo-feminism, and the “Tumblr Girl” is a revealing critique of my own assumptions of gender performance, and my role in the survival of these toxic patriarchal expectations.

My artistic research peels back the ostensibly endless layers of skin that have been built upon one another to cover the rot of society’s permissioned violence against women, but doing so through my own experience, with my own skin, my own body, and my own rot. My art practice combines printmaking, drawing and installation to generate a psychological context for the images I create, and to make space for an empathetic and reflective experience between the viewer and myself.

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Opening reception
Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Thesis defense
Friday, March 9, 11:00 a.m.

DESCRIPTION:
My installation consists of two adjacent rooms, with the second room only accessible by traversing the first. The walls of each room are covered with wallpaper, the first room being green and the second room being pink. The wallpapers depict female pelvic bones, leaches, rotting flowers, and tangled organs that appear delicate and nonthreatening from afar but reveal their sinister nature upon approach.

In the first room featuring the green wallpaper, the imagery in the drawings pulls directly from photos within my own family photo albums; images of my grandmother when she wanted to be a singer, images of my mother when she was a child growing up in an abusive household, images of my sisters and me attempting to navigate adolescence, etc.

The exterior room is meant to act as a skin or barrier between the interior and the exterior as it both conceals and contains the contents within. The drawings hung within the interior space more directly reference the toxic material and ideologies harbored within the gendered media we ingest, and reveal themselves as the sources of the toxic material festering just under the skin of the previous room.

Formerly acquainted with the plumes of smoke escaping the mouths of gap-toothed children smiling for a photo with Santa Claus, viewers discover the sources are burning pyres stoked with the boil-ridden bodies of young women with gaping manga-esque eyes. Toads emerging from the face of my cousin Tracey on school picture day are merely the beginning of a parade of amphibian creatures, human-like in posture as they dance around a ballooning female body.

The graphite drawings are delicately drafted and due to their small scale, the viewers must force themselves into an intimate relationship with the images in order to see them, and though the putrid imagery repels them the seductive and exquisite rendering of the imagery refuses to let them go.

Website: www.TerraKeck.com
Instagram: @herlovelyface

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

Image (top):
Terra Keck
Work-in-progress, 2017

 

NISHA PINJANI

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as part of 2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

TRANSGRESSING BOUNDARIES by Nisha Pinjani

ARTIST STATEMENT:
The focus of my research has been on the daily lives of South Asian women, specifically in my home city of Karachi, Pakistan. Within my art practice, I draw from my experiences of how I inhabit public and private spaces and rely on research from other South Asian scholars interested in gender, urban space and the right to everyday life.

Much of my investigation has been on how middle-class women in Pakistan navigate public spaces in its metropolitan cities. My research into how gender is interwoven in demarcations between and connotations of public and private spaces, has led me to deeply examine what private spaces and boundaries mean to women for whom unconditional access to public spaces is still a fantasy.

Within my art practice I investigate “phenomenal boundaries,” a term coined by sociologist Bridget Purcell, that is, the boundary not as “real,” but as experienced and constituted (or not) by its inhabitants. My aim is to think about place from the lens of gender and discuss phenomenal boundaries that women create to feel safer in public spaces, as well as the phenomenal boundaries of fear that women experience when they step into a public place.
Examining my relationship with place has led me to a deeper and expansive definition of phenomenal boundaries as constraining, or safe, and sometimes both at the same time.

My installation, titled Transgressing Boundaries investigates how women transgress and negotiate phenomenal boundaries to claim agency while also examining how the many boundaries women create to access public space, are in fact fragile and can easily be disrupted. I want to highlight the everyday labor women invest to transgress certain phenomenal boundaries and maintain others.

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Opening reception
Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Thesis defense
Friday, April 6, 10:00 a.m.

DESCRIPTION:
My exhibition is an invitation for the audience to navigate my private space, my home, in a public setting of a gallery. By removing the barriers between the public and the private, I am exploring this gendered hierarchy with in spaces. I want to observe the house as not the reverse from the outside world but instead a reflection of the social gendered power structure of the larger society. Exploring private spaces that can be interpreted as both as safety and constraint. Boundaries are generally perceived as rigid lines, or concrete walls, creating binary of private vs. public, home vs. market, etc., etc. In my work, the boundaries are explored as social constructions that can be disrupted, deconstructed, transgressed. I am interested in highlighting how women are negotiating, transgressing or pushing the boundaries they encounter in everyday life.

Website: www.nishapinjani.com
Instagram: @nishapinjani

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

Image (top):
Nisha Pinjani
Work-in-progress, 2017

 


EXHIBITIONS + EVENTS

    ABOUT

    CURRENT + UPCOMING

    ARCHIVE

THE ART + COMMONS GALLERY

    directions + where to park
    ART Building / 2535 McCarthy Mall
    Honolulu, Hawai'i 96822

    Fall + Spring Semester Hours
    M-F 10am - 4pm, Su 12 - 4pm
    closed holidays

JOHN YOUNG MUSEUM OF ART

    directions + where to park + hours
    2500 Dole Street
    Honolulu, Hawai'i 96822

Email:  gallery@hawaii.edu
Phone: 808.956.6888

LEGEND

     EXHIBITIONS EXHIBITIONS
     EXHIBITIONS INTERSECTIONS
     EXHIBITIONS ART EVENTS
     EXHIBITIONS SATELLITE EVENTS
     EXHIBITIONS MUSEUM