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CURRENT + UPCOMING PROGRAMS


CURRENT EVENTS 2016
 
 
Jelly Beans-E  IMAYŌ : JAPAN’S NEW TRADITIONISTS
October 13, 2016 – January 8, 2017 / Honolulu Museum of Art

Jelly Beans-S  WAIKIKI PARC FEATURES DAVID HARADA
November 17, 2016 – February 3, 2017 / Waikiki Parc Gallery

Jelly Beans-E  WHORL / JACQUELINE RUSH LEE
Installation on view September 6, 2016 – September 6, 2017
 
 
SPRING 2017
 

Jelly Beans-E  EARTH, SKY, TIME, LIGHT, SPACE : THE CERAMIC ART OF WAYNE HIGBY
January 17 – February 17, 2017 / The Art Gallery

Jelly Beans-A   MUSIC @ART – Lunchtime Concert
Wednesday, February 1, 12:30-2:00 pm / ART Breezeway

Jelly Beans-A   MUSIC @ART – Lunchtime Concert
Wednesday, March 1, 12:30-2:00 pm / ART Breezeway

Jelly Beans-E  2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 5 – April 7, 2017 / The Art Gallery

Jelly Beans-A   MUSIC @ART – Lunchtime Concert
Wednesday, April 5, 12:30-2:00 pm / ART Breezeway

Jelly Beans-E  2017 BFA EXHIBITION
April 23 – May 12, 2017 / The Art Gallery

Jelly Beans-A   MUSIC @ART – Lunchtime Concert
Wednesday, May 3, 12:30-2:00 pm / ART Breezeway

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WHORL / SITE-SPECIFIC INSTALLATION BY JACQUELINE RUSH LEE

jrl

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

WHORL
September 6, 2016 – September 6, 2017
A site-specific installation by Jacqueline Rush Lee.
The artist will create a new work amidst the bamboo grove near our art galleries. The work is loosely based on her recent series Elemental whereupon she inserts books into tree branches and stumps. After initial installation, Whorl will work in collaboration with nature over the period of one year.
Read more

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IMAYŌ : JAPAN’S NEW TRADITIONISTS

imayo

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

The exhibition IMAYŌ: JAPAN’S NEW TRADITIONISTS shows that the past is alive and with us. Animé, manga, and pop culture, along with Japan’s rich art and craft traditions provide a focus for this exhibition of contemporary art. Six artists utilize their innovations and technical mastery to propel those traditions toward new directions in the twenty-first century. Unique works are presented at two venues.

October 2 – December 2, 2016
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

October 13, 2016 – January 8, 2017
Honolulu Museum of Art

Additional Exhibition-Related Program!

EXHIBITION DESCRIPTION
The exhibition examines the inspirational power of historical Japanese art and craft traditions in the work of six contemporary artists, all of whom utilize their expertise in the history and technical mastery of Japan’s rich pre-twentieth century art and craft traditions. Their artworks demonstrate how cultural heritage can inspire transformational and innovative thinking, with the potential to renew and reinvigorate the familiar and the conventional. The exhibition both honors and transcends the confines of “tradition,” reflecting and commenting upon Japan’s own complex relationship with the past. This approach is ironically referenced in the exhibition title word Imayō, a Japanese term of ancient origin that means “in the contemporary style.” After its presentation in Honolulu, Imayō will travel to The Shoto Museum Museum of Art (Shōtō Bijutsukan) in Tokyo. Additional venues are under consideration.

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS
ISHII Tōru, KIMURA Ryōko, MITSUTA Haruo, SOMEYA Satoshi, TANADA Kōji, and YAMAMOTO Tarō

CURATOR John Szostak

Additional Exhibition-Related Program!

SPONSORS
UHM Department of Art + Art History; UHM College of Arts + Humanities; Honolulu Museum of Art; The Cooke Foundation; Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities; Japan Foundation; UHM Center for Japanese Studies; UHM Japan Studies Endowment; UHM SEED Initiative for Diversity, Equity, Access and Success; UHM Student Activity and Program Fee Board; Waikiki Parc Hotel; GalleryHNL; and anonymous donors.

HOURS & ADMISSION

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WAIKIKI PARC FEATURES DAVID HARADA

BFA2016_Universityof Hawaii

Jelly Beans-S  SATELLITE

DAVID HARADA at WAIKIKI PARC GALLERY
November 17, 2016 – February 3, 2017
Public Reception: Thursday, November 17, 2016 / 6-8pm

David Harada’s sculptures are highlighted as part of an expanded arts partnership of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM), the Halekulani and its sister hotel, the Waikiki Parc.

Born and raised in Mililani, Hawai‘i, David Harada received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with an emphasis in glass from the Department of Art + Art History, UHM, in 2016. Glass inspires him because of its transparency, refractivity, and quality to be perceived as a liquid or a solid. His current work includes sculptures made of laminated glass that are ground and highly polished.

Harada states, “Memories are stratified by thoughts and emotions. They may appear permanent but like gemstones they erode and chip away over time. Each newly exposed facet reveals a layer of hidden history, providing new perspectives on the whole.” Read more

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EARTH, SKY, TIME, LIGHT, SPACE : THE CERAMIC ART OF WAYNE HIGBY

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Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

EARTH, SKY, TIME, LIGHT, SPACE : THE CERAMIC ART OF WAYNE HIGBY
features works by Wayne Higby, professor and the Robert C. Turner Chair of Ceramic Art at Alfred University, NY, and director and chief curator of the Alfred Ceramic Art Museum
January 17 – February 17, 2017
The Art Gallery

Artist Statement:
Earth, sky, time, light, space: my work is a meditation on the relationship between mind and matter.

The exhibition Earth, Sky, Time, Light, Space: The Ceramic Art of Wayne Higby highlights the diverse work by esteemed and internationally-recognized contemporary ceramics artist Wayne Higby. The exhibition features a selection of approximately 21 works by Higby that include a variety of sizes, shapes, forms, and time periods. Inspired by the American landscape, Higby has created innovative vessels, sculpture, and architectural installations. In addition, his experiences in China affected his ingenious efforts in porcelain and raku earthenware. Higby has been acclaimed as a living legend and visionary of the American Crafts Movement by the American Craft Museum. He is the Intersections Visiting Artist at the Department of Art + Art History, UH Manoa, for spring 2017.

Higby will be in Honolulu to give his lecture, Light Falling on Grass, which was previously presented to a sold-out crowd at George Washington University. He will discuss and explore how his innovative works use landscape imagery as a focal point for contemplation and reflection.

The exhibition is being held in partnership with Hawai‘i Craftsmen, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting fine craft in the art community of Hawai‘i, and in celebration of its 50th anniversary.

Special events (free & open to the public):
Tuesday, Feb. 7:
1:00 – 2:00 p.m., The Art Gallery
Gallery walk-through with Wayne Higby

Thursday, Feb. 9:
3:30 – 4:30 p.m., The Art Gallery
Reception

4:30 – 5:30 p.m., Art Building, room 101
Light Falling on Grass, a public lecture by Wayne Higby

Sponsors:
University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; Intersections Visiting Artist + Scholar Program; Hawai‘i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts through appropriations from the Legislature of the State of Hawai‘i and by the National Endowment for the Arts; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; Hawai’i Craftsmen, and anonymous donors.

11-higby-cloud-construction-winter_med

Images:
EarthCloud: Interior 3, 2012. Photograph, wood frame and Plexiglas.
25″ x 35″ x 1″
Courtesy of the artist.

Cloud Construction: Winter, 2014. Porcelain and wood.
22.625″ x 27.625″ x 7″
Courtesy of the artist.

Gallery hours:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 pm
Closed: Saturdays
Free admission. Donations are appreciated. Parking fees may apply.

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2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS

square-mfa-2017

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 5 – April 7, 2017
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Events (TBA)

The graduate program at the Department of Art + Art History, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa is a comprehensive and diverse center for the graduate study of the visual arts and Asian and Pacific art history. The exciting thesis exhibitions are part of a demanding course of study, production, and review. MFA candidates concurrently present new and engaging works that demonstrate each artist’s caliber of ideas, skills, awareness of the global context within which art is created and circulated, and critically engaged artistic practice.

The artists, the titles of their exhibitions, and their areas of specialization are:

Kelly Ciurej, Artificial Sweetener, (photography)
Hannah Day, The Grove, (printmaking)
Jan Dickey, cover the earth, (painting)

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays, Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 27.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 28 – 31.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

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KELLY CIUREJ

k_ciurejportrait600x600

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as a part of 2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS at

The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
March 5 – April 7, 2017

Kelly Ciurej presents Artificial Sweetener, an installation of photographs

Artificial Sweetener is an exhibition that explores psychological “stickiness.” With this project I am exploring the misrepresentation of images as truth. The installation consists of approximately fifteen photographs at larger than life scale, in a combination of found family photographs, recipes, and staged performative studio photographs using sticky material such as sugars, food dyes, candies, pastries, processed foods, etc.

Artist’s Statement:
The Artificial Sweetener project first emerged in December of 2015 when I went back to my childhood home in Chicago and stumbled across many of my mother’s recipes as well as several boxes of family photographs, consisting of about thirty years of documentation of my family members’ lives. The conceptual basis of the work is an investigation of the ways in which photographs distort actual memories and instead create performed, invented realities. Artificial Sweetener examines specific relationships within the nuclear family and the incongruence between memory and photographic record. Using food materials, which are largely gluttonous—candies, pastries, and sugary treats—as subject I am exploring the stickiness of certain psychological spaces that are internalized from familial experiences. The substances I use are often heavy, sweet, sugar-based confections. They are artificial and/or “instant” ingredients, widely used in processed foods as well as within the household setting for baked goods. They express both excess and absence, as these particular substances are the epitome of “junk foods,” high in additives and artificial sweeteners, but providing no value to the human body, oftentimes even causing it palpable harm. This material serves as a stand in for an inescapable, smothering stickiness of the psychological and emotional spaces I am exploring.

more on Kelly Ciurej

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Images:
Kelly Ciurej
Fat Tuesday, 2016
archival inkjet print

Kelly Ciurej
American Club, 1994, 2016
archival inkjet print

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HANNAH DAY

figureandtreesimg_5244_600x600

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as a part of 2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS at

The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
March 5 – April 7, 2017

Hannah Day presents The Grove, an installation of drawings and prints

These works in graphite and intaglio explore the uncertainty and perceived futility that consumes the life of the figure, a character explored through undefined narratives constructed primarily with repetitious imagery. A woman wearing a cage over her head like a helmet, wanders the world of her subconscious, seemingly alone. At moments she is joined by a second figure, at others, she is isolated in a dense ticket of trees. A series of graphite drawings appear ghostly on the page, smooth and seamless impressions of unassuming portraits. In contrast, installations assembled of cut elements from line etchings are pieced together with the texture of a puzzle being put together with the wrong pieces.

Artist Statement:
Picturing one’s mental space as a literal terrain to be traversed and explored, The Grove puts on display the mental wanderings of one individual. A female figure is shown traipsing about the locales that compose her inner landscape, a space made up of densely wooded areas and pockets of stark nothingness. In her travels she finds things hidden amongst the trees that continually dissolve her trust in the line between real and imagined. Subject matter is rendered with a minimal value range, highlighting the work’s consideration of the ephemerality of her psychology and the instability of her understanding of her self and all that exists around her.

more on Hannah Day

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Images:
Hannah Day
(work in progress)

Hannah Day
Paper cut elements (work in progress)

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JAN DICKEY

painting5_600x600

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as a part of 2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS at

The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
March 5 – April 7, 2017

Jan Dickey presents cover the earth, an installation of paintings

cover the earth focuses on two forms of painting: covering walls with white house paint, i.e. “whitewashing,” and laminating the surface of textiles that are stretched over wooden frames, i.e. “paintings on canvas” or “easel paintings.”

Artist’s Statement:
This is the kind of research I do. I look for affective responses that occur according to the cracks and flows of natural tempera paint (milk and eggs), as well as in the seepage of soil, rust, rabbit skin glue, and madder root. I am always stretching, un-stretching, and re-stretching canvas over wooden frames. Sometimes the back becomes the front. I staple the canvas directly to wall and remove it. Sometimes the wall becomes a painting. I get closer and closer to my materials and their smells become more familiar: the stench of milk curd, the hot choking steam from the madder root, the congealing animal fat, etc. Nothing is revealed. There are irrational fleeting moments of closeness to paint, and painting. My objects are the result of this fugitive searching, an the unending labor of pulling things together and looking at them, holding them gently in place, as they discolor and come apart.

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more on Jan Dickey

Images:
Jan Dickey
cover the earth (painting5), 2016
milk paint, egg tempera, rabbit skin glue, rust, madder root, and soil on cotton canvas, over wooden frame
27″ x 19″ x 2″

Jan Dickey
cover the earth (painting15), 2016
milk paint, egg tempera, rabbit skin glue, madder root, and soil on cotton canvas, over wooden frame
19.75″ x 17″ x 4″

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2017 BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION

square-bfa-2017

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

2017 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition
features works by BFA students in graphic design + studio art

April 23 – May 12, 2017
Commons Gallery (graphic design BFA)
The Art Gallery (studio art BFA)

Sunday, April 23
2-3 pm, Awards Ceremony, ART Auditorium
3-5 pm, Reception, The Art Gallery

Gallery walk-throughs with the artists, The Art Gallery
(dates/times TBA)

2017 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition showcases the accomplishments of nearly 30 forthcoming graduates from the BFA program in the Department of Art + Art History at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM). Each student’s thoughts, concepts and manifestations near the completion of coursework towards a BFA degree are highlighted in this exhibition—each one has endeavored to create his or her most challenging and ambitious artwork yet.

This group exhibition is a culmination of a semester-long focused exploration of professional studio practice. Their pieces in graphic design, drawing and painting, glass, ceramics, fiber, printmaking, photography, and sculpture show a diverse range of ideas and techniques. The Graphic Design program presents its students’ work in The Commons Gallery. The works of the students in the Studio Art program are featured at The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays

Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

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EXHIBITIONS + EVENTS

    ABOUT

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THE ART + COMMONS GALLERY

    directions + where to park
    ART Building / 2535 McCarthy Mall
    Honolulu, Hawai'i 96822

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    M-F 10am - 4pm, Su 12 - 4pm
    closed holidays

JOHN YOUNG MUSEUM OF ART

    directions + where to park + hours
    2500 Dole Street
    Honolulu, Hawai'i 96822

Email:  gallery@hawaii.edu
Phone: 808.956.6888

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