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CURRENT + UPCOMING PROGRAMS


NISHA PINJANI

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as part of 2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

TRANSGRESSING BOUNDARIES by Nisha Pinjani

ARTIST STATEMENT:
The focus of my research has been on the daily lives of South Asian women, specifically in my home city of Karachi, Pakistan. Within my art practice, I draw from my experiences of how I inhabit public and private spaces and rely on research from other South Asian scholars interested in gender, urban space and the right to everyday life.

Much of my investigation has been on how middle-class women in Pakistan navigate public spaces in its metropolitan cities. My research into how gender is interwoven in demarcations between and connotations of public and private spaces, has led me to deeply examine what private spaces and boundaries mean to women for whom unconditional access to public spaces is still a fantasy.

Within my art practice I investigate “phenomenal boundaries,” a term coined by sociologist Bridget Purcell, that is, the boundary not as “real,” but as experienced and constituted (or not) by its inhabitants. My aim is to think about place from the lens of gender and discuss phenomenal boundaries that women create to feel safer in public spaces, as well as the phenomenal boundaries of fear that women experience when they step into a public place.
Examining my relationship with place has led me to a deeper and expansive definition of phenomenal boundaries as constraining, or safe, and sometimes both at the same time.

My installation, titled Transgressing Boundaries investigates how women transgress and negotiate phenomenal boundaries to claim agency while also examining how the many boundaries women create to access public space, are in fact fragile and can easily be disrupted. I want to highlight the everyday labor women invest to transgress certain phenomenal boundaries and maintain others.

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Opening reception
Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Thesis defense
Friday, April 6, 10:00 a.m.

DESCRIPTION:
My exhibition is an invitation for the audience to navigate my private space, my home, in a public setting of a gallery. By removing the barriers between the public and the private, I am exploring this gendered hierarchy with in spaces. I want to observe the house as not the reverse from the outside world but instead a reflection of the social gendered power structure of the larger society. Exploring private spaces that can be interpreted as both as safety and constraint. Boundaries are generally perceived as rigid lines, or concrete walls, creating binary of private vs. public, home vs. market, etc., etc. In my work, the boundaries are explored as social constructions that can be disrupted, deconstructed, transgressed. I am interested in highlighting how women are negotiating, transgressing or pushing the boundaries they encounter in everyday life.

Website: www.nishapinjani.com
Instagram: @nishapinjani

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

Image (top):
Nisha Pinjani
Work-in-progress, 2017

 

ATIS PUAMPAI

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as part of 2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

ANCIENT LIGHT by Atis Puampai

ARTIST STATEMENT:
According to NASA’s research the sunlight illuminating our present is between 10,000 to 100,000 years old. Utilization of this ancient light is the basis of my thesis exhibition Ancient Light, comprised of three separate yet interrelated series that explore alternate perspectives of the effects of time as recorded by photography. Collectively, the three series draw from 16th to 20th century scientific theories that furthered our knowledge of the sun and light. The photographic techniques I employed likewise refer to the early history of photography. Ancient Light explores the imperceptible effects of time on our present moment.

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Opening reception
Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Thesis defense
Friday, March 9, 1:00 p.m.

DESCRIPTION:
Ancient Light makes time visible through photographs of natural phenomena. The exhibition consists of large-scale photographs and the homemade or modified cameras that produced them. The makeshift cameras are homage to photography’s early history and the images employed the principles of scientific theories developed from the 16th to 20th centuries.

Website: www.atispuampai.com
Instagram: @exceptionally.flat

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

Image (top):
Atis Puampai
Waves Study #023, 2017

 

KHARI SAFFO

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as part of 2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

COOL KOOL SHIRTS PRESENTS: THOT COLLECTION SERIES 1 BY DANA JONES by Khari Saffo

ARTIST STATEMENT:
I work in a variety of mediums such as animation, sculpture, video, and shirt design. Within my practice I find ways to connect each of these mediums within the same project. Currently, I am interested in exploring conceptual themes within commercial practices. I have a shirt brand titled Cool Kool Shirts within the brand I explore the themes of brand loyalty and brand persona through my brand spokesperson/mascot Dana Jones. Dana Jones is portrayed by me wearing a cardboard head mask. As advertisements for the brand, I create a series of live-action videos, animations, and comics. Dana Jones himself is an artist who creates sculptures from melted vinyl records.

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Opening reception
Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Thesis defense
Friday, March 23, 11:00 a.m.

DESCRIPTION:
I’m exploring the relationship between an art practice with a commercial market through my artist persona Dana Jones and his relationship as the spokesperson for my shirt brand Cool Kool Shirts. In order to sustain himself and his art practice Dana Jones receives funding from Cool Kool Shirts. In return, the shirt brand uses his image and art to sell t-shirts. As the relationship grows Cool Kool Shirts wants more influence on Dana’s art and how it can promote the brand. Dana Jones’s goal is to create a completely autonomous concept. He forms sculptures made from melted vinyl records he calls thots. Dana creates each thot without actively thinking about the form to make shapes that represents an unfiltered piece of his stream of consciousness. My project consists of a wall installation of Dana’s thots. Embedded in the installation are animations displaying the relationship between Dana Jones and Cool Kool Shirts.

Website: www.kharicreates.com
Instagram: @khari_creates

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

Image (top):
Khari Saffo
Work-in-progress (detail), 2017

 

CHIHO USHIO

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as part of 2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

RESONANCE by Chiho Ushio

SPECIAL EVENTS
All events are free and open to the public.

Opening reception
Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Thesis defense
Friday, April 6, 2:00 p.m.

DESCRIPTION:
響 (Hibiki) – Resonance explores a holistic view of the universe through contemplating dots—elementary particles that create the whole universe including our bodies. I was inspired by the idea of 素生 (so-sei), introduced by Ken Kobayashi, Ph.D., from the view point of Quantum medicine. So-sei refers to “fundamental love” and “life force” that are innately in each elementary particle. My work consists of stone lithography prints and the application of tusche wash techniques. Numerous dots printed on the washi paper are the records of events occurring in the artmaking process. Grease particles resonate within their environment while mixed in tushe water. 響 (Hibiki) – Resonance ponders the mutual relationship between 心 (minds), our bodies and the universe, representing how invisible elements resonate with each other and create this reality.

Website: www.chihoushio.com
Instagram: @chiholinolino

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

Image (top):
Chiho Ushio
Work-in-progress, 2017

 

MARGERY AMDUR : VISITING ARTIST + PRESENTATION

Jelly Beans-A  ART  EVENTS  

VISITING ARTIST MARGERY AMDUR
February 22 – March 6, 2018
Amdur’s residency is a part of the exhibition MATERIAL SLIP.

PUBLIC LECTURE : Between-My-Selves
Tuesday, March 6 at 3:30 p.m.
room 308

Originally from Pittsburgh, Margery Amdur received her B.F.A. from Carnegie-Mellon University and her MFA from the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Margery has had over 60 solo and two-person exhibitions. Her international exhibitions include Turkey, Hungary, Poland, England, Iceland, Latvia, and Suriname.

For over twenty years, Margery has been actively creating site-specific, indoor and outdoor temporary and permanent art installations. In 2012, she completed Walking on Sunshine, a permanent public art project, in the Spring Garden underground-subway station, Philadelphia, PA. In the fall of 2015, as part of the Art in Airport Program, Margery created My Nature, a mixed-media, site-specific installation in Terminal B, at the Philadelphia International Airport. Her work has been selected to be a part of the 2018 The 6th Riga International Textile Fiber Triennial at the Museum of Applied Arts and Exhibition Hall Arsenals.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; Waikiki Parc Hotel; and supported by UHM Student Activity and Program Fee Board.


IO PALMER: ARTIST TALK

Jelly Beans-A  ART  EVENTS  

ARTIST TALK IO PALMER
Sunday, March 4 at 2:30 p.m.
Commons Gallery

Combined opening reception for 2018 MFA Thesis Exhibition, Material Slip, The Extended Hawaiian Body
Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Palmer’s talk is a part of the exhibition MATERIAL SLIP.

Io Palmer hails from Hydra, Greece, and is inspired by man made disasters, couture garment designs, and various other industrial and domestic forms. Through her artworks she explores complex issues of class and societal excess. She holds a BFA from the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, PA, and an MFA from the University of Arizona. Palmer has been featured in several national and international exhibitions including Dak’Art, 11ème Biennale de l’Art Africain Contemporain, Dakar, Senegal; Singular Masses, Hyde Gallery, Memphis College of Art, Memphis, TN, Working History at Reed College, Portland, OR, and Hair Follies at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec. She has participated in residencies at Sanskriti, New Delhi, India; the Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, NM; Art Channel, Beijing, China and Ucross, Clermont, WY. Io recently received an Idaho Commission on the Arts Grant. Palmer currently resides in Pullman, WA.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; Waikiki Parc Hotel; and supported by UHM Student Activity and Program Fee Board.


WHEN WATERS RISE

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

when waters rise
features works by Professor Mary Babcock’s weaving students at UHM
February 12 – 28, 2018
Commons Gallery

when waters rise showcases the work of fiber students in Professor Babcock’s classes.

As students were beginning the Fall 2017 term, Hurricane Harvey was barreling the Texas coast bringing unfathomable floods to Houston and other regions in Texas and Louisiana. The media was saturated with images of streets transformed to rivers, heroic rescues and shelter crowded with evacuees.

Harvey began to dissipate, but Irma—an extremely powerful storm—soon took a tremendous toll on Barbuda, Saint Barthélemy, Saint Martin, Anguilla and the Virgin Islands before moving westward causing major damage in the Turks and Caicos, the Florida Keys.

Maria, the most powerful storm was still yet to come. The worst natural disaster on record for Haiti and the Dominican Republic, she was also the deadliest storm of a hyperactive 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, resulting in major catastrophic damage and a humanitarian crisis that the US government has allowed to leave unresolved.

Scientific American ran a story explicating the link between storm intensity, frequency and climate change. Yet many stories of rising waters seems to go unnoticed as they touch lands less familiar to our everyday narratives.

Saturated by all this information and impressed by gaps in understanding, ART 237 Woven Structures used weaving as a means to embark on a series of inquiries. What are the boundaries of our compassion? Who or what draws these lines? How might our exploration of these rising or receding waters deepen our understanding of the social and ecosystems that they impact?

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Closed weekends

Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.


ERICK SWENSON : VISITING ARTIST + PRESENTATION

Erick Swenson
“Kleine Schwarmerei”, 2014
Urethane resin, silicone, acrylic paint
58 1/4 x 18 1/2 x 18 1/2 inches
Collection of Lisa Dawson and Thomas Maurstad
Photo: Kevin Todora

Jelly Beans-A   ERICK SWENSON

ARTIST PRESENTATION
Tuesday, February 27 / 330-430pm
ART Building room 308

This event is held in conjunction with the Honolulu Museum of Art presenting Swenson’s first museum survey.

Abstruction: The Sculpture of Erick Swenson

March 1 – July 29, 2018

Known for his remarkably lifelike and labor-intensive sculptures of animals created from cast urethane resin, his work has been exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas; and UCLA/Hammer Museum of Art, Los Angeles.

Swenson’s sculptures often feature creatures in death or distress—such as a fawn being carried away by a large red cape, or a decomposing deer carcass. Other figures, while retaining a strongly individual sensibility, are displayed as hunting trophies or scientific specimens. The unique character of his creations, along with a meticulous attention to detail, even of less appealing organisms, such as a cluster of snails, evokes a reverence for these beings and their situations. These sculptures capture not only the tragedy, but the delicate and complex beauty of nature.

The underlying strength of the work lies in its ability to affect us visually and emotionally on multiple levels. We wonder how the artist constructed these pieces, feel for the creatures in distress, and are made uncomfortable by the stark reality of snails or decomposing flesh. At the same time the work celebrates the unique individuality that exists in nature, and encourages the viewer to appreciate this life while we have it.
-Katherine Love, Assistant Curator, Contemporary Art, Honolulu Museum of Art

Erick Swenson
“Ne Plus Ultra”, 2010
Urethane resin, acrylic paint
17 x 72 x 54 inches
Courtesy of the artist and Talley Dunn Gallery
Photo: Kevin Todora


THE UNSEEN SEA

  ART EVENT

THE UNSEEN SEA: ARTISTIC PERSPECTIVES FROM OKINAWA AND JAPAN
February 22, 2018
3:00-5:00 p.m.
iLab (Building 37, adjacent to the ART Building) at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Featuring:
Toyomi Hoshina, Professor of Art, Tokyo University of the Arts
Hoshina is known for his large-scale, site-specific installations that explore the duality of nature and artifice. He often utilizes natural materials such as wood, handmade paper and Sumi-ink to create geometric architectural structures that have been featured at the 12th Paris Biennale, Chengdu Biennale, Echigo-Tsumari Triennale and organizer of Ueno Town Art Museum in Tokyo. This talk will focus on nuclear radiation flowing in cycles of rainwater including ecological changes in water invisible to humans, but felt in the body directly through interrelation between parts.

James Jack, Assistant Professor of Art, Yale-NUS College, Singapore
Jack is known for his socially-engaged art practice in the Asia Pacific Region. His work focuses on the importance of conversation and interview as a process of remembering and recovering island histories. These become the foundation for his subtle installations of material objects, films, sound, and more that have been featured at the Setouchi Triennale, Busan Biennale Sea Art Festival, Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore and Satoshi Koyama Gallery in Tokyo. This talk will focus on the Pacific as a rich source for stories of interaction with spirits including social and ecological changes occurring in the sea made visible through botanical and historical perspectives in art.

Funding provided by Japan Foundation & Nomura Foundation.
and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa

All events are free and open to the public.

Parking fees may apply.

Image (top):
Masayuki Tamae
Community Monitoring of Coral Bleaching in Okinawa, 2017


MICHAEL WANG : VISITING ARTIST + PRESENTATION

Jelly Beans-A  ART  EVENTS  

VISITING ARTIST MICHAEL WANG
February 1-28, 2018

PUBLIC LECTURE
Tuesday, February 20 at 4pm
room 101

UHM_ART parter Trades A.i.R. is pleased to announce their 2nd Artist in Residence MICHAEL WANG.

Today’s art world is understood as a system no different from other systems—be they ecological, economic, or political. But there’s more: no clear boundary separates the networks of these systems. If anything, there are points of intersection. Michael Wang explores the aesthetics of an art that actively engages with these systems, and the perspective of artists as they consider the objectives, limits and structure of a work that is no longer a matter of objects, but nimbly moves through the folds of these systems as energy.

Michael Wang (Born 1981 Olney, MD. Lives/works New York, NY) uses systems that operate on a global scale as media for art: species distribution, climate change, resource allocation and the global economy. His works include “Extinct in the Wild” a series that examines the unique status of species that persist exclusively under human care, “Carbon Copies,” an exhibition linking the production of artworks to the release of greenhouse gases, “Rivals,” a series that connects the sale of artworks to corporate finance, “Terroir,” monochrome paintings made from the ground bedrock of world cities, and “World Trade,” an exhibition tracing the material aftermath of theWorld Trade Center after the attacks of 9/11. He has exhibited in Europe, Asia, and the Americas, most recently at the Fondazione Prada in Milan, Foxy Production in New York City, and Parque Cultural in Valparaíso (all 2017). His theoretical writings have appeared in Log, Mousse, Texte zur Kunst, Artforum, and Cabinet, among others.

In Hawai‘i, he will continue his “Extinct in the Wild” project which has been shown at the Fondazione Prada in Milan, and at the XX Bienal de Arquitectura y Urbanismo in Valparaíso Chile. Adopting the scientific designation “Extinct in the Wild,” Wang’s work focuses on flora and fauna species that are no longer found in nature but that persist through human intervention and care. These species represent a “kind of passage from nature into culture,” and with Wang’s intervention a further transition into the realm of fine art. Michael hopes to document the last location where these species were observed in the wild as well as their preservation in captivity or cultivation. In Hawai‘i, he is particularly interested in learning more about the ʻAlalā (Corvus hawaiiensis) on Hawai‘i island; the Ālula (Brighamia insignis) on Kaua‘i; Mt. Kaʻala Cyanea (Cyanea superba) and Sharktail Cyanea (Cyanea pinnatifida) on O‘ahu; and the Kokiʻo (Kokia cookei) on Molokaʻi.

TRADES A.i.R. program seeks to address the underrepresentation of contemporary art in the Hawaiian Islands by providing maximum community access and fostering arts appreciation locally. At the core of our mission is a Visiting Artist in Residence Program. TRADES aims to fund travel, lodging and studio space for selected national and international visiting artists. Committed to outreach, we are partnered with the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Hawai‘i Mānoa. TRADES creates a round-trip circuit for contemporary art in the islands, with the introduction of offshore techniques and the exportation of local perspectives. TRADES was founded by Don Felix Cervantes and Aaron Wong in January 2016. A sponsored project of Fractured Atlas, our intended reach is to all Hawaiian Islands and to visiting artists worldwide.



EXHIBITIONS + EVENTS

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Email:  gallery@hawaii.edu
Phone: 808.956.6888

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