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CURRENT + UPCOMING PROGRAMS


ATIS PUAMPAI

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as part of 2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

ANCIENT LIGHT by Atis Puampai

ARTIST STATEMENT:
NASA’s research of the sun suggests the sunlight illuminating our present is between 10,000 to 100,000 years old. The concept of the direct utilization of this light in the medium of photography initiated my work in Ancient Light. My exhibition is a collection of three separate, yet interrelated series that explore alternate perspectives of the effects of time in photographs. Collectively, the three series are based in 16th to 20th century scientific theories that furthered our knowledge of the sun and light; my photographic techniques refer to the early history of photography. Ancient Light
provides views of the past to explore the imperceptible effects of time during our present.

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Opening reception
Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Thesis defense
Friday, March 9, 1:00 p.m.

DESCRIPTION:
Ancient Light makes time visible through photographs of natural phenomena. The exhibition consists of large-scale photographs and the homemade or modified cameras that produced them. The makeshift cameras are homage to photography’s early history and the images employed the principles of scientific theories developed from the 16th to 20th centuries.

Website: www.atispuampai.com
Instagram: @exceptionally.flat

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

Image (top):
Atis Puampai
Waves Study #023, 2017

 

KHARI SAFFO

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as part of 2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

COOL KOOL SHIRT PRESENTS: THOT COLLECTION SERIES 1 BY DANA JONES by Khari Saffo

ARTIST STATEMENT:
I work in a variety of mediums such as animation, sculpture, video, and shirt design. Within my practice I find ways to connect each of these mediums within the same project. Currently, I am interested in exploring conceptual themes within commercial practices. I have a shirt brand titled Cool Kool Shirts within the brand I explore the themes of brand loyalty and brand persona through my brand spokesperson/mascot Dana Jones. Dana Jones is portrayed by me wearing a cardboard head mask. As advertisements for the brand, I create a series of live-action videos, animations, and comics. Dana Jones himself is an artist who creates sculptures from melted vinyl records.

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Opening reception
Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Thesis defense
Friday, March 23, 11:00 a.m.

DESCRIPTION:
I’m exploring the relationship between an art practice with a commercial market through my artist persona Dana Jones and his relationship as the spokesperson for my shirt brand Cool Kool Shirts. In order to sustain himself and his art practice Dana Jones receives funding from Cool Kool Shirts. In return, the shirt brand uses his image and art to sell t-shirts. As the relationship grows Cool Kool Shirts wants more influence on Dana’s art and how it can fully promote the brand. Dana Jones values his individual concepts and practice to an extreme degree. Dana Jones’s goal is to create a completely autonomous concept without any outside influence. He forms sculptures made from melted vinyl records he calls “Thots.” Dana creates each thot without thinking about the form to make shapes that represents an unfiltered piece of his stream of consciousness. My project consists of a wall installation of Dana’s thots and embedded in the installation are animations that display the relationship between Dana Jones and Cool Kool Shirts.

Website: www.kharicreates.com
Instagram: @khari_creates

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

Image (top):
Khari Saffo
Work-in-progress (detail), 2017

 

CHIHO USHIO

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as part of 2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

RESONANCE by Chiho Ushio

SPECIAL EVENTS
All events are free and open to the public.

Opening reception
Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Thesis defense
Friday, April 6, 2:00 p.m.

DESCRIPTION:
響 (Hibiki) – Resonance explores holistic view of the universe through contemplating dots, elementary particles that creates the whole universe including our bodies. Ushio was inspired by the idea of 素生 (so-sei), introduced by Ken Kobayashi Ph.D. from the view point of Quantum medicine, which refers ‘fundamental love’ and ‘life force’ that we have innately in each elementary particle. This work consists of stone lithography prints applied a specific technique called tusche-water wash. Numerous dots printed on the washi-papers are the records of events while artmaking process, how the grease particles resonated with the environment while paddling in tushe water. 響 (Hibiki) – Resonance ponders the mutual relationship between 心(kokoro- minds), our bodies and the universe, how all invisible elements resonate each other and create this reality.

Website: www.chihoushio.com
Instagram: @chiholinolino

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

Image (top):
Chiho Ushio
Work-in-progress, 2017

 

THE EXTENDED HAWAIIAN BODY

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

The Extended Hawaiian Body
March 4 – May 4, 2018
John Young Museum of Art

Opening Reception: Sunday, March 4, 2018
3-5 p.m. at the Art Gallery
Combined reception for the openings for The Extended Hawaiian Body, Material Slip at the Commons Gallery, and 2018 MFA Thesis Exhibitions at The Art Gallery, UHM

The Extended Hawaiian Body features works by:
Maile Andrade
Kaili Chun
Kaui Chun
April Drexel
Noelle Kahanu
Kapulani Landgraf
Marques Marzan
Maika’i Tubbs

Artists participating in this exhibition deal with various aspects of the Hawaiian body extended. This can involve kino lau, the many physical forms taken by Hawaiian akua (deities) or ‘aumakua (family deities), but the concept applies to other metaphoric extensions of the collective Hawaiian “body” as well. Artists may address aspects of (reactions to) colonialism as well as the post/colonial Hawaiian
body.

Dr. Deborah Waite, professor of Pacific art history at UHM, is the curator of this exhibition.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa.

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed weekends; Spring break Mar. 26 – 30.

Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

Image (top):
Kaui Chun
Kū I Mauli Ola, Standing in the Essence, 2002-2018
mylar, ink
96 x 144 inches


WHEN WATERS RISE

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

when waters rise
features works by Professor Mary Babcock’s weaving students at UHM
February 12 – 28, 2018
Commons Gallery

when waters rise showcases the work of fiber students in Professor Babcock’s classes.

As students were beginning the Fall 2017 term, Hurricane Harvey was barreling the Texas coast bringing unfathomable floods to Houston and other regions in Texas and Louisiana. The media was saturated with images of streets transformed to rivers, heroic rescues and shelter crowded with evacuees.

Harvey began to dissipate, but Irma—an extremely powerful storm—soon took a tremendous toll on Barbuda, Saint Barthélemy, Saint Martin, Anguilla and the Virgin Islands before moving westward causing major damage in the Turks and Caicos, the Florida Keys.

Maria, the most powerful storm was still yet to come. The worst natural disaster on record for Haiti and the Dominican Republic, she was also the deadliest storm of a hyperactive 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, resulting in major catastrophic damage and a humanitarian crisis that the US government has allowed to leave unresolved.

Scientific American ran a story explicating the link between storm intensity, frequency and climate change. Yet many stories of rising waters seems to go unnoticed as they touch lands less familiar to our everyday narratives.

Saturated by all this information and impressed by gaps in understanding, ART 237 Woven Structures used weaving as a means to embark on a series of inquiries. What are the boundaries of our compassion? Who or what draws these lines? How might our exploration of these rising or receding waters deepen our understanding of the social and ecosystems that they impact?

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Closed weekends

Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.


2018 BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

2018 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition
features works by BFA students in graphic design + studio art

April 22 – May 11, 2018
Commons Gallery (graphic design BFA)
The Art Gallery (studio art BFA)

Sunday, April 22
2–3 pm, Awards Ceremony, ART Auditorium
3–5 pm, Reception, The Art Gallery

(TBA)
Gallery walk-throughs with the artists, The Art Gallery

The 2018 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition showcases the accomplishments of nearly 30 forthcoming graduates from the BFA program in the Department of Art + Art History at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM). Each student’s thoughts, concepts and manifestations near the completion of coursework towards a BFA degree are highlighted in this exhibition.

This group exhibition is a culmination of a semester-long focused exploration of professional studio practice. Their work in graphic design, drawing and painting, glass, ceramics, fiber, printmaking, photography, and sculpture show a diverse range of ideas and techniques. The Graphic Design program presents its students’ work in The Commons Gallery. The works of the students in the Studio Art program are featured at The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; Student Activity & Program Fee Board, UHM; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa.

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays

Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.


ARCHIVE : EXHIBITION + EVENTS

LEGEND

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITIONS
Jelly Beans-I  INTERSECTIONS
Jelly Beans-A  ART EVENTS
Jelly Beans-S  SATELLITE EVENTS
Jelly Beans-M  MUSEUM

 
2017-2018

Jelly Beans-E  Beauty of Mokuhanga : Discipline & Sensibility
Jelly Beans-E  Tinfish at 22
Jelly Beans-A  Amy Yao : Visiting Artist + Presentation
Jelly Beans-A  Symposium : Tradition and Contemporaneity In the Arts of Asia

 
2016-2017

Jelly Beans-E  12 x 12
Jelly Beans-E  Drew Broderick with Gan Ueda : Diamond Head
Jelly Beans-E  Peter Chamberlain : Aesthetic Surplus Kompany
Jelly Beans-E  Earth, Sky, Time, Light, Space : The Ceramic Art of Wayne Higby
Jelly Beans-E  Goodgirl
Jelly Beans-E  Imayō : Japan’s New Traditionists
Jelly Beans-E  Nick Potter : 1000 Utopias
Jelly Beans-E  Readymade Place
Jelly Beans-E  Markus Vogl + Margarita Benitez : Collider 7 [Voxel]
Jelly Beans-E  Thomas Walker : Painted Forms : Recent Investigations
Jelly Beans-A  Artists In Residence : Map Office
Jelly Beans-A  Roundtable : Art and Critical Geographies In Hawai‘i
Jelly Beans-A  Visiting Scholar/Curator : Defne Ayasi
Jelly Beans-S  Waikiki Parc Features Dana Brewer
Jelly Beans-S  Waikiki Parc Features Michael Connolley
Jelly Beans-S  Waikiki Parc Features David Harada
Jelly Beans-S  Waikiki Parc Features Momoe Nakajima
Jelly Beans-S  Waikiki Parc Features Janet Tran
Jelly Beans-M  Fragments & Empire : Cambodian Art from the Angkor Period
Jelly Beans-M  The Laminated Print: Origins + Process of Chine Collé
Jelly Beans-M  Ula Leo / ‘Imaikalani Kalahele + Cory Taum

 
2015-2016

Jelly Beans-E  Andrew Binkley : Portals
Jelly Beans-E  Cephalopod Interface
Jelly Beans-E  Chris Bird Jones : ohi, ho’ahu, gather, casglu
Jelly Beans-E  Extended Personhood—An Exhibition of Postcards from Hawai‘i Between 1898 – 1920
Jelly Beans-E  Kelly Ciurej : Foreign Fruit
Jelly Beans-E  Jan Dickey : Pieces of Napoleon Blownapart
Jelly Beans-E  Groeniger [Meta]
Jelly Beans-E  Hunt+Gather
Jelly Beans-E  New New York : Abstract Painting in the 21st Century
Jelly Beans-E  KALO
Jelly Beans-E  Under Pressure: Editioned Prints from ART 318, Intermediate Printmaking
Jelly Beans-E  Jenny Sanzaro-Nishimura
Jelly Beans-E  KALO
Jelly Beans-E  Selections from the Collection of Arm & Roller Press
Jelly Beans-E  Ways of Looking
Jelly Beans-I  Julia Bryan-Wilson
Jelly Beans-I  Andrea Dezsö
Jelly Beans-S  Waikiki Parc Features Percy Lam
Jelly Beans-S  Waikiki Parc Features Erin Marquez
Jelly Beans-S  Waikiki Parc Features Shannon Webb

 
2014-2015
Read more


HARUKA IHARADA

ART EVENT

HARUKA IHARADA: ALTERNATIVE ART IN ASIA (OR, HOW TO USE ART TO SURVIVE IN THE WORLD)
February 14, 2018
3:30-5:30
iLab (Building 36, adjacent to the ART Building) at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Haruka Iharada will introduce case studies of artists based on her film and curatorial projects around Asia, with a special attention on Okinawa, her birth-place. In these various contexts, she identifies an alternative constellation emerging against the background of globalization. Haruka Iharada is an Independent Curator and Arts Coordinator. Born in 1991 in Okinawa, she holds an MA in Tokyo University of the Arts. She is in charge of the Collaboration Project with ASEAN countries as a Research Associate of the Tokyo University of the Arts. She has organized exhibitions, film screenings, and symposiums. She has been especially committed to filming art related to militarism in the Okinawa Prefecture, recently worked on the Yorimichi Caravan Project a filmmaking project and screening tour in seven cities across Asia, and curated the exhibition The more beautiful it becomes: Uthukusikereba Utukusiihodo at Maruki-Gallary(Saitama Prefecture), 2017.

All events are free and open to the public.

Funding provided by Japan Foundation & Nomura Foundation

Parking fees may apply.


ISOTOPIA PACIFICA, STÉFANE PERRAUD COLLABORATION WITH ARAM KEBABDJIAN

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

Isotopia Pacifica, Stéfane Perraud
 Collaboration with Aram Kebabdjian
November 26, 2017 – February 9, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Aloha and Welcome to Isotopia!, by Noe Tanigawa, Hawaii Public Radio

Special events:
All events are free and open to the public.

Sunday, November 26
2:00–3:00 p.m., Gallery walk-through with Stéfane Perraud
3:00–5:00 p.m., Opening reception with music by Gunner Nagata & Billy Sage V

Tuesday, November 28
3:00–4:00 p.m., Gallery walk-through with Stéfane Perraud

Thursday, November 30
4:30–6:30 p.m., Public lecture by Stéfane Perraud, Art Building, Room 101
A Visual Poetry on the Most Dangerous Element, 49
Perraud discusses his collaboration with Aram Kebabdjian on Isotopia Pacifica and focuses on an isotope created during the World War II—element 49, also known as plutonium 239.

The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM) presents a contemporary art exhibition that highlights the collaboration of French artist Stéfane Perraud and writer Aram Kebabdjian and their recent work in the Pacific islands.

Isotopia is a fictional volcanic island invented by trans-media artist Stéfane Perraud and writer/collaborator Aram Kebabdjian. They describe an island with a military base somewhere between the 62nd and 63rd parallels—far from the normal sea routes—and populated by a few scientists, inhabitants, and a few visionaries. Perraud and Kebabdjian first explored this mirage in 2014 during an exhibition in La Malterie, in Lille, France. At the Galerie de Roussan, Paris, 2015, they hunted for isotopes on Isotopia.

In November 2017, the duo intends to investigate the possible links between Isotopia and the Hawaiian Islands. Perraud and Kebabdjian employ literary and sculptural machines that depict the immense power of the isotope and the legacy of the development of modern nuclear energy. Faux artifacts of the Cold War tests and secret bases in the Pacific are presented as clues to nefarious military operations—lost fleets of secret submarines, errant nuclear missiles, and a mega-reactor producing the un-seeable phenomenon of Blue Gorgon.

Artist info, statement, & images

Sponsors:
University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; Hawai‘i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts, through appropriations from the Legislature of the State of Hawai‘i or grants from the National Endowment for the Arts;Student Activity & Program Fee Board, UHM; Student Athletic Fee Committee, UHM; SEED IDEAS, UHM; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; and anonymous donors.

Address, Hours, + Admission:
University of Hawai‘i Art Gallery
2535 McCarthy Mall, Honolulu (UH Mānoa campus)
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.; Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
By appointment: Dec. 17, 2017 – Jan. 8, 2018. Contact: Rod Bengston, gallery director ; 808-956-6079
Closed: Saturdays; Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 23; non-instructional day, Nov. 24; Christmas Eve, Dec. 24; Christmas Day, Dec. 25; New Year’s Eve, Dec. 31; New Year’s Day, Jan. 1; Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Jan. 15.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

Image:
Stéfane Perraud
Bleu Gorgone #02, 2016
Courtesy of the artist.

 

ISOTOPIA PACIFICA ARTIST INFO, STATEMENT, + IMAGES

ARTIST STATEMENT:
My research is the nuclear spectrum: touching that which would be the sign or the form of the nuclear effect by imagining a radiant body, a material live, mutant and bombarded with isotopes.

Isotopia is the parallel world, utopia infernal, built from the table of isotopes which serves as a workshop and exhibition area—where visitors are invited to discover and reflect on this monstrous body of impossible matter. —Stéfane Perraud

ARTIST INFO:

Stéfane Perraud explores scientific and technological impasses through drawing, photography, sculpture and interactive installation. Essentially prospective, his multimedia aesthetics evoke an archaeology of the future.

One of the artist’s main subjects concerns light and how it relates, both symbolically and scientifically, to knowledge and disaster at the same time. Using diverse electronic techniques, notably light programming, his works interact with the viewer’s body, movement and perception, all the while bridging the histories of science and art.

Born in 1975, Stéfane Perraud is a visual artist who first worked in performance and multimedia. He earned an MA in Arts, as a designer/conceptor in decorative arts, and studied multimedia and scenography as a double major at ENSAD (National School for Decorative Arts). From 2008, Perraud has been working on the limits and challenges of new media/trans-media through research initiated since then, within a constant back and forth from plastic to performance practice. Since 2010, nuclear energy and radioactive material have become two of his principal fields of research.

Perraud has participated in numerous artist residencies in France, Canada, and Holland. His recent exhibitions in 2015 include Aux abords de la vallée, Galerie de Roussan, France; Festival Les Bouillants, Le genre, Exposition de Féminin/Masculin at Le Volume, Vernes sur Sèche near Rennes;

Mutations, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris; and Isotopia, Espace Culture Lille 1, France. Perraud has performed in Vienna, Oslo, Paris, Rio de Janeiro, Palermo, and at the Museum of Modern Art, New York City. He has also served as curator, artistic director, programmer, and organizer of festivals, events, and programs in Rio de Janeiro, Tokyo, Paris, and in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Stéfane Perraud lives and works in Montreuil, just outside Paris, France. Galerie de Roussan in Paris, under the direction of Jeanne Lepine and Anne Brengou, previously represented him.

Aram Kebabdjian, born in 1978, holds a doctorate in the history of philosophy. He is a photographer and an award-winning author. His first novel, titled The Idle, is a work of fiction based on the world of contemporary art. Kebabdjian and Perraud have collaborated on several projects, combining Perraud’s visual work with Kebabdjian’s poetry and graphic design. They often describe their collaborations for the Isotopia installation series as theater.

Images courtesy of Stéfane Perraud:
Blue Flesh, 2017
Plexiglass, pork gelatin, strontium
variable dimensions

Edwin, 2017
print on paper, laser engraving
40 x 30 cm

 


EXHIBITIONS + EVENTS

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    Honolulu, Hawai'i 96822

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    closed holidays

JOHN YOUNG MUSEUM OF ART

    directions + where to park + hours
    2500 Dole Street
    Honolulu, Hawai'i 96822

Email:  gallery@hawaii.edu
Phone: 808.956.6888

LEGEND

     EXHIBITIONS EXHIBITIONS
     EXHIBITIONS INTERSECTIONS
     EXHIBITIONS ART EVENTS
     EXHIBITIONS SATELLITE EVENTS
     EXHIBITIONS MUSEUM