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CURRENT + UPCOMING PROGRAMS


2018 MASTER OF FINE ARTS THESIS EXHIBITIONS

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Sunday, March 4, 2018
3:00 – 5:00 p.m. Opening reception

The graduate program at the Department of Art + Art History, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa is a comprehensive and diverse center for the graduate study of the visual arts and Asian and Pacific art history. The exciting thesis exhibitions are part of a demanding course of study, production, and review. MFA candidates concurrently present new and engaging works that demonstrate each artist’s caliber of ideas, skills, awareness of the global context within which art is created and circulated, and critically engaged artistic practice.

The artists, the titles of their exhibitions, and their areas of specialization are:

Robert Flowers
Terra Keck
Lucy Oleshansky
Nisha Pinjani
Atis Puampai
Khari Saffo
Chiho Ushio

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays; Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 26; Good Friday, Mar. 30;
Easter, Apr. 1.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 27 – 29.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

 

2018 BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

2018 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition
features works by BFA students in graphic design + studio art

April 22 – May 11, 2018
Commons Gallery (graphic design BFA)
The Art Gallery (studio art BFA)

Sunday, April 22
2–3 pm, Awards Ceremony, ART Auditorium
3–5 pm, Reception, The Art Gallery

(TBA)
Gallery walk-throughs with the artists, The Art Gallery

The 2018 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition showcases the accomplishments of nearly 30 forthcoming graduates from the BFA program in the Department of Art + Art History at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM). Each student’s thoughts, concepts and manifestations near the completion of coursework towards a BFA degree are highlighted in this exhibition.

This group exhibition is a culmination of a semester-long focused exploration of professional studio practice. Their work in graphic design, drawing and painting, glass, ceramics, fiber, printmaking, photography, and sculpture show a diverse range of ideas and techniques. The Graphic Design program presents its students’ work in The Commons Gallery. The works of the students in the Studio Art program are featured at The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; Student Activity & Program Fee Board, UHM; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa.

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays

Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.


ARCHIVE : EXHIBITION + EVENTS

WHORL / SITE-SPECIFIC INSTALLATION BY JACQUELINE RUSH LEE

jrl

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

WHORL
September 6, 2016 – September 6, 2017 (extended through 2018)
A site-specific installation by Jacqueline Rush Lee.
The artist will create a new work amidst the bamboo grove near our art galleries. The work is loosely based on her recent series Elemental whereupon she inserts books into tree branches and stumps. After initial installation, Whorl will work in collaboration with nature over the period of one year.
Read more


2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS
March 5 – April 7, 2017
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

SPECIAL EVENTS:
All events are free and open to the public.

Sunday, March 5, 2017
2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Gallery walk-throughs
2:00 p.m. Jan Dickey
2:20 p.m. Hannah Day
2:40 p.m. Kelly Ciurej
3:00 – 5:00 p.m. Opening reception + music by The Drowning Dreamers Band

Friday, March 17, 2017
1:00 p.m. Hannah Day, Thesis defense

Friday, March 24, 2017
1:00 p.m. Kelly Ciurej, Thesis defense

Friday, April 7, 2017
1:00 p.m. Jan Dickey, Thesis defense

The graduate program at the Department of Art + Art History, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa is a comprehensive and diverse center for the graduate study of the visual arts and Asian and Pacific art history. The exciting thesis exhibitions are part of a demanding course of study, production, and review. MFA candidates concurrently present new and engaging works that demonstrate each artist’s caliber of ideas, skills, awareness of the global context within which art is created and circulated, and critically engaged artistic practice.

The artists, the titles of their exhibitions, and their areas of specialization are:

Kelly Ciurej, Artificial Sweetener, (photography)
Hannah Day, The Grove, (printmaking)
Jan Dickey, cover the earth, (painting)

EXHIBITION SUMMARIES + ARTIST STATEMENTS:

Kelly Ciurej presents Artificial Sweetener, an installation of digital prints

Artificial Sweetener is an exhibition that explores psychological “stickiness.” With this project Ciurej explores the misrepresentation of images as truth. The installation consists of approximately fifteen photographs at larger than life scale, in a combination of found family photographs, recipes, and staged performative studio photographs using sticky material such as sugars, food dyes, candies, pastries, processed foods, etc.

Artificial Sweetener is both an exhibition and an exploration of psychological “stickiness.” In these photographs, I exploit food materials that are largely glutinous—candies, pastries, and sugary treats—to study certain spaces of the mind that are internalized from familial experiences. The substances I manipulate are often heavy, sweet, sugar-based confections, widely used in processed foods as well as within the household setting for baked goods. They express both excess and absence, as these particular substances are the epitome of “junk foods,” high in additives and artificial sweeteners, but provide no value to the human body, often even causing it palpable harm. This material serves as a stand-in for an inescapable, smothering stickiness of the emotional spaces I am investigating through photography. The Artificial Sweetener installation is a way to visually explore and re-contextualize the shifting systems that are present within a nuclear family—to question an assumed knowledge of the past and the invented realities we often create for ourselves and for others.

Hannah Day presents The Grove, an installation of prints and drawings

These works in graphite and intaglio explore the uncertainty and perceived futility that consumes the life of the figure, a character explored through undefined narratives constructed primarily with repetitious imagery. A woman wearing a cage over her head like a helmet wanders the world of her subconscious, seemingly alone. At moments she is joined by a second figure, at others, she is isolated in a dense thicket of trees. A series of graphite drawings appear ghostly on the page, smooth and seamless impressions of unassuming portraits. In contrast, installations assembled of cut elements from line etchings are pieced together with the texture of a puzzle being put together with the wrong pieces.

Picturing one’s mental space as a literal terrain to be traversed and explored, The Grove puts on display the mental wanderings of one individual. A female figure is shown traipsing about the locales that compose her inner landscape, a space made up of densely wooded areas and pockets of stark nothingness. In her travels she finds things hidden amongst the trees that continually dissolve her trust in the line between real and imagined. Subject matter is rendered with a minimal value range, highlighting the work’s consideration of the ephemerality of her psychology and the instability of her understanding of her self and all that exists around her.

Jan Dickey presents cover the earth, an installation of paintings

The exhibition cover the earth focuses on two forms of painting: covering wall panels and painting on canvas. This installation of panels and canvases can be considered in sections or as one single painting. In either case, they are fragments of the great Painthing that covers the earth.

Paint never forms an everlasting impregnable lamination. People have gone to great lengths to design paints that will permanently bind earthly things into artificial spaces and aesthetic objects. Yet painted surfaces still eventually crack, flake, and discolor. The earth gets back in.

To better explore paint delamination and discoloration, I use pre-industrial painting materials like milk, eggs, animal glue, roots, and dirt. These materials take me deeper into the history of painting and closer to an understanding of paints as earthly substances.

The exhibition cover the earth emerges out of a love for watching entropy tug at the framed-off things people presume to be stable spaces and objects. As a painting project occurring in a gallery space, cover the earth specifically investigates the frame—the artificial edges—of personal-sized canvases and standard wall panels. With this exhibition, I have tried to make a place for those categories to erode into one another, to fade into whiteness, and slowly crack apart.

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays, Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 27.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 28 – 31.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

SPONSORS: University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Art + Art History and College of Arts + Humanities; and supported by Waikiki Parc Hotel – Hospitality Sponsor for the Arts at UH Mānoa; Student Activity and Program Fee Board, UHM; and anonymous donors.

 

KELLY CIUREJ

k_ciurejportrait600x600

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as a part of 2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS at

The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
March 5 – April 7, 2017

Kelly Ciurej presents Artificial Sweetener, an installation of photographs

Artificial Sweetener is an exhibition that explores psychological “stickiness.” With this project I am exploring the misrepresentation of images as truth. The installation consists of approximately fifteen photographs at larger than life scale, in a combination of found family photographs, recipes, and staged performative studio photographs using sticky material such as sugars, food dyes, candies, pastries, processed foods, etc.

Artist’s Statement:
The Artificial Sweetener project first emerged in December of 2015 when I went back to my childhood home in Chicago and stumbled across many of my mother’s recipes as well as several boxes of family photographs, consisting of about thirty years of documentation of my family members’ lives. The conceptual basis of the work is an investigation of the ways in which photographs distort actual memories and instead create performed, invented realities. Artificial Sweetener examines specific relationships within the nuclear family and the incongruence between memory and photographic record. Using food materials, which are largely gluttonous—candies, pastries, and sugary treats—as subject I am exploring the stickiness of certain psychological spaces that are internalized from familial experiences. The substances I use are often heavy, sweet, sugar-based confections. They are artificial and/or “instant” ingredients, widely used in processed foods as well as within the household setting for baked goods. They express both excess and absence, as these particular substances are the epitome of “junk foods,” high in additives and artificial sweeteners, but providing no value to the human body, oftentimes even causing it palpable harm. This material serves as a stand in for an inescapable, smothering stickiness of the psychological and emotional spaces I am exploring.

more on Kelly Ciurej

couplewithgum600x600

Images:
Kelly Ciurej
Fat Tuesday, 2016
archival inkjet print

Kelly Ciurej
American Club, 1994, 2016
archival inkjet print


HANNAH DAY

figureandtreesimg_5244_600x600

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as a part of 2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS at

The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
March 5 – April 7, 2017

Hannah Day presents The Grove, an installation of drawings and prints

These works in graphite and intaglio explore the uncertainty and perceived futility that consumes the life of the figure, a character explored through undefined narratives constructed primarily with repetitious imagery. A woman wearing a cage over her head like a helmet, wanders the world of her subconscious, seemingly alone. At moments she is joined by a second figure, at others, she is isolated in a dense thicket of trees. A series of graphite drawings appear ghostly on the page, smooth and seamless impressions of unassuming portraits. In contrast, installations assembled of cut elements from line etchings are pieced together with the texture of a puzzle being put together with the wrong pieces.

Artist Statement:
Picturing one’s mental space as a literal terrain to be traversed and explored, The Grove puts on display the mental wanderings of one individual. A female figure is shown traipsing about the locales that compose her inner landscape, a space made up of densely wooded areas and pockets of stark nothingness. In her travels she finds things hidden amongst the trees that continually dissolve her trust in the line between real and imagined. Subject matter is rendered with a minimal value range, highlighting the work’s consideration of the ephemerality of her psychology and the instability of her understanding of her self and all that exists around her.

more on Hannah Day

papercutelementsinprgs_hannahday600x600

Images:
Hannah Day
(work in progress)

Hannah Day
Paper cut elements (work in progress)


JAN DICKEY

painting5_600x600

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

On view as a part of 2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS at

The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
March 5 – April 7, 2017

Jan Dickey presents cover the earth, an installation of paintings

cover the earth focuses on two forms of painting: covering walls with white house paint, i.e. “whitewashing,” and laminating the surface of textiles that are stretched over wooden frames, i.e. “paintings on canvas” or “easel paintings.”

Artist’s Statement:
This is the kind of research I do. I look for affective responses that occur according to the cracks and flows of natural tempera paint (milk and eggs), as well as in the seepage of soil, rust, rabbit skin glue, and madder root. I am always stretching, un-stretching, and re-stretching canvas over wooden frames. Sometimes the back becomes the front. I staple the canvas directly to wall and remove it. Sometimes the wall becomes a painting. I get closer and closer to my materials and their smells become more familiar: the stench of milk curd, the hot choking steam from the madder root, the congealing animal fat, etc. Nothing is revealed. There are irrational fleeting moments of closeness to paint, and painting. My objects are the result of this fugitive searching, an the unending labor of pulling things together and looking at them, holding them gently in place, as they discolor and come apart.

painting15_600x600

more on Jan Dickey

Images:
Jan Dickey
cover the earth (painting5), 2016
milk paint, egg tempera, rabbit skin glue, rust, madder root, and soil on cotton canvas, over wooden frame
27″ x 19″ x 2″

Jan Dickey
cover the earth (painting15), 2016
milk paint, egg tempera, rabbit skin glue, madder root, and soil on cotton canvas, over wooden frame
19.75″ x 17″ x 4″


DIAMOND HEAD by DREW BRODERICK WITH GAN UYEDA

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

DIAMOND HEAD by Drew Broderick with Gan Uyeda
March 13 – April 7, 2017
Commons Gallery

ARTIST CONVERSATIONS + DUAL OPENING:
Sunday, March 19 / 1:00-4:00pm @ Commons Gallery + John Young Museum of Art
Dual opening Diamond Head by Drew Broderick with Gan Uyeda at Commons Gallery + Ula Leo by ‘Imaikalani Kalahele and Cory Taum at John Young Museum of Art.
1:30–2:00 Artist conversations with ‘Imaikalani Kalahele and Cory Taum at John Young Museum of Art
2:30–3:00 Artist conversation with Drew Broderick at the Commons Gallery

Exhibition Information:

Located in the ahupuaʻa of Waikīkī on the southern shore of the island of Oʻahu, Diamond Head crater has been utilized for various social, political, and cultural purposes throughout the islands’ history. A short layover for Tūtū Pele on her mythic journey across the Hawaiian archipelago in search of a suitable home, Diamond Head is said to have been her Oʻahu abode. In the late 18th century, after his successful conquest of Oʻahu, the Maui chief Kahekili is often credited with the construction of Papaʻenaʻena heiau (a Hawaiian temple dedicated to surfing), one of several heiau located on the crater’s slopes. Following the unification of the Hawaiian Islands by Hawaii chief Kamehameha I, American business interests pushed for the spread of the United States into the Pacific. In order to make way for new developments in the mid 19th century, the stones that once formed the sacred grounds of Papaʻenaʻena were crushed to pave the streets of an increasingly expanding Waikīkī. After the illegal annexation of the kingdom of Hawaii at the end of the 19th century, Diamond Head was purchased by the US Government as the soon-to-be home of Fort Ruger, the Territory of Hawaii’s first military reservation. Established in 1906, Fort Ruger was a strategically important installation for the US military in the early 20th century.

Diamond Head has since served an almost exclusively commercial function. Aside from the multi-million dollar properties sprinkled along its slopes, the crater itself is a physical background to any iconic image of Waikīkī, and as such has become the stock logo of a booming international tourism industry that now hosts millions of visitors a year. Diamond Head, an exhibition of new work by Drew Broderick with Gan Uyeda, considers the role that Diamond Head, or more specifically its silhouette, has played in the branding, marketing, and consumption of Hawaiʻi by locals and tourists alike. Whether it’s a free pamphlet at the visitor information counter, a $5.99 postcard on the streets of Waikīkī, or a $24.99 novelty t-shirt online, it is certain that iconicity comes at a price. Diamond Head’s transformation from a geological feature of Oʻahu into a mass-produced symbol of Paradise is deserving of continual examination.

Artist Information:

Drew Broderick is an artist and cultural producer living and working between Honolulu, Hawaii and Los Angeles, California. He is the founder and director of SPF Projects — an arts effort dedicated to building capacity for contemporary art and dialogue in Hawaiʻi. He is also a contributing member of Honolulu-based collective PARADISE COVE. Broderick received a BA from Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT.

Gan Uyeda is a curator and writer based in Chicago. He serves as Associate Director at Richard Gray Gallery and organizes exhibitions with the curatorial collective Third Object. His writing has appeared in Frieze, Artslant, and ArtCritical, and he holds dual MAs in Art History and Arts Administration from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC).

This exhibition and its related events are part of UHM ART: CRITICAL GEOGRAPHY IN HAWAI‘I SERIES that highlights local and international artists who address social-cultural concerns associated with space, place, and environment in O‘ahu. Programs consider diverse approaches by artists including mapping and map-making and visual story-telling.

Gallery hours + admission:
Mon. – Fri. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays, Prince Kūhiō Day, Mar. 27.
By appointment: Spring Break, Mar. 28 – 31.
Free admission. Donations are appreciated.
Parking fees may apply.

This event is made possible by the Student Activity Program Fee Board, UHM.

Contact: Jaimey Hamilton Faris | hamilton.faris@hawaii.edu

Image:
Landmark Looking at Itself in a Mirror
vintage postcard
Collection of the artist.


READYMADE PLACE

readymadeimg_2494signpcs600x600

Jelly Beans-E  EXHIBITION

Readymade Place
January 9 – 27, 2017
Commons Gallery

Jan Dickey and Nisha Pinjani, graduate art students at the Department of Art + Art History, have organized an exhibition entitled Readymade Place. Contributions to this exhibition were made by Atis Puampai, Baixin Chen, Kainoa Gruspe, Sheanae Tam, Brad Taylor, Nick Hunsinger, Charles Cohan, Gaye Chan, and Gideon Gerlt.

Readymade Place Statement:
readymadestatementweb600x600

Dickey and Pinjani are currently pursuing MFA degrees in painting and in printmaking respectively at the Department of Art + Art History, UHM.

Gallery Hours / M-F 10 am – 4 pm; Sun. 12 – 4 pm
Closed Sat.
Admission to exhibition is free. Parking fees may apply.



EXHIBITIONS + EVENTS

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THE ART + COMMONS GALLERY

    directions + where to park
    ART Building / 2535 McCarthy Mall
    Honolulu, Hawai'i 96822

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    M-F 10am - 4pm, Su 12 - 4pm
    closed holidays

JOHN YOUNG MUSEUM OF ART

    directions + where to park + hours
    2500 Dole Street
    Honolulu, Hawai'i 96822

Email:  gallery@hawaii.edu
Phone: 808.956.6888

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