Two Hawaiian Scholars Receive Multiple Fellowships

Noelani Arista

Noelani Arista

Noelani Arista teaches U.S. and Hawaiian History, focusing primarily upon processes of U.S. colonialism and empire, Hawaiian governance and law. Her research brings to the fore the importance of Hawaiian oral traditions and Hawaiian language print and manuscript archives to writing intertwined histories of U.S. and Hawai‘i. She has developed a new graduate course in Historiography that focuses on Hawai‘i, U.S. and the Pacific. She has also developed a new graduate research and methods course in Hawaiian language archives. Arista’s focus on early Hawaiian and Euro-American encounters in both Hawai‘i and New England from the period of 1796-1840, has earned her several national fellowships: she is the Mellon Sawyer Post Doctoral Fellow at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania (one of two positions nationwide) contributing to a year-long seminar entitled “Race, Across Time and Space.” She is also the recipient of the Woodrow Wilson Post-Doctoral Fellowship. As a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, Dr. Arista was one of 21 minority faculty fellows chosen nationwide. She was also the sole nationwide recipient of the School of Advanced Research Post-Doctoral Fellowship, but chose not to accept this award.

Dr. Arista’s manuscript tentatively titled, “Histories of Unequal Measure: Euro-American Encounters with Hawaiian Governance and Law, 1793-1845,” focuses on transformations in Hawaiian governance and law and the fraught colonial historiography produced about Hawai’i and Hawaiians beginning in the early 19th century. She is also working on a translation (Hawaiian to English) of a book on Moral and Political Economy by William Richards entitled, “No Ke Kalaiaina” (1839). She is presently completing a  biography of David Malo for the forthcoming reprint of Ka Mo’o’olelo Hawai’i.

For a more complete description of Dr. Arista’s research, please click here.

 

 

Brandy Nālani McDougall

Brandy Nālani McDougall

Brandy Nālani McDougall teaches in the area of Indigenous Studies, particularly in Indigenous Literatures, Film, and Critical Theory, American Imperialism in the Pacific, and Indigenous Social Movements. She holds a PhD in English from UHM, specializing in Contemporary Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiian) Literature. Her monograph research examines how contemporary Kanaka Maoli authors employ the practice of kanoa (hiding meaning) to reference creation moʻolelo (stories/histories) and moʻokūʻauhau (genealogies), and how kaona emphasizes core cultural values, practices, and theories, while also demonstrating a cultural means of historical, cultural and spiritual pedagogy. She is also completing a manuscript of poetry.

Dr. McDougall is the sole recipient of the Kohala Center’s Mellon-Hawai‘i Postdoctoral Fellowship, an award for Native Hawaiian scholars early in their academic careers, supporting the publication of original research. The award is for $50,000 for 10 months of support. She also received the Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship, awarded to individuals who have demonstrated superior academic achievement, are committed to a career in teaching and research at the college or university level, show promise of future achievement as scholars and teachers, and are well prepared to use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students. The award is for $40,000 for 9-12 months of support.

Click here for more background on Dr. McDougall’s research.