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On this page: Collection Overview | Takie Okumura's Magic Lantern Slides Collection Contents | About the Collector, Takie Okumura | Works by Takie Okumura at Hamilton Library


Collection Overview

There are 998 lantern slides in the Takie Okumura's Magic Lantern Slides Collection. The majority of them are either 3 1/4"x3 1/4" or 4”x3 1/4" in size. They include hand-painted color illustrations, black & white photographs and hand-colored photographs. Most of them were commercially produced but some seem to have been personal creations.

The slides were donated to the Gregg Sinclair Library and the East West Center in 1965 by Mr. & Mrs. Clarence Y. Okumura, Rev. Takie Okumura’s grandchild. An acknowledgment letter sent by Dr. Minoru Shinoda, Executive Director of the Institute of Advanced Project, listed the lantern slides (4x3 1/4" glass slides) along with the books. It also indicates that a slide projector came with them. One can only assume that it was discarded due to the poor condition (badly rusted and may not be workable). The March 22, 1965 letter from Dr. Robert D. Stevens, Director of the East West Center Library, indicates that although the Japanese books went to the East West Center Library and English books to the Main Library (Sinclair), no reference was made regarding the location of the lantern slides placement. In the end, they found their home in Hamilton Library.

Educational lantern slides are influenced by the Japanese government’s promotion of various themes, such as the teaching of morality and discipline at schools. There are other categories such as well known sentimental stories, promoting loyalty, saving money, hard work ethic, respect for elders, selected Japanese history, historical figures, landmarks & places of interest, natural disasters, and underserved and disadvantaged people. Political caricatures and views are also common. The Okumura’s lantern slides include all these themes including Buddhist tales as well as stories of Christianity.

The slides of his photographs include the places he visited when he took an around the world tour in 1912, events that he participated in, and hand written Japanese translations of gospels and hymns. Signs of normal wear and tear indicate that Okumura repeatedly used the slides over the years. All the Takie Okumura’s Magic Lantern Slides were digitized and are available for teaching and research at the Library’s Digitized Collection site.

To access materials in the Takie Okumura's Magic Lantern Slides Collection at site, please read the Access Policy and make an appointment in advance. (Access Policy Japanese version)


Takie Okumura's Magic Lantern Slides Collection Contents (コンテンツ)

About the Magic Lantern Slides (幻燈板について) (pdf 253KB)
Takie Okumura's Magic Lantern Slides Images (奥村多喜衛の幻燈板) 

   A link to the Magic Lantern Slides Collection Page: leaves Japan Collection Website
Takie Okumura's Magic Lantern Slides Exhibit (奥村多喜衛幻燈板展示会)
Photos and Articles about Takie Okumura (奥村多喜衛についての写真・新聞等)


About the Collector, Takie Okumura (コレクター、奥村多喜衛について)

Takie Okumura in Japan
Takie Okumura
(奥村多喜衛) was born in 1865 in Kochi-prefecture, which is a southern island of Shikoku, Japan. His roots go back to Nagayoshi Sukezaemon Okumura, a Samurai of Kaga Province, Ishikawa-prefecture, who later moved to Tosa, Kochi-prefecture. In Japanese history, Tosa is known for many famous political leaders who were engaged in the Movement of Liberty and Democracy. Okumura spent his youth studying works by Russell, Spencer and Mill and discussing politics with his friends. In his early 20s, he converted to Christianity and was baptized in 1888. Okumura later enrolled in Doshisha University’s Theological Seminary in Kyoto as a special scholarship student. Okumura met the Gulick family (Rev. John Gulick and Oramel H. Gulick), who supported him spiritually and financially during his college years and after he moved to Hawaii.

Takie Okumura in Hawaii
After graduating from the Seminary, Okumura came to Honolulu in 1894. He started his missionary work under the Rev. Jiro Okabe at the Japanese Christian Church of Honolulu (the Nuuanu Congregational Church). A year later, Okumura took over as pastor of the Nuuanu Church. After the arrival of the first immigrants in 1868, the Japanese population grew each year. The life of immigrants and their families was harsh. While parents worked in the sugar cane fields, their children were left unsupervised under tents. It is said that hearing a little Japanese girl say, “Me…ma, hana hana. Yo konai (My mama is at work. Cannot come)”(p. 163, Taiheiyo no rakuen [Paradise of the Pacific]) in a broken form of English, Hawaiian, and Japanese, strongly motivated Okumura to address the urgent need of educating the Japanese immigrants’ children.


As an Educator
Okumura was an influential educator. He established a Japanese kindergarten and the Honolulu Japanese Elementary School (later Hawaii Chuo Gakuin or the Central Institute, see also school textbooks used by the school), and secured funds, textbooks, and supplies while teaching Japanese parents about the importance of education. Further, Rev. and Mrs. Okumura opened their home as a boarding school known as the Okumura Boys’ and Girls’ Home around 1896. Many second generation Japanese immigrants (Nisei) who studied at the Okumura Home went on to pursue higher education. The 1953 newspaper article reported that the Okumura “Home had many men and women who became doctors, lawyers, engineers, dentists, teachers, public principals, businessmen, soldiers and army officers.” Okumura Home students also assisted Okumura in many of his projects later on in Hawaii.

Takie Okumura and Makiki Christian Church
According to Okumura’s biographical writing, “Oncho shichijunen (1936),” the empty land was purchased for $40,000 in 1930. He planned the Makiki Christian Church modeled after the Kochi Castle in his hometown. When some Hawaiian Board members seriously questioned such a militaristic symbol being used for a church, Okumura cited that a Christian feudal lord, who erected a castle in Japan in 1560 “as a place to worship the Lord of Heaven, or the Christian God.” The Board heard his explanation and unanimously endorsed the plan.

Chronology of Takie Okumura
1865
Born in Kochi Prefecture in Japan
1888
Baptized in Osaka, Japan
1890 Enrolled in Doshisha University Theological Seminary
1894 Arrived in Honolulu, started working under Rev. Jiro Okabe at the Nuuanu Congregational Church
1895 Opened a kindergarten for Japanese children at the Queen Emma Hall. Succeeded Rev. Okabe at the Nuuanu Congregational Church
1896 Opened a Japanese language school at the Queen Emma Hall, Established "Okumura Home" (a boarding school for Japanese immigrants' children)
1899 Began Hawaii Chuo Gakuin (Honolulu Japanese Elementary School)
1990 Participated in establishing the Japanese Benevolent Hospital (a predecessor of Kuakini Medical Center), Organized a Japanese boy's baseball team "JBS", Founded the Japanese YMCA
1901 A two-story facility of Okumura Home was built in Kukui
1904 Organized the Makiki Christian Church
1906 Helped establish the Mid-Pacific Institute by sending students from Okumura Home
1912 Made an around the world tour
1921-1930 Engaged in the campaign to resolve the Japanese-American relations program in Hawaii
1925 Published a report "The Solution to the Japanese-American Relation Problem in Hawaii"
1927-1941 Organized the New Americans Conference
1932 The Makiki Christian Church modeled after Kochi Castle (Takie's hometown) was completed
1951 Passed away at the age of 86

Works by Takie Okumura at Hamilton Library (ハミルトン図書館所蔵奥村多喜衛作品)

A collection of sermons
Okumura Bokushi sekkyoshu (奥村牧師説教集)
Rakuen ochiba (楽園おち葉) [The falling leaves of paradise]
Oncho shichijunen (恩寵七十年) [Seventy years of divine blessings] 1935
Oncho shichijunen (恩寵七十年) [Seventy years of divine blessings] 1937
Oncho shichijunen (恩寵七十年) [Seventy years of divine blessings] 1940
Seventy years of divine blessings
Kansha no shogai (感謝の生涯)
Rakuen soshi (樂園叢誌)
Shinko gojunen (信仰五十年) [Fifty years of my faith]
Hawai ni okeru Nichi-Bei mondai kaiketsu undo (布哇に於ける日米問題解決運動) 1928
Hawai ni okeru Nichi-Bei mondai kaiketsu undo (布哇に於ける日米問題解決運動) 1935
Hawai ni okeru Nichi-Bei mondai kaiketsu undo (布哇に於ける日米問題解決運動) 1937
Oncho kiyaku (恩寵規約)
Future of Hawaiian-born youths, part I
Taiheiyo no rakuen (太平洋の楽園) [The paradise of the Pacific] 1919
Taiheiyo no rakuen (太平洋の楽園) [The paradise of the Pacific] 1926
Taiheiyo no rakuen (太平洋の楽園) [The paradise of the Pacific] 1930
Hawaii’s American-Japanese problem: a campaign to remove causes of friction between the American people and Japanese. Report of the campaign January, 1921 to December, 1921
Hawaii’s American-Japanese problem: a campaign to remove causes of friction between the American people and Japanese. Report of the campaign January, 1921 to January, 1927
Rakuen jiho (楽園時報) [Paradise times]
Thirty years of Christian mission work among Japanese in Hawaii
Nichiyo kowa (日曜講話) [Sunday sermons]
Sekdai isshu ehagaki tsushin(世界一周繪はがき通信) [Picture post cards from the world]

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Contact: Tokiko Yamamoto Bazzell
Japan Specialist Librarian
e-mail: tokiko@hawaii.edu
Asia Collection, University of Hawaii at Manoa Library
2550 The Mall, Honolulu, HI 96822 U.S.A.