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BTH JOB AND WORK HOURS


 

 

Q1. How do I apply for a Bridge to Hope job?
Q2. I’m already working, do I have to participate in Bridge to Hope?
Q3. I’m waiting to be referred to First-to-Work, what do I do?
Q4. What kinds of Jobs are available with Bridge to Hope?
Q5. How much do Bridge To Hope jobs pay?
Q6. How does the 20-hour FTW education option work?
Q7. Do 2-parent (TAONF) families have the same work requirements?
Q8. I have 15 credits, how many hours do I need to work?
Q9. Do volunteer hours count towards my First-to-Work requirement?
Q10. What is “classroom contact hours?”
Q11. How many credits is fulltime?
Q12. What if I drop a class? Can I increase my work hours to make up the difference?
Q13. I have a 3-credit Internship for 10 hours per week. How do I count my hours?
Q14. How many hours can I work on Bridge to Hope?
Q15. When do I get paid?
Q16. Why didn’t I get my paycheck?
Q17. When are timesheets due?
Q18. How many hours do I need to work over academic breaks?
Q19. My work site is closed over Winter Break, how can I meet my work requirements?
Q20. I had “good cause” for not working 20 hours, but my childcare is reduced. Why is that?
Q21. I’m not sure I will pass a class. Should I drop it to maintain my grade point?

 

Q1. How do I apply for a Bridge to Hope job?

Q2. I’m already working, do I have to participate in Bridge to Hope?
  • No. BTH is a voluntary program. If you are currently meeting your work requirements and your employment is convenient for attending school that is good. However, if your current job interferes with your class schedule or your employer expects you to work more hours than is necessary for FTW, you may consider switching to on-campus BTH employment.
    All FTW participants enrolled at a UH campus (even if working off campus) are encouraged to contact the BTH campus contact if they have any problems with their educational activities or with First-to-Work. BTH offers student support services as well as campus employment.
Q3. I’m waiting to be referred to First-to-Work, what do I do?
  • If you have been referred to First to Work and you are currently meeting your work requirements, you can “self refer” to the First-to-Work office nearest you (see State Government pages in phone book). Call and tell them you have been referred to FTW, are enrolled at UH and wish to participate in the next orientation session.
Q4. What kinds of Jobs are available with Bridge to Hope?
  • Bridge to Hope provides funding for on-campus student employment. Available jobs depend on the campus needs and the students’ skills. While BTH funds a student, we ask the site supervisor to provide the necessary training, supervision and work expectations consistent with all student employees. While the funding for a BTH student is different, the job expectations are not. We ask offices to consider that BTH students are single parents and understand that a sick child will necessarily mean students will not be able to work while their child is sick. Depending on the age of the child, this can happen more or less frequently. BTH and FTW encourage students to develop back-up childcare plans (plans b & c).
    BTH cannot guarantee anyone a work placement related to their academic interests. For your initial job placement, you can expect a job that does not conflict with your academic schedule.
    Many are “student assistant” positions in offices performing clerical work.
    Some campuses have more opportunities for work directly related to the students’ interests. If a BTH student is able to develop a work placement of interest to them, they should discuss this with their BTH campus contact.
Q5. How much do Bridge To Hope jobs pay?
  • Bridge to Hope employment is student employment. All jobs are paid according to the UH student employment pay schedule which is related to the job being performed and the skills needed for the job.
Q6. How does the 20-hour FTW education option work?
  • If a student is unable to pursue education under VET or JST, this is an option that can be discussed with your case manager. VET and JST must be used before pursuing this option. Student must be full-time enrolled and a minimum of 4 hours of paid employment is also required to meet a minimum of 20 hours.
    If you are enrolled fulltime for 12 credits, you need 8 hours of paid employment to meet the FTW 20-hour per week work requirement (12 + 8 = 20). There is a minimum requirement of 4 hours of paid employment per week. The calculation is: Classroom hours + paid employment = 20 hours.
    Download the First-to-Work Education Policy here.
Q7. Do 2-parent families have the same work requirements?
  • No. Hours depend on whether both or only 1 adult is required to work. Check these charts for more details.
Q8. I have 15 credits, how many hours do I need to work?
  • If you are using Job Skills Training, you will need to work 20 hours per week. The 15 classroom hours will meet your 32 hours per week. If you are using VET (limited to 12 months) your 15 hours of class and 15 hours of study hall = 30 hours total. You would need to work a minimum of 2 hours per week. Check these charts for more details.
Q9. Do volunteer hours count towards my First-to-Work requirement?
  • Yes. Supervised volunteer work and paid employment are both “core” activities. The volunteer work must be arranged with “First-to-Work,” and verified by supervisors’ signature.
Q10. What is “classroom contact hours?”
  • This is the amount of time that you are scheduled to be in the classroom. It is related to credit hours but can be more. For example, if you are enrolled in a 1 credit lab which meets for 3 hours a week, your “classroom contact hours” are 3 not 1. You would count the 3 hours of class, not the 1 credit hour towards your weekly work activities.
Q11. How many credits is fulltime?
  • At the University of Hawai’i, during the regular academic year, 12 credits is considered fulltime for undergraduates. During Summer session, rules can vary among campuses. At UH Manoa 6 credits per summer session is considered full-time. Ultimately, the educational institution & program determine what is considered “fulltime.”
Q12. What if I drop a class? Can I increase my work hours to make up the difference?
  • Once your credit load falls below 12, you are no longer a full time student. This means your work requirements would increase to 32 hours per week and you would not be eligible for Bridge to Hope employment. Dropping below fulltime enrollment may also affect your Financial Aid.
Q13. I have a 3-credit Internship for 10 hours per week. How do I count my hours?
  • If your combined classroom and internship hours equal or exceed 32, you will meet the work requirement. Count the 10 hours per week plus any classroom contact; this will exceed the 3-credits hours, so don’t count them for your Internship. For example, if all your classes plus the internship equal 22 hours per week.
    A course that requires “volunteer” hours must have them listed in the course syllabus as required (not optional, not extra credit) and then you may count them towards your work activities.
    If a practicum is required for your degree (e.g. nursing, social work) then it is also countable towards work activities. If you are in the Nursing, Dental Hygiene or other program with extensive
    practicum requirements, contact BTH (956-8059) for assistance in coordinating your work and school hours.
Q14. How many hours can I work on Bridge to Hope?
  • BTH employment is available to meet the 20 Core hours. Students who do not need to work 20 hours are encouraged to work enough hours to meet FTW requirements and utilize other hours for study and time with family without jeopardizing their academic success.
    While BTH understands that participants need to maximize their earnings, research indicates that working more than 12 hours per week has a negative impact on students’ time for academic achievement. Student parents are encouraged to spend additional time with family and studying.
Q15. When do I get paid?
  • Pay dates are the 5th and 20th of every month. If these dates fall on a weekend, you will be on paid the previous workday (e.g. if the 5th is a Saturday, you will be paid on Friday the 4th). Student employment is lagged 4 weeks. For example, a timesheet submitted on Sept. 20, will be paid on Oct. 20. Your initial paycheck can take 6-8 weeks from your initial date of hire.
Q16. Why didn’t I get my paycheck?
  • If you did not turn in your timesheet when required, your timesheet is held and combined with the next one. For example, if you missed the Sept. 20 due date and submitted on the 28th, your timesheet will be combined with your Oct 05 timesheet and both will be paid on Nov. 5th. The total number of hours worked is combined and cannot be delineated by time period for your FTW caseworker. Use a copy of your timesheet to do that. Your pay stub should be information for your MERF (monthly eligibility report form). In order to avoid this inconvenience, be diligent about submitting your timesheet on time!
Q17. When are timesheets due?
  • UH uses an online timesheet system. Usually, timesheets are due on the 5th and 20th of each month, the same date as payday.
    Because payroll, BTH, FTW and DHS all use the payroll information for different but related reporting about the BTH program, it is very important that your timesheet be submitted regularly and on schedule. Accumulations of payroll across months and budgeting periods are not acc
    eptable.
Q18. How many hours do I need to work over academic breaks?
  • First-to-Work expects students to substitute/increase paid employment or volunteer hours during academic breaks. IF you do not have access to childcare to achieve your 32 hours per week, this may be “good cause” for not achieving the full number of hours per week.
    Remember! Your childcare reimbursement is calculated on 97 hours of activities per month. There is no “good cause” for not meeting activity requirements for child
    care reimbursements. Your childcare subsidy will be reduced if your work hours do not meet 97 in the month (approx. 24 hrs per week).
Q19. My work site is closed over Winter Break, how can I meet my work requirements?
  • Discuss this with your First-to-Work case manager. You can develop a volunteer placement for the winter break. Some FTW offices have clients volunteer in their office. If you are going to volunteer, try to set up something that is useful for your career interests, or perhaps volunteer at your child’s school.
    Remember, FTW requirements and childcare reimbursement are calculated separately. You can have a “good cause” exemption from your work requirement, but that means you will not meet the hours needed for full childcare reimbursement.
    If your worksite is unavailable contact your BTH campus contact and discuss your options.
Q20. I had “good cause” for not working 20 hours, but my childcare is reduced.
Why is that?

  • Work requirements and childcare reimbursements are similar but calculated separately. While you may have “good cause” for not working (work unavailable) there is no “good cause” for maintaining childcare reimbursements. Each month’s reimbursement is based on the number of hours you were involved in work activities and would require childcare.
Q21. I’m not sure I will pass a class. Should I drop it to maintain my grade point?
  • If you are having difficulty with a course, consult with your instructor and also your Bridge to Hope campus contact about your options before making decisions to drop classes. Tutoring or other assistance may be available. If you drop a class, the increased 32-hour work requirement will leave even less time for coursework and might negatively impact your remaining courses.

 

Disclaimer: These pages are intended to be informative and answer basic questions about U.H. Bridge to Hope and the First-to-Work Education Policy. However, only First-to-Work can definitively interpret their program policies. It is always good to maintain communication with your case manager(s).