this month at the center

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The New Oceania Literary Series presents Pacific Islander & African American poets Terisa Siagatonu, Janae Johnson, Jessica Carpenter, Kamden Hilliard

Date: December 6, 2016
Time: 3:30-4:30pm
Place: Hālau O Haumea Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies

Sponsors: Native Hawaiian Student Services, the American Studies Department, the Center for Pacific Islands Studies & the English Department


Author Bios:

Terisa Siagatonu
is an award-winning poet, arts educator, and therapist, born and rooted in the San Francisco Bay Area. Her presence in the spoken-word world as a queer Samoan womyn activist has granted her opportunities to perform in places ranging from the White House to the UN Conference on Climate Change in Paris, France. The most memorable moment in her career was receiving President Obama’s Champion of Change Award (2012) for her activism as a spoken word poet/organizer in her Pacific Islander community. Her work has been featured on CNN, NBC News, NPR, Huffington Post, Everyday Feminism, The Guardian, BuzzFeed, and Upworthy.

Janae Johnson is a black, queer, spoken-word poet, teaching artist, educator and co-founder of both The House Slam poetry venue in Boston, Massachusetts, & The Root Slam poetry venue in Oakland, California. Janae's work has appeared on the PBS NewsHour, ESPN, and Blavity, and in Kinfolks: a journal of black expression. She is a two-time Women of the World Finalist, the 2015 Women of the World Poetry Slam Champion, as well as the 2015 National Poetry Slam Champion.

Jessica Carpenter is a Native Hawaiian, born and raised on Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi. Her family comes from Pālolo Valley. She studies English literature with an emphasis on Pacific literature and creative writing at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. She hopes to become an avid spoken-word and published poet.

Kamden Hilliard reads for Gigantic Sequins, edits Jellyfish Magazine, and goes by Kam. They got love from The National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts (NFAA), The Ucross Foundation, Vertebral Subluxation Complex (VSC), Lambda Literary, and Callaloo. The author of two chapbooks—Distress Tolerance (Magic Helicopter Press, 2016) and Perceived Distance from Impact (Black Lawrence Press, 2017), Kam stays busy. Find their poems and essays in The Black Warrior Review, West Branch, Muzzle Magazine, The Hawaii Review, and other sunspots.

 

Refer to the series flyer or contact ethnobio@hawaii.edu for more information.


 

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