Some Sources to Consult • Major Journals

The Third and Fourth Levels of the University ("Menzies") Library store the main collections of the "Social Sciences & Humanities" section where the above sources are to be found. The staff are located on Level Three, along with the Information Desk, catalogues, serials and photocopying facilities. You should become familiar with the main print and electronic indexes of literature in the field, and use them to supplement the recommended reading provided. The staff in the Social Sciences and Humanities Library will assist you in researching your work and you should take one of the tours of the library early in the year to familiarise yourself with its resources.

Using additional sources in your work for this subject not only makes your work more interesting, but also relieves the pressure on the few, selected sources in Open Reserve. Works not on reading lists that you have found through your own research are much easier to obtain.

The journals in the UNSW Library most relevant to your studies of the Pacific Islands are the following:

SQ990.05

14

Islands Business, Vol. 17 (1991) +

This publication has changed names twice, but remains a combination news magazine and political commentary journal of the contemporary Pacific, published in Fiji. Not surprisingly, articles emphasise commerce and economic development.

GP995.005

4

S995.0005

4A

Journal of the Contemporary Pacific, Vol 1, no 1/2 (Spring/Fall 1989) +

The Center for Pacific Islands Studies (CPIS) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa publishes this journal, which focuses on contemporary events and the history that led up to them. There is a periodic roundup of news and political events in various parts of the Pacific that is useful for keeping up. As it publishes only two volumes per annum, coverage sometimes is a bit behind. The journal is useful especially for the American dominated Pacific Islands, north of the equator.

S990.5

1

Journal of Pacific History, Vol. 1 (1966) +

Published by the Department of Pacific and Southeast Asian History, Research School of Pacific Studies, at The Australian National University, Journal of Pacific History deals with the history of the (mainly South) Pacific, including both pre–contact and more contemporary events. The book reviews and annual bibliography are useful especially to anyone wishing to specialise in this area.

S996.05

1

Journal of the Polynesian Society, Vol. 1 (1892) — Vol. 50 (1941); Vol. 75 (1966) +

This New Zealand published journal is an absolute necessity for anyone seeking to study a Polynesian topic. The articles vary in quality, from those of the interested amateur, particularly in the early days, to contributions from the best in the field. The articles tend to be long and highly detailed. There is a small book review section. Coverage includes both pre-contact and historical topics.

S572.99406

2

Mankind, Vol. 1 (1931–1935) +

Published usually three times per year, this is the second oldest journal of anthropology in Australia. It is produced by the Anthropological Society of New South Wales, the editor being in the Department of Anthropology at The University of Sydney. The ethnographic focus tends to be on the western Pacific and Southeast Asia, with a good book review section, specialising in Australian work.

In 1990, Mankind became TAJA, The Anthropological Journal of Australia.

S572.99406

1

Oceania, (Vol. 1 (1930–1931) +

This quarterly journal is published by "Oceania Publications" at The University of Sydney, an institution separate in funding from the Department of Anthropology at that institution. The articles deal mostly with Aboriginal and Melanesian topics, with a small book review section.

GP700.9905

1

Pacific Arts: The journal of the Pacific Arts Association Nš 13/14 (1996) +

The Pacific Arts Newsletter started in about 1990 and this new name was adopted more recently. Articles and news of events about the arts of the Pacific.

S338.09905

4

Pacific Economic Bulletin Vol 1, Nš 1 (July 1986) +

The National Centre for Development Studies at The Australian National University publishes this economics journal which does contain articles on the Pacific Island, as well as Asian economies.

SQ996.05

1

SM

3443

GP996.05

1A

Pacific Islands Monthly, irregular coverage from 1930

This journal, once known as "the planter’s Bible" started in Sydney in 1930 and continues to this day, but comes out of Suva. At various times, indexes have been produced, but there is an enormous bulk of primary material in the pages of this journal about the Pacific Islands and, especially, the Europeans who inhabit it. In more recent times, especially since independence of many countries from the 1960s, Islanders themselves have come to take prominent roles in the Pacific and this publication. It is worth going into for details on various Pacific places with, even, ethnographic observations.

S300.5

42

Pacific Perspective Vol 1 (1972) – v. 14 Nš 1 (1985)

This journal was published by the Institute of Pacific Studies of the University of the South Pacific and contains many articles by both students and academics at that institution. The journal ceased publication in 1985 and was never replaced. Perhaps it represents a view of an era in Pacific development.

GP990.05

8A

S990.05

8

Pacific Studies, Vol 1, no 1 (Sept 1977) +

The Laie Campus of Brigham Young University, Hawaii, produces this journal of mixed articles, from history to anthropology, political science to folklore. In spite of its place of publication, there is no noticable influence from the journal’s sponsors the Mormons.

S950.05

10

Pacific Viewpoint, Vol. 1, no 1 (1960) – v. 36, no 2 (1995)

This journal is identified mostly as featuring articles in the discipline of geography, but it contains materials published by researchers in other disciplines. In 1995, there was a name change to Asia Pacific Viewpoint.

S572.99406

2

TAJA. The Anthropological Journal of Australia, Vol. 1 (1990)+

TAJA replaced Mankind in 1990. Published three times per year, this is the second oldest journal of anthropology in Australia. It was produced by the Anthropological Society of New South Wales, the editor for the last decade or so being in the Department of Anthropology at The University of Sydney. Since 1997, TAJA has become the official journal of the Australian Anthropological Society. The ethnographic focus tends to be on the western Pacific and Southeast Asia, with a good book review section, specialising in Australian work.


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