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HHB122 Colonialism and Independence in the Asia-Pacific

 

Credit Points      :

12

Status                :  

Elective, Semester 2 2002

Pre-requisites    :  

Nil

Location   :           

Lectures; Tuesday 9.00-11.00 , C320 in Week 1 and Weeks 11-13; in Weeks 2-10 at 10.00-11.00 in C320.  Tutorials; Week 2-10 on Tuesday, 8.00-10.00 (C319), 12.00-2.00 (R301) and 2.00-4.00 (R302), Carseldine Campus

Coordinator        :  

Dr Max Quanchi, School of Humanities and Human Services, Room E319 , Tel: 38644519 (A/H 32177565 or 0402042879); FAX  07-38644719;   Email:  m.quanchi@qut.edu.au

                

 

1            Rationale

 

The assumption of foreign rule and colonialism in all its forms - Protectorate, Condominium, Crown Colony, Mandate, Trusteeship, Compact, Free Association, Commonwealth, Pays Outre Mer, Territory and Statehood – affected all Islands and archipelago in Oceania during the 19th C and continues into the 21st C. Foreign rule, by invitation or by possession continues in West Papua, New Caledonia, Wallis and Futuna, American Samoa, French Polynesia, Easter Island, Hawaii, Guam and CNMI. Decolonisation has not been achieved by all entities.  The gaining of self-government and then independence has been described as a return of sovereignty. The Oceania of 1840 (at the time of the first annexation – of Aotearoa/NZ by Great Britain) is amazingly different yet in many ways similar to the Oceania of the new millennium, despite the arrival and departure of foreign rule. The end of colonialism and the gaining of Independence have not necessarily brought prosperity and security or strengthened cultural traditions but post-independence Oceania is dynamic, changing and complex and continues to entangle the histories of several European, Asia and Latin American powers with old and new polities and entities across the region. In 2002 this unit focuses on Oceania. It is offered as an elective in the International and Global Studies, Society and Change and History discipline majors.

 

Related Pacific Island History Units;

HHB122  Colonialism and independence in the Asia-Pacific

HHB242  Culture contact in the Pacific

HHB243  The Pacific since 1945

HHB245  Australia and the Pacific Islands

HHB248  USA in the Asia-Pacific

HHB320  Independent Project (1) (by fieldwork in Tonga and Samoa)

 

2            Objectives

 

At the end of this unit students will be able to;

i.          identify major patterns in the history of colonialism and independence

ii.            understand the global context of  nationalism and post-colonialism in Pacific microstates

iii.         apply appropriate research methodologies for the investigation of issues

iv.         argue and present material in an articulate, coherent and referenced manner

 

3            Content

 

Annexation and the loss of sovereignty

Imperialism, Colonialism, independence – the global context

Case studies from Oceania – Fiji, Vanuatu, West Papua,

Colonial practice; Netherlands, Indonesia, France, Germany, Japan, Britain, USA,

Australia, New Zealand, Chile

Indigenous responses

Decolonisation and nation status

 

4            Approaches to teaching and learning

 

This unit is offered as a series of thirteen weeks of lectures, tutorials and student presentations. To achieve the objectives students will undertake a sequenced program that incorporates debates in historiography, methodology and research, film, documentaries and archival evidence. There will be an emphasis on shared-learning, as well as independent study and teacher-learner interaction. 

 

6            Plagiarism and Copied Papers

 

Unethical and dishonest practices will not be tolerated.  Plagiarism, copied papers and cheating are such offences.  Plagiarism, as defined in the QUT Handbook, is the act of taking and using another person’s work as one’s own.  Note also that students who copy each other’s papers are engaged in a form of cheating, and the original – as well as all copies – of a paper will be subject to penalties.  The University has formal disciplinary procedures that will be followed in these circumstances (for further details refer to the 2002 QUT Handbook)

 

7            Availability for Examinations

 

The School expects that students will make themselves available for examinations both during teaching time and in the examination period following the conclusion of classes.  Applications for Examinations outside specified times will only be accepted in exceptional circumstances and involve the lodging of the appropriate form – QUT forms for ‘deferred exams’ for centrally based exams and the School form for School based exams including mid-semester exams.  Claims for such circumstances must be accompanied by appropriate substantiating documentation such as: doctors’ certificates that indicate the nature and duration of a medical condition; statutory declarations that indicate a significant problem and letters from employing authorities etc. Students may make applications for up to two sets of deferred/early examinations in their course career – that is, they can only seek deferred/early exams for some or all of their units in two semesters.  Further applications for deferred/early examinations (beyond the two sets allowed) will be thoroughly scrutinised.  Such students will be required to provide additional documentation and attend a meeting with the Undergraduate Studies Coordinator and or Head of School to discuss their circumstances.  When such applications are successful, students may be required to take the exam(s) during the examination period in the next (following) semester.

 

8          Late Submission of Assignments

 

Extensions of time for assignment submission will only be granted in exceptional circumstances.  To seek an extension, students must lodge an Extension Request Form and direct it to the appropriate Unit coordinator.  These forms are available from the School office and on line from the School website.  Extensions should be sought as early as possible in the semester and prior to the submission date.  When faced why extraordinary circumstance, students should lodge an Extension Request Form as close to the submission date as possible.  Requests for extensions must be lodged in hard copy at the School Office and be accompanied by supporting documentation such as Doctor’s Certificates which indicate the nature and duration of medical conditions; statutory declarations which indicate significant problems; and letters from employing authorities, etc.  Lecturers may also require that such documentation include evidence of work that the student has completed on the assignment for which the extension is sought. Late submissions – i.e., assessment items submitted after the due date without an extension of time - will be penalised as follows:

·        Assignments submitted within 5 working days following the due date – a deduction of 10% per day of the marks due for that assessment item;

·        Assignments submitted within 6 or more working days after the due date will not be accepted.

 

9          Non-Discriminating Language

 

Students are expected to use non-discriminatory, inclusive language in all assessment and learning situations.  Students should ensure that written and oral language does not devalue, demean or exclude individuals or groups on the basis of attributes such as gender, disability, culture, race, religion, sexuality, age or physical appearance.

 

10            Assessment

 

Assessment items offer an opportunity to present orally (in seminar format) and complete written examinations (short answer mid-semester test and essay format final examination). All items must be submitted to obtain a grade of “4” or better. All items are an individual assignment. Three assessment instruments will be utilised, addressing the Objectives, and weighted as follows:

  • Short answer Test - 30% (relates to objectives 1, 2, 4)
  • Oral presentation – 30% (relates to objectives 3 and 4)
  • Final examination – 30% (relates to objectives 2, 3, 4)

The examination is a summative assessment of concepts, understanding, knowledge and skills developed during the unit. Formative assessment occurs throughout the unit, but particularly in the consultation, drafting, presentation and feedback associated with the student discussions and formal essay.

 

11            Student Presentation

 

The presentation in weeks 3-10 is an individual or paired assignment of 50 minutes (30%).  If presented in pairs the presentation is worth 20% and each student submits an individual 500-word summary of the chapter/essay in the week following the presentation (10%). See below for the list of essays/chapters for the student presentations. The topics range across different scholarly dimensions of the annexation-colonialism-independence spectrum. The presentation is an oral activity, but visual materials may be used to support the analysis of the topic and to initiate involvement by the class.

 

Criteria for the student seminar presentation

N M S G H O            Introduced the author, topic and key elements of debate

N M S G H O             Demonstrated knowledge of the topic

N M S G H O            Demonstrated knowledge of wider contexts and related material

N M S G H O             Engaged the class (through structured activity) in debate or discussion

N M S G H O             Summarised the key elements

N M S G H O             Presented in a logical, structured and coherent manner

 

Criteria for 500 word summary

N M S G H O            Identify the author’s topic and main theme

N M S G H O            Summarise the author’s main arguments and evidence

N M S G H O            Write in a logical, articulate manner

 

Code to symbols

            N   Unsatisfactory                            M   Unsatisfactory -minimal performance

            S   Satisfactory performance   G    Satisfactory- good performance

            H   Satisfactory- very good     O    Satisfactory- outstanding performance

 

Topics (also see schedule below for dates)

 

1             Campbell IC, “The politics of annexation”, in his A history of the

 Pacific Islands, UQP, 136-48, 1989  

2                      Macdonald B, “Self determination and self government”, JPH, 17,

51-61, 1982

3                      Davison J, “From dependency to independence”, JPH, 8, 158-70, 1

4                      Scarr D, “Colonial experiences and styles 1874-1943” in his The

 History of the Pacific Islands, Macmillan, 233-81, 1990

5                      Bennett J, “Across the Bougainville Strait; commercial interests and

 colonial rivalry c1880-1930”, JPH, 35,1, 67-82, 2000           

6             Thompson R, “Commerce, Christianity and colonialism; the

 Australasian New Hebrides Company 1883-1897”, JPH, 6,

25-38, 1971

7                      Swinden G, “The natives appear restless tonight; HMAS Adelaide and

 the punitive expedition to Malaita 1927” in Stevens D, ed,

 Maritime power in the twentieth century; the Australian

experience, Allen and Unwin, 54-67, 1998

8                      Campbell IC, 1998, “Anthropology and the professionalism of colonial

administration in Papua and new Guinea”, JPH, 33, 1, pp.69-90

9             Morton H, “Remembering freedom and the freedom to remember;

Tongan memories of independence” in Mageo JM, ed, Cultural memory; reconfiguring history and identity in the postcolonial Pacific, UHPress, 37-57, 2001

10                    Firth S, “Sovereignty and independence in the contemporary Pacific”,

  TCP, 1, 1, 75-96, 1989

11                    Nero K, “The end of insularity” in Denoon D, et.al, eds, The

 Cambridge history of the Pacific Islanders, CUP, 1997

12                    Thomas N, “Fear and loathing in the South Pacific; colonial and

postcolonial history in popular fiction”, in his In Oceania; visions, artefacts, histories, Duke University Press, 156-70, 1997

13                    Teaiwa T, “Microwomen; US colonialism and Micronesian women

activists” in Rubinstein D, ed, Pacific History, University of Guam, 125-42, 1992

14                    Thomas N, “Partial texts; representation, colonialism and agency in

 Pacific History”, JPH, 25, 139-58, 1990           

 

12        Mid-semester Test and Final Examination

 

i.          Mid-semester test (Week 10, in class, 50 minutes, 30%). The test includes short answer questions based on the introductory lectures and the case studies in weeks 1-9.

 

ii.          Final examination (in Examination Period TBA, 3 hours, 40%) The examination includes three compulsory essay questions, one each on the three Special Lecture Topics in weeks 11-13.

 

13            Resource Materials

 

i.            Colonial rule and decolonisation – general

 

Aldrich R, “The decolonisation of the Pacific Islands”, Iterario, 3-4, 173-91, 2000

Bennett J, “Across the Bougainville Strait; commercial interests and colonial rivalry c1880-1930”, JPH, 35,1, 67-82, 2000

Bertram G, “The political economy of decolonisation and nationhood in small pacific societies” in Hooper A, et.al. eds, Class and culture in the South Pacific, USP/IPS, 16-29, 1978

Campbell IC, “The politics of annexation”, in his A history of the Pacific Islands, UQP, 136-48, 1989

Campbell IC, “Priorities in colonial policies”, in his A history of the Pacific Islands, UQP, 156-69, 1989

Campbell IC, “Colonial consolidation”, in his A history of the Pacific Islands, UQP, 170-85, 1989

Campbell IC, “Attaining independence”, in his A history of the Pacific Islands, UQP, 197-211, 1989

Campbell IC, 1998, “Anthropology and the professionalism of colonial administration in Papua and new Guinea”, JPH, 33, 1, pp.69-90

Crocombe R and Ali A, eds, Foreign forces in Pacific politics, USP/IPS, 1983

Crocombe R, “From ascendency to dependency; the politics of Atiu”, JPH, 2, 97-111, 1967

Darwin J, “Decolonisation and world politics” in Lowe D, ed, Australia and the end of empires, Deakin University Press, 7-24, 1996

Davison J, “The decolonisation of Oceania”, JPH, 6, 133-50, 1971

Davison J, “From dependency to independence”, JPH, 8, 158-70, 1973

Denoon D, Mein-Smith P and Wyndham M, “Decolonisation?” in their A history of Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific, Blackwells,  390-408, 2000

Firth S, “The rise and fall of decolonisation in the Pacific”, in Denoon D, ed, Emerging from empire? Decolonisation in the Pacific, ANU, 10-21, 1997

Firth S, “Sovereignty and independence in the contemporary Pacific”,  TCP, 1, 1, 75-96, 1989

Firth S, “Decolonisation” in Borofsky R, ed, Remembrance of Pacific pasts; an invitation to remake history, UH Press, 314-31, 2000

Hempenstall P, “Releasing the voices; historicizing colonial encounters in the Pacific” in Borofsky R, ed, Remembrance of Pacific pasts; an invitation to remake history, UH Press, 43-61, 2000

Hezel F, “Recolonising Islands and decolonising history” in Rubinstein D, ed, Pacific History, University of Guam, 63-68, 1992

Hezel F, “Conquest culture and colonial culture in the Marianas during the Spanish period” Gunson N, ed, The changing Pacific; essays in honour of HE Maude, OUP, 247-60, 1978

Kennedy PM, “Germany and the Samoan tridominium 1889-98” in Moses J and Kennedy PM, eds, Germany in the Pacific and Far East 1870-1914, UQP, 89-114, 1977

Knight MP, “Britain, Germany and the Pacific 1880-87” in Moses J and Kennedy PM, eds, Germany in the Pacific and Far East 1870-1914, UQP, 61-88, 1977

Lamour P, “Whose initiative; getting out or pushing out” Denoon D, ed, Emerging from empire? Decolonisation in the Pacific, ANU, 204-8, 1997

Larmour P, “The decolonisation of the Pacific Islands” in Crocombe R, ed, Foreign forces in Pacific politics, USP/IPS, 1985

McCall G, “France, Rapanui and Chile; la colonisation manqueé and uncertain sovereignty” in Talu A and Quanchi M, eds, Messy entanglements, PHA, 149-66, 1995

Macdonald B, “Self determination and self government”,  JPH, 17, 51-61, 1982

Macdonald B, “Decolonisation and beyond; the framework for post-colonial relationships in Oceania” JPH, 21, 115-26, 1986

Morton H, “Remembering freedom and the freedom to remember; Tongan memories of independence” in Mageo JM, ed, Cultural memory; reconfiguring history and identity in the postcolonial Pacific, UHPress, 37-57, 2001

Munro D, “Patterns of colonial rule” in Quanchi M and Adams R, eds, Culture contact in the Pacific, CUP, 114-125, 1993

Naidu V, “The path to independence” in Quanchi M and Adams R, eds, Culture contact in the Pacific, CUP, 126-144, 1993

Nero K, “The end of insularity” in Denoon D, et.al, eds, The Cambridge history of the Pacific Islanders, CUP, 1997

Petersen G, “Decolonisation; the highest form of imperialism” in Denoon D, ed, Emerging from empire? Decolonisation in the Pacific, ANU, 73-89, 1997

Scarr D, “Movement and change in the Pacific Islands” in Livingston WS and Louis WR, eds, Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands since the First World War, ANU, 187-202, 1979

Scarr D, “Questions of sovereignty 1840-1922” in his The History of the Pacific Islands, Macmillan, 185-232, 1990

Scarr D, “Colonial experiences and styles 1874-1943” in his The History of the Pacific Islands, Macmillan, 233-81, 1990

Scarr D, “Searching for sovereignty in the South Pacific 1962-80” in his The History of the Pacific Islands, Macmillan, 310-33, 1990

Stevens D, ed, Maritime power in the twentieth century; the Australian experience, Allen and Unwin 1998 (see chapters by Overlack, Stevens, and Swinden)

Swinden G, “The natives appear restless tonight; HMAS Adelaide and the punitive expedition to Malaita 1927” in Stevens D, ed, Maritime power in the twentieth century; the Australian experience, Allen and Unwin, 54-67, 1998

Teaiwa T, “Microwomen; US colonialism and Micronesian women activists” in Rubinstein D, ed, Pacific History, University of Guam, 125-42, 1992

Thomas N, Colonialism’s culture; anthropology, travel and government, MUP 1994

Thomas N, “Partial texts; representation, colonialism and agency in Pacific History”, JPH, 25, 139-58, 1990

Thomas N, “Fear and loathing in the South Pacific; colonial and postcolonial history in popular fiction”, in his In Oceania; visions, artefacts, histories, Duke University Press, 156-70, 1997

Thompson R, “Winds of change in the South Pacific” in Lowe D, ed, Australia and the end of empires, Deakin University Press, 161-72, 1996

Thompson R, “Independence for some Pacific Islands 1945-1980” in his The Pacific basin since 1945, Longmans, 153-95, 1994

Thompson R, “Commerce, Christianity and colonialism; the Australasian New Hebrides Company 1883-1897”, JPH, 6, 25-38, 1971

Young R, “Colonialism and the desiring machine”, in his Colonial desire; hybridity in theory, culture and race, Routledge, 159-82, 1995

 

ii            Indigenous response to colonial rule

 

Campbell IC, “NZ and the Mau in Samoa; re-assessing the causes of a colonial protest movement”, NZJH, 33,1, 92-110, 1999

Chappell D, “The forgotten Mau; anti-Navy protests in American Samoa 1920-1935”, Pacific Historical Review, 69, 2, 217-60, 2000

Curtin CD, “Non-European resistance and the European withdrawal” in his The world and the west; The European challenge and the overseas response in the age of empire, CUP,  195-12, 2000

Denoon D, ed, Emerging from empire? Decolonisation in the Pacific, ANU, 22-25, 1997 (see Chps 19-25 “Decolonising the mind”)

Hauofa E, “The Ocean in us”, TCP, 10,2, 392-410, 1998

Hempenstall P, “Native resistance and German control policy in the Pacific; the case of Samoa and Ponape” in Moses J and Kennedy PM, eds, Germany in the Pacific and Far East 1870-1914, UQP, 209-33, 1977

Hempenstall P, Pacific islanders under German rule; a study in the meaning of colonial resistance, ANU, 1978

Hereniko V, “Indigenous knowledge and academic imperialism” in Borofsky R, ed, Remembrance of Pacific pasts; an invitation to remake history, UH Press, 78-91, 2000

Trask H, “Natives and anthropologists; the colonial struggle”, TCP, 3,1, 159-67, 1991

Teaiwa T, “bikinis and others/pacific n/oceans”, TCP, 6,1, 876-109, 1994

 

iii            New Zealand and the Pacific

 

Boyd M, “Colonel Tate and Samoan resistance after the 1918 influenza epidemic”, JPH, 15, 155-74, 1980

Campbell IC, “Staffing native administration in the Mandated Territory of Samoa”, NZJH, 34, 2, 277-95, 2000

Crocombe R, “New Zealand and other Pacific Islands; changing economic, social and political relations” in Rubinstein D, ed, Pacific History, University of Guam, 293-310, 1992

Gilson RP, The Cook Islands 1820-1950, IPS/USP, 1980

Haas A, “New Zealand; Pacific Island or metropolitan power?” in Crocombe R and Ali A, eds, Foreign forces in Pacific politics, USP/IPS, 99-111, 1983

Howe KR, “Samoa” in his Where the waves fall, Allen and Unwin, 230-54, 1984

Liua’ana B, “Who made Western Samoa independent?” in Denoon D, ed, Emerging from empire? Decolonisation in the Pacific, ANU, 40-46, 1997

Malama Meleisea, et.al., “Preparation for independence” in Meleisea M, ed, Lagaga; a short history of Western Samoa, USP/IPS 1983

Macdonald B, “Towards a Pacific community; geopolitical and regional perspectives on New Zealand’s relationships with the small states of Oceania”, in Rubinstein D, ed, Pacific History, University of Guam, 313-22, 1992

Morell WP, “The Cook Islands and Niue; British protectorate and annexation to New Zealand” in his, Britain in the Pacific Islands, OUP, 280-96, 1960

Tagupa W, “Law, status and citizenship; conflict and continuity in new Zealand and Western Samoa 1922-1982”, JPH, 29, 19-35, 1994

 

iv            Australia, Nauru and PNG

 

Campbell IC, 2000, “The ASOPA controversy; a pivot of Australian policy for Papua and New Guinea 1945-49”, JPH, 25,1, 83-99

Davison J, “The republic of Nauru”, JPH, 3, 145-50, 1968

Denoon D, “Capitalism in Papua New Guinea” JPH, 20, 119-34, 1985

Downs I, The Australian Trusteeship; Papua New Guinea 1945-75, ANU Press 1980

Hasluck P, A time for building; Australian administration in Papua and New Guinea 1951-1963, MUP 1976

Macwilliam S, “Papua New Guinea in the 1940s; empire and legend” in Lowe D, ed, Australia and the end of empires, Deakin University Press, 25-42, 1996

Macwilliam S, “Australian companies and the challenge of decolonisation; Burns Philp” Denoon D, ed, Emerging from empire? Decolonisation in the Pacific, ANU, 134-39, 1997

Mair LP, Australia in New Guinea, MUP, 1970

Nelson H, Taim bilong masta; the Australian involvement with Papua New Guinea, ABC Books, 1982

Parker RS, “Appraising the colonial record; Australia in Papua New Guinea”, in Lal BV and Nelson H, eds, Lines across the sea; colonial inheritance in the post colonial Pacific, PHA 9-24, 1995

Perkins J, “Sharing the white man’s burden; Nazi colonial revisionism and Australia’s New Guinea mandate”, JPH, 24, 54-69, 1989

Pollock N, “Nauru’s post-independence struggles” in Lal BV and Nelson H, eds, Lines across the sea; colonial inheritance in the post colonial Pacific, PHA 49-56, 1995

Pollock N, “Nauru; decolonising, recolonising – but never a colony” Denoon D, ed, Emerging from empire? Decolonisation in the Pacific, ANU, 102-6, 1997

Rosenwarne S, “Ruling the region”, in Lee J and Burgmann V, eds, A most valuable acquisition; a peoples history of Australia since 1788, Penguin, 1988

Rowley CD, The Australians in German New Guinea 1914-21, MUP, 1958

Shand D, “Australia; the intermediate umbrella” in Crocombe R and Ali A, eds, Foreign forces in Pacific politics, USP/IPS, 87-98, 1983

Thompson R, Australia in the Pacific Islands in the Twentieth Century, Scholarly Publishing, 1998

Thompson R, “Edge of empire; Australian colonisation in Nauru 1919-1939” in Rubinstein D, ed, Pacific History, University of Guam, 273-80, 1992

Thompson R, “Making a mandate; the formation of Australia’s New Guinea policies 1919-25”, JPH, 25, 68-84, 1990

Waiko J, A short history of Papua New Guinea, OUP, 1993

West F, “An Australian moving frontier in New Guinea” in Gunson N, ed, The changing Pacific; essays in homnour of HE Maude, OUP, 214-27, 1978

 

v             France and the Pacific

 

Anon., “Book review Forum; France in the South Pacific”, Pacific Studies, 18, 3, 119-46, 1995

Cordonnier I, “The French government and the South Pacific during cohabitation” Pacific Studies, 18, 1, 79-102, 1995

Henningham S, “Keeping the tricolour flying; the French Pacific into the 1990s”,  TCP, 1, 1, 97-133, 1989

Howe KR, “Chiefs, Church and State”, in his The Loyalty Islands; a history of culture contacts 1840-1900, ANU, 55-85, 1977

Miles WFS, “Francophonie in post-colonial Vanuatu”, JPH, 29, 1, 49-65, 1994

Morrell WP, “the partition of the Pacific; Great Britain and France” Morrell WP, Britain in the Pacific Islands, OUP, 187-204, 1960

Scarr D, ed, France in the Pacific; past, present and future, (special issue of JPH, 26, 2, 1991)

 

vi            Germany and the Pacific

 

Bennett J, “Holland, Britain and Germany in Melanesia”, in Howe KR, Kiste RC and Lal BV, eds, Tides of history; the Pacific Islands in the 20th century, Allen and Unwin, 1994

Biskup P, “Foreign coloured labour in German New Guinea; a study in economic development”, JPH, 5, 85-107, 1970

Bollard AE, “The financial adventures of JC Godefroy and Son in the Pacific”, JPH, 16, 3-19, 1981

Brown RG, “The German acquisition of the Caroline Islands 1898-99” in Moses J and Kennedy PM, eds, Germany in the Pacific and Far East 1870-1914, UQP, 137-55, 1977

Hempenstall P, Pacific islanders under German rule; a study in the meaning of colonial resistance, ANU, 1978

Hiery H, The neglected war; the German South Pacific and the influence of World War 1, University of Hawaii Press, 1995

Firth S, “German firms in the Pacific Islands 1857-1914” in Moses J and Kennedy PM, eds, Germany in the Pacific and Far East 1870-1914, UQP, 1977

Firth S, “German labour policy in Nauru and Angaur 1906-14”, JPH, 13, 36-52, 1978

Morrell WP, “The partition of the Pacific; the impact of Germany” in his Morrell WP, Britain in the Pacific Islands, OUP, 205-63, 1960

Moses I, “The extension of colonial rule in Kaiser Wilhelmsland”,  in Moses J and Kennedy PM, eds, Germany in the Pacific and Far East 1870-1914, UQP, 288-312, 1977

Moses J, “the Coolie labour question and German colonial policy in Samoa 1900-1914” in Moses J and Kennedy PM, eds, Germany in the Pacific and Far East 1870-1914, UQP, 234-61, 1977

Munro D, “German labour policy and the partition of the Western Pacific; the view from Samoa”, JPH, 25, 85-102, 1990

Overlack P. “Australasia and Germany; challenge and response before 1914” in Stevens D, ed, Maritime power in the twentieth century; the Australian experience, Allen and Unwin, 22-39,  1998

Spennemann D, “Japanese poaching and the enforcement of German colonial sovereignty in the Marshall islands”, JPH, 33, 1, 51-68, 1998

 

vii            Japan and Micronesia

 

            Ballendorf D, “Secrets without substance; US intelligence in the Japanese Mandates

                         1915-35, JPH, 9, 83-99, 1983

Barber L and Henshall K, The last war of empires; Japan and the Pacific war 1941-45, David Bateman, 1999

Higuchi W, “Japan and war reparations in Micronesia”, JPH, 30,1, 87-98, 1995

Higuchi W, “The Japanisation policy for the Chamorros of Guam”, JPH, 36, 1, 10-36, 2001

Nishino T, “Japan; the risen sun” in Crocombe R and Ali A, eds, Foreign forces in Pacific politics, USP/IPS, 112-29, 1983

Peattie M, Nan’yō; the rise and fall of the Japanese in Micronesia 1885-1945, University of Hawaii press, 1988

            Purcell D, “The economics of exploitation; the Japanese in the Mariana, Caroline and

                         Marshall Islands 1915-1940”, JPH, 11, 189-211, 1976

                        Schwalbenberg HM and Hatcher T, “Micronesian trade and foreign assistance;

                        contrasting the Japanese and American colonial periods”, JPH, 29, 1, 95-104, 1994

Spennemann D, “Japanese poaching and the enforcement of German colonial sovereignty in the Marshall islands”, JPH, 33, 1, 51-68, 1998

 

viii            Spain and the Pacific

 

Driver MG, “From conquest to colonisation; Spain in the Mariana Islands”, JPH, 23, 137-55, 1988

 

ix            Britain and the Pacific

 

Bach J, “The Royal navy in the Pacific Islands”, JPH, 3, 3-20, 1968

Bennett J, “Holland, Britain and Germany in Melanesia”, in Howe KR, Kiste RC and Lal BV, eds, Tides of history; the Pacific Islands in the 20th century, Allen and Unwin, 1994

Douglas B, “Imperial flotsam? The British in the Pacific Islands” in Winks RW, ed, Oxford History of the British Empire; Historiography, OUP, 366-78, 1999

Frazer I, “Decentralisation and postcolonial State in the Solomon Islands” in Lal BV and Nelson H, eds, Lines across the sea; colonial inheritance in the post colonial Pacific, PHA 95-110, 1995

Heath I, “Charles Morris Woodford; adventurer, naturalist, administrator” in Scarr D, ed, More Pacific Island Portraits, 193-210, ANU, 1978

Howe KR, “Fiji”, in his Where the waves fall, Allen and Unwin, 255-80, 1984

Latukefu S, “Tonga at independence and now” in Lal BV and Nelson H, eds, Lines across the sea; colonial inheritance in the post colonial Pacific, PHA, 57-68, 1995

Macdonald B, “Grimble of the Gilbert Islands; myth and man” in Scarr D, ed, More Pacific Island Portraits, 211-30, ANU, 1978

Macdonald B, Cinderellas of empire; towards a history of Kiribati and Tuvalu, ANU, 1982

Morrell WP, Britain in the Pacific Islands, OUP, 1960

Thompson R, “Messy entanglements in British and Australian decolonisation in the Pacific 1960-1963” in Talu A and Quanchi M, eds, Messy entanglments, PHA, 167-74, 1995

Trask H, “Cultures in collision; Hawaii and England 1778”, Pacific Studies, 7, 91-117, 1983

Wood-Ellem E, “Queen Salote and the British dual mandate policy” in Denoon D, ed, Emerging from empire? Decolonisation in the Pacific, ANU, 22-25, 1997

 

ix            USA and the Pacific

 

Friedman H, “Races undesirable from a military point of view; United States cultural security in the Pacific Islands 1945-1947”, JPH, 32, 1, 49-70, 1997

Gaffaney T, “Linking colonisation and decolonisation; the case of Micronesia”, Pacific Studies,  18, 2, 23-60, 1995

Hanlon D, “The first years of the Micronesian Mission on Ponape 1852-1859”, JPH, 19, 41-59, 1984

Petersen G, “Why is Micronesian independence an issue” in Lal BV and Nelson H, eds, Lines across the sea; colonial inheritance in the post colonial Pacific, PHA 69-82, 1995

Statham R, “The US Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands; a paradox of independent dependency” Denoon D, ed, Emerging from empire? Decolonisation in the Pacific, ANU, 90-101, 1997

Spennemann D, “The United States annexation of Wake Atoll, Central pacific Ocean”, JPH, 33, 2, 239-48, 1998

Stewart WH, “The influence of history on the CNMI’s relationship with the United States and the areas recent development”, Journal of the Pacific Society, 82, 3, 1-27, 1999

 

x             Special lecture topic (1) Britain and Fiji

 

Davidson J, “Constitutional change in Fiji”, JPH, 1, 165-8, 1966

Etherington N, “The gendering of indirect rule; criminal law and colonial Fiji 1875-1900”, JPH, 31, 1, 42-57, 1996

Gillion K, Fiji’s Indian migrants; a history to the end of indenture in 1920, OUP 1962

Gillion K, The Fiji Indians; challenge to European dominance 1920-1946, ANU 1977

Heath I, “Arthur Hamilton Gordon in Fiji”, JPH, 9, 81-92, 1974

Knpaman, B, “Capitalism’s economic impact in colonial Fiji 1847-1939, JPH, 20, 66-83, 1985

Lal BV, Broken waves; a history of the Fiji islands in the Twentieth century, University of Hawaii Press, 1992

Lal BV, “Managing ethnicity in colonial and post-colonial Fiji” in Lal BV and Nelson H, eds, Lines across the sea; colonial inheritance in the post colonial Pacific, PHA 37-48, 1995

Legge J, Britain in Fiji 1858-1880, Macmillan 1958

Morrell WP, “The Crown Colony of Fiji” in his Britain in the Pacific Islands, OUP, 361-99, 1960

Scarr D, Fiji; a short history, Allen and Unwin, 1984

Scarr D, “John Bates Thurston; Grand panjandrum of the Pacific”, in Scarr D, ed, More Pacific Island Portraits, 95-114, ANU, 1978

Thomas N, “Fiji” in his Colonialism’s culture; anthropology, travel and government, MUP, 107-25, 1994

 

xi            Special lecture topic (2) Netherlands, Indonesia and West Papua

 

Ballard C, ed, Historical perspectives on West New Guinea, (special issue of JPH, 34, 2 1999;  see articles by Ballard, Pouwer, Giay, Ploeg and Poulgrain)

Bennett J, “Holland, Britain and Germany in Melanesia”, in Howe KR, Kiste RC and Lal BV, eds, Tides of history; the Pacific Islands in the 20th century, Allen and Unwin, 1994

Van den Broek T and Szalay A, “Raising the Morning Star; six months in the developing independence movement in West Papua”, JPH, 36,1, 77-92, 2001

Broeze F, “A second-hand discovery; the Netherlands and the Pacific in the first half of the 19th century”, JPH, 10, 3-4, 3-47, 1975

Chauvel R, “The emergence of the West New Guinea dispute” in Lowe D, ed, Australia and the end of empires, Deakin University Press, 7-24, 1996

Doran S, “Toeing the line; Australia’s abandonment of traditional West New Guinea policy”, JPH, 36, 1, 5-18, 2001

Pouwer J, “The colonisation, decolonisation and recolonisation of West New Guinea” JPH, 34, 157-80, 1999

 

xii            Special lecture topic (3) France and New Caledonia

 

Bobin F, “Caldoches, metropolitans and the mother country”, JPH, 26, 303-12, 1991

Chanter A, “Will there be a morning after?; the colonial history of the media in New Caledonia”, JPH, 34, 1, 91-108, 1999

Connell J, New Caledonia or Kanaky? The political history of a French colony, ANU Press 1987

Douglas B, “Conflict and alliance in a colonial context; case studies in New Caledonia 1853-1870”, JPH, 15, 21-51, 1986

Maclellan N, “The Noumea accord and decolonisation in New Caledonia”, JPH, 34, 3, 245-52, 1999

Small D, “Prospects for New Caledonia; the challenge of Ouvea” in Denoon D, ed, Emerging from empire? Decolonisation in the Pacific, ANU, 22-25, 1997

Toth S, “Colonisation or incarceration? The changing role of the French penal colony in fin-de-siecle New Caledonia”, JPH, 34, 1, 59-74, 1999

Ward A, “The independence movement and the plan Dijoud in New Caledonia”, JPH, 15, 193-9, 1980  


14            Schedule of Lectures and tutorials                                                              

HHB122 Colonialism and independence in Asia-Pacific            2 2002

___________________________________________________________________

Week  Date                Lecture 2 hrs (9.00-11.00, C320)

 

1          16 Jul               Introduction, major themes, assessment

___________________________________________________________________

 

Week  Date                Lecture (I hr)             Tutorial/Seminars 2 hrs

                                    (10.00-11.00)

 

2          23 Jul               Asia-Pacific             Introductory Tut

                                    compared

 

3          30 Jul               Annexation to               1  Campbell, Politics of annexation 

                                    decolonisation               2  Macdonald, Self determination and …

 

4          6 Jul                 New Zealand                        3  Davison,  From dependency …

                                                                        4  Scarr, Colonial experiences and ….

 

5          13 Jul               Australia                      5  Bennett, Across the Bougainville …

                                                                        6  Thompson, Colonialism and ……

 

6          20 Jul               Japan                           7  Swinden, The natives appear …..

                                                                        8  Campbell, Anthropology and ….

 

7          27 Jul               Germany                      9   Morton, Remembering freedom …                                                                   10  Firth, Sovereignty and ….

 

8          3 Sep               France                          11  Nero, The end of insularity

                                                                        12  Thomas, Fear and loathing …..

 

9          10 Sep             USA                            13   Teaiwa, Microwomen and ….

                                                                        14   Thomas, Partial texts ….

___________________________________________________________________

 

10        17 Sep             Class Test (2 hrs, 9.00-11.00)                

___________________________________________________________________

Week  Date                Special lectures             (8.00-11.00)

 

11        24 Sep             (1) An ideal colony; Britain in Fiji 1875-1970

 

*          1 Oct               University mid-semester vacation

 

12        8 Oct               (2) Invasion, plebiscite and freedom in West Papua

 

13        15 Oct             (3) From “Troubles” to Accord; France and New Caledonia

 

*            Examination (in Examination period, TBA)

 

 

 

Student presentation

 

Criteria for the student seminar presentation

 

Introduced the author, topic and key elements of debate

Demonstrated knowledge of the topic

Demonstrated knowledge of wider contexts and related material

Engaged the class (through structured activity) in debate or discussion

Summarised the key elements

Presented in a logical, structured and coherent manner

 

Criteria for 500-word summary

 

Identify the author’s topic and main theme

Summarise the author’s main arguments and evidence

Write in a logical, articulate manner

 

Code to symbols

 

N   Unsatisfactory                                  M   Unsatisfactory-minimal performance

S    Satisfactory performance               G    Satisfactory- good performance

H   Satisfactory- very good                 O    Satisfactory- outstanding performance

Upload: 4/14/2003


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