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HUB619                        CULTURE CONTACT IN THE PACIFIC

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Semester                      1 - 2001

Credit Points                 12 points, 3 contact hours per week

Status                           Elective

Pre-requisities               Nil

Coordinator                    Dr Max Quanchi, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, 

Room E319, Carseldine campus

                                    Tel:  61-07-38644519 (Bus),  61-07-32177565 (AH),  

FAX 61-07-38644719;   Email: m.quanchi@qut.com

Day, Campus                Tuesdays, 9.00am-12.00pm, E125, Carseldine

______________________________________________________________________________

 

1.   RATIONALE

The meeting of Pacific Islanders and Europeans was remarkable for the people of both cultures.  Both groups had to accommodate and respond to new behaviors, values and morality, as well as new and challenging technologies, cosmologies and socio-economic organization.  These first contact meetings began in 1513 with Balboa’s sighting of a large “peaceful” ocean and then Magellan’s voyage across the Pacific in 1521. These voyages and discoveries of each other, by both Pacific Islanders and Europeans, continued through to the twentieth century. This unit builds upon the general concepts that are central to the Humanities and Social Sciences; assumptions of global or universal nature; the impact of western and non-western cultural heritages; and the challenge and response of cultural changes and continuities.  The key concepts are developed through empirical case studies as well as theoretical and historiographic approaches.  The unit is designed to develop a keener appreciation of the multiplicity of and the contested meanings of history.  As the central theme is an appreciation of time and place the unit relies on language, discourse, methodologies and interpretations from the discipline of history. Related methodologies from anthropology and other social sciences are also applied.

 

Related Units;

HUB610  Approaches to Asia-Pacific Studies

HUB620  The Pacific since 1945

HUB627  Australia and the Pacific Islands

HUB954  Independent Study (by fieldwork)

 

2.        AIM

To develop an understanding of the cultures of the peoples of the Pacific Islands, the histories of cross-cultural encounters and the processes by which these histories have been recorded.

 

3.        OBJECTIVES

At the completion of the unit students should be able to;

 

(i)               describe and make generalizations about the histories of Europe, Australia and Oceania.

(ii)         critically analyze interpretations of contact between Pacific Islanders and Europeans.

(iii)        apply the techniques of historical research to the  investigation of an issue

(iv)        argue in a structured,  informed manner about their own culture and others

 

4.        ASSESSMENT

There are three items of assessment.  Each item is an individual submission (unless noted). All items must be submitted to gain a pass grade of “4” or better. Essays should be submitted at the Carseldine CASS office. (Submission by FAX is not acceptable). Students are advised to consult the University Rules regarding plagiarism.

(a)     Seminar presentation and paper: (30%)

Lead and engage the class in discussion on topic from seminar program. (Note; If sharing a seminar topic with a partner, 20% is allocated to the presentation and each student submits an additional 500 word paper summarizing the author’s contribution to the topic, worth 10% of the grade.) Students are advised to consult with the Lecturer regarding format and content prior to presenting. Due in weeks 7-14 as allocated

 

Criteria for the student seminar presentation

N M S G H O            Introduced the subject matter, topic and key elements of debate

N M S G H O       Demonstrated knowledge of the topic

N M S G H O      Demonstrated knowledge of wider contexts and related material

N M S G H O       Engaged the class (through structured activity) in debate or discussion

N M S G H O       Summarised the key elements

N M S G H O       Presented in a logical, structured and coherent manner

 

 

(b)     Essay.  (30%)  

An essay of 2000 words on the contribution to “First contact” studies by one of the historians listed below. The essay should analyse and compare the approach taken in two case studies by the historian. Other works by the same historian may be utilised. The case studies should be analysed in the context of the wider scholarship on this field. Due Friday 27 April

 

Len Bell, 1999, “Looking at Goldie; face to face with ‘All ’e Same T’e Pakeha”, in N Thomas and D Losche, eds, Double Vision, Cambridge, CUP, pp.163-192

Len Bell, 1999, “Augustus Earle’s The meeting of the artists ….” In Calder A, Lamb J and Orr B, eds, Voyages and beaches; Pacific encounters 1769-1840, Honolulu, UH Press, pp. 241-64

Or

Ian Campbell, 1982 "Polynesian perceptions of Europeans in the 18th and 19th centuries" Pacific Studies, Vol 5, No 2, pp.64-80

Ian Campbell, 1997, “Culture contact and Polynesian identity in the European Age” in Journal of World History, Vol 8, pp.29-55

Or

David Chappell, 1994, “Secret sharers; indigenous beachcombers in the Pacific Islands”, PS, Vol 17, No 2, pp.1-22

David Chappell, 1992, "Shipboard relations between Pacific Island women and...”, JPH , Vol 27, No 2, pp.131-149

Or

Greg Dening, 1980, “Names and places”, in Islands and beaches; discourse on a silent land Marquesas 1774-1880, Honolulu, UH Press, pp.9-34

Greg Dening, 1999,  “The hegemony of laughter; Purea’s theatre” in A Frost and J Samson, eds, Pacific empires; essays in honour of Glyndwr Williams, Melbourne, MUP, pp.127-46

Or

Robin Fisher, 1979, ”Cook and the Nootka”, in R Fisher and H Johnston, eds, Captain James Cook and his times, Canberra, ANU Press, pp.81-98

Robin Fisher, 1999, “Vancouver’s vision of native peoples; the northwest coast and Hawaii” in A Frost and J Samson, eds, Pacific empires; essays in honour of Glyndwr Williams, Melbourne, MUP, pp.147-64

Or

       Jane Samson, 1998, “White savages” in Imperial benevolence; Making British authority in the Pacific Islands, Honolulu, UH Press, pp.24-41

Jane Samson, 1999, “An empire of science; The voyage of The Herald 1845-1851” in A Frost and J Samson, eds, Pacific empires; essays in honour of Glyndwr Williams, Melbourne, MUP, pp.69-86

Or

Anne Salmon, 1991, “Marion de Fresne in the Bay of Islands” in Two worlds; first meetings between Maori and Europeans 1642-1772, Auckland, Viking, pp.359-430

Anne Salmon, 1997, “Tamatea (Dusky Sound)”, in Between worlds; early meetings between Maori and Europeans 1773-1815, Auckland, Viking, pp.45-64

Or

Bernard Smith, 1992, “Portraying Pacific peoples”, in Imagining the Pacific; In the wake of Cook’s voyages, MUP, Melbourne pp.77-110

Bernard Smith, 1992,  “Constructing Pacific peoples”  in Imagining the Pacific; In the wake of Cook’s voyages, MUP, Melbourne, pp.193-212

Or

       Nicholas Thomas, 1989, “The indigenous appropriation of European things” in Entangled objects; exchange, material culture and colonialism in the Pacific, Harvard Uni Press, Cambridge pp.83-124

       Nicolas Thomas, “Liberty and license; the Forster’s accounts of New Zealand sociality” in Calder A, Lamb J and Orr B, eds, Voyages and beaches; Pacific encounters 1769-1840, Honolulu, UH Press, pp.132-55

 

        Criteria for the Essay

        N M S G H O          Identify the subject matter, topic and key elements of debate

  N M S G H O    Relate topic to wider historical contexts, events and themes

  N M S G H O       Demonstrated knowledge of the topic

  N M S G H O    Identify the historians’ sources, views and conclusions

  N M S G H O       Conclude by offering a personal response and summarising the topic

  N M S G H O       Respond in logical, structured and coherent manner

  N     S             Apply appropriate referencing and bibliography

 

(c)     Examination; (40%)

Two questions of equal value (a summative essay on “contact histories” and a critical analysis of an unsighted first contact account.) Three hours.  Examination period

 

The standard QUT allocation of percentage grades for each level from 1 – 7 is applied.

Code to symbols

            N   Unsatisfactory                                        M   Unsatisfactory -minimal performance

            S   Satisfactory performance                      G    Satisfactory- good performance

            H   Satisfactory- very good                       O    Satisfactory- outstanding performance

 

 

 

5.        Texts (both available QUT Bookshop, Carseldine)

 

Borofsky Robert, 1999, ed, Remembrance of Pacific pasts; an invitation to remake history, Honolulu, UH Press

HUB610 Culture Contact; Readings 1/2001

 

6         REFERENCES  and general reading on "First Contact"

 

Adams R, 1992, "European discovery or multiple discoveries" in Quanchi M and Adams R (eds) Culture contact in the Pacific, Melbourne, CUP (Chps 3 and 4)

Altman I and Butler R, 1994, “The contact of cultures; perspectives on the Quincentenary” (of Columbus in the Americas in1492), American Historical Review, April 1994, pp.478-503

Anderson A, 1998, The welcome of strangers ; an ethnohistory of Southern Maori AD 1650-1850, Dunedin, University of Otago Press

Babich J, 1996, Making peoples; a history of the New Zealanders from Polynesian settlement to the end of the Nineteenth Century, Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press (Chps 5, 6 and 7)

Barber IG, 1999, “Early European contact and understanding ... the Grass Cove conflict” in Calder A, Lamb J and Orr B, eds, 1999, Voyages and beaches; Pacific encounters 1769-1840, UH Press, Honolulu pp.156-79

Bell L, 1992, Colonial constructs; European images of Maori 1840-1914, Auckland Uni Press, Auckland

Bell, L, 1999, “Looking at Goldie; face to face with ‘All ’e Same T’e Pakeha”, in N Thomas and D Losche, eds, Double Vision, Cambridge, CUP, pp.163-192

Bell, L, 1999, “Augustus Earle’s The meeting of the artists ….” In Calder A, Lamb J and Orr B, eds, Voyages and beaches; Pacific encounters 1769-1840, Honolulu, UH Press

Bitterli U, 1986/1993, Cultures in conflict; encounters between European and non-European cultures 1492-1800   Cambridge , Polity  Press (Chp 7)

Blackburn J,  1979, The white men; The first response of  aboriginal peoples to the coming of  the white man  London, Times Books

Borofsky R, 1999, ed, Remembrance of Pacific pasts; an invitation to remake history, Honolulu, UH Press (See Section 2, Chps 5-7 on “The dynamic of contact”)

Borofsky R, 1999,”Cook, Lono, Obeyesekere and Sahlins” in , Remembrance of Pacific pasts; an invitation to remake history, Honolulu, UH Press, pp.420-42

Borsboom AD, (1988), “The savage in European social thought; a prelude to the conceptualization of the divergent peoples and cultures of Australia and Oceania”, Bijdragentot de Taal-land-en Volkenkunde, Vol 144, pp.419-32

Calder A, Lamb J and Orr B, eds, 1999, “Introduction; postcoloniality and the Pacific” in Voyages and beaches; Pacific encounters 1769-1840, UH Press, Honolulu pp.1-24

Calder A, 1996, The temptations of William Pascoe Crook; an experience of cultural difference in the Marquesas”, JPH,  Vol 31, No 2, pp.144-61

Campbell IC, 1985, “Race relations in the pre-colonial Pacific Islands; a case of prejudice and pragmatism”, Pacific Studies, Vol 8, No 2, PP.61-80

Campbell IC (1982) "Polynesian perceptions of Europeans in the 18th and 19th centuries" Pacific Studies, Vol 5/2 pp.64-80

Campbell IC (1980) "Savages noble and ignoble; the preconceptions of early European voyagers in Polynesia" Pacific Studies   Vol 4/1 pp.45-59

Campbell IC (1990) A history of the Pacific Islands, Brisbane, University of Queensland Press  (See Chapter 3)

Campbell IC (1994) "European-Polynesian encounters; a critique of the Pearson thesis" JPH   Vol 29/2 pp.222-31

Campbell, IC, 1997, “Culture contact and Polynesian identity in the European Age” in Journal of World

             History, Vol 8, pp.29-55

Campbell IC, Gone native in Polynesia, Westport, Greenwood Press

Chappell DA, 1997, Double ghosts,  New York, ME Sharpe

Chappell DA (1995) "Active agents versus passive victims; decolonized historiography or problematic paradigm ?" Contemporary Pacific, Vol 7/2 pp.303-26

Chappell DA, (1994), “Secret sharers; indigenous beachcombers in the Pacific Islands”, PS, Vol 17/2, pp.1-22

Chappell DA, (1992), "Shipboard relations between Pacific Island women and...”, JPH , Vol 27, No 2, pp.131-149

Clifford J, 1997, “Travelling cultures” in Routes; travel and translation in the late twentieth century, Harvard Uni Press, Cambridge, pp.17-46

Connelly R and Anderson R, 1987, First contact; New Guinea highlanders encounter the outside world, Viking, New York

Connelly R and Anderson R, 1983, First contact, (54 min, video documentary)

Dathorne OR, 1995, “Paradise conquered” in Asian voyages; Two thousand years of constructing the other, Westport Ct, Bergin and Garvey pp.203-919

Davis M, (1992) "Colonial discourses, representations and the construction of otherness; case studies from Papua" in Rubinstein D (ed) Pacific History; Papers from the 8th PHA conference, Guam PHA/MARC pp.49-59

Daws G, (1973), “Looking at islanders; European ways of thinking about Polynesians in the 18th and 19th centuries” in Spradley G, et al, Culture learning, University of Hawaii Press

Dening G, 1980, Islands and beaches.  UH Press, Honolulu

Dening G, 1986, “Possessing Tahiti” Archaeology in Oceania, Vol 21, pp.103-18

Dening G, 1992. Mr Bligh's bad language, Melbourne, CUP

Dening G, 1996, Performances, Melbourne, MUP

Denoon D, ed, 1996, The Cambridge history of the Pacific Islanders, CUP, Melbourne

Dobyns HF, 1994, “The clash of cultures” in Burenhult G, ed, New world and Pacific Civilizations, Harper, San Francisco, pp.209-70

Douglas B, 1999, “Art as ethno-historical text; science, representation and indigenous presence in 18th and 19th century oceanic voyaging literature” in Thomas N and Losche D, 1999, eds, Double vision; art histories and colonial histories in the Pacific, CUP, Melbourne pp.65-102

Douglas B, (1989) “Varieties of academic discourse; ethnography and ethnographic history”, Unpublished paper, 8th PHA Conference, Carseldine Campus QUT, Brisbane

Fagan BM, 1996, Clash of cultures, London, Altamira Press

Eisler W, 1995, The furthest shore; Images of Terra Australis from the Middle Ages to Captain Cook, CUP, Melbourne

Eiusler W and Smith B, 1988, Terra Australis; the furthest shore, Sydney, Art Gallery of New South Wales

Fausett D, 1993, Writing the New World; imaginary voyages and Utopias of the great southern land, Uni of Syracruse Press, Syracruse

Finney B, (1994), “The other one-third of the globe” Journal of World History, Vol 5/2, pp.273-98

Fischer SR, 1993, “The calling of the HMS Seringapatam at Rapanui...” Pacific Studies, Vol 16, No 1, pp.67-84

Fisher, R, 1979, ”Cook and the Nootka”, in R Fisher and H Johnston, eds, Captain James Cook and his times, Canberra, ANU Press, pp.81-98

Fisher, R, 1999, “Vancouver’s vision of native peoples; the northwest coast and Hawaii” in A Frost and J Samson, eds, Pacific empires; essays in honour of Glyndwr Williams, Melbourne, MUP, pp.147-64

Frost A and Samson J, eds, Pacific empires; essays in honour of Glyndwr Williams, Melbourne, MUP, pp.147-64

Greenblatt S, 1991, Marvellous possessions; the wonder of the new world, Clarendon, OUP

Hanlon D, 1984, “God versus Gods ; the first years ...” JPH, Vol 19, No 1-2, pp.41-59

Hanlon D, 1984, Upon a stone altar; a history of the island of Pohnpei, UH Press, Honolulu

Hempenstall P, 1999, Releasing the voices; historicising colonial encounters in the Pacific” in Borofsky R, 1999, ed, Remembrance of Pacific pasts; an invitation to remake history, Honolulu, UH Press, pp.43-61

Henningham S, (1994), “The best specimens in all our colonial domains; New Caledonian Melanesians in Europe 1931-32”, JPH, Vol 29/2, pp.172-87

Herman D, 1999, “Race, identity and representation” in Rapaport M, ed, The Pacific islands; Society and environment, Honolulu, Bess Press, pp.156-65

Hezel F and Driver M, 1988, “From conquest to colonisation; Spain in the Marianas Islands 1690-1740”, JPH,  Vol 4, No 1, pp.45-59

Hezel F, 1983, The first taint of civilization; a history of the Caroline and Marshall    Islands in pre-colonial days 1521-1885, UH Press, Honolulu

Hohepa P, 1999, “My musket, My missionary and my mana”,  in Calder A, Lamb J and Orr B, eds, Voyages and beaches; Pacific encounters 1769-1840, UH Press, Honolulu pp.180-201

Howe KR, (1992), “The intellectual discovery and exploration of Polynesia” in Fisher R and Johnston H (eds), From maps to metaphors, University of British Columbia Press

Howe KR, 1984, Where the waves fall, Sydney, Allen and Unwin

Howe KR, 1977, “The fate of the savage in Pacific historiography”, New Zealand Journal of History, Vol 11, No 2, 137-54

Kaeppler A, (1994),”Paradise regained; the role of Pacific Museums in forging national identity” in Kaplan FES, (ed), Museums and the making of ‘ourselves”; the role of  objects in national identity, Leicester University Press, pp.19-44

Keesing R (1989) "Creating the past", Contemporary Pacific, Vol 1/1 p.19-42

Kituai A, 1999, “The role of the patrol officer in Papua New Guinea” in My gun, my brother; the world of the Papua New Guinea colonial police 1920-1960, UH Honolulu pp.19-41

Kituai A, 1999, “Deaths on the mountain; an account of police violence in the highlands of PNG” in Borofsky R, 1999, ed, Remembrance of Pacific pasts; an invitation to remake history, Honolulu, UH Press, pp.212-30

Knapman C (1993)  “Reproducing empire; Exploring ideologies of gender and race on Australia’s Pacific frontier”,  in Magarey S, Rowley S and Susan S (Eds) Debutante nation:  Feminism contests the 1890’s  Sydney, Allen and Unwin

Lacey R (1992) “Meeting strangers; Early encounters between Islanders and Intruders in the Pacific - a comparative exploration”, Unpublished paper, 10th PHA Conference, University of Canterbury, Christchurch (LAC)

Langdon R, (1992) " Sixteenth century Spanish castaways in the Caroline and Marshall Islands" in Rubinstein D (ed) Pacific History; Papers from the 8th PHA conference, Guam PHA/MARC pp.7-16

Laracy H, (1991), “The Pentecost murders; an episode in Condominium non-rule, New Hebrides 1940”, unpublished paper at the “France in the Pacific” conference, Australian National University

Linnikin J, 1991, “Ignoble savages and other visitors...” JPH, Vol 26, No 1, p.3-26

Lomas P, 1981, “The early contact period in Northern New Ireland (PNG); from wild frontier to plantation economy” Ethnohistory, Vol 28/1, pp.1-21

McBryde I, 1989, “To establish a commerce of this sort; Cross-cultural exchange at the Port Jackson settlement” in Hardy J and Frost A (Eds) Studies from Terra Australis to Australia   Canberra,  Australian Academy of the Humanities

Marshall M and LB, 1975, “Opening Pandora’s bottle; reconstructing Micronesian’s early contacts with alcoholic beverages”, JPS,  Vol 84/5, pp.441-65

Meleisea M and Schoeffel P, 1996, “Discovering outsiders” in Denoon D, ed, 1996, The Cambridge history of the Pacific Islanders, CUP, Melbourne, pp.119-51

Moore C, 1991, “The life and death of William Bairstow Ingham; PNG in the 1870s” JRHSQ, Vol 14/10, pp.393-432

Morgan A, 1996, "Mystery in the eye of the beholder; cross-cultural encounters on 19th century Yap" JPH,  Vol 31, No 1, pp.27-41

Neumann K, 1993,  “The silences of Adelbert von Chamisso; a biographical ‘European’ cultural history”, unpublished paper.

Neumann K, 1992, “In order to win their friendship... : Rewriting First contact” , Contemporary Pacific  ,Vol 6/1, 1994, pp.111-45

Neumann K, 1992, Not the way it really was; constructing the Tolai past, UH Press, Honolulu

Nile R and Clerk C, 1996, “The Pacific and the European imagination” in Cultural atlas of Australia, new Zealand and the South Pacific, Sydney, RD Press, pp.98-123

Obeyesekere G,  (1992), The apotheosis of Captain Cook; European mythmaking in the Pacific  (see also,  Book Review  Forum,  Pacific Studies ,  Vol 17 No 2, 1994, pp.103-15

Pearson WH, 1970, "The reception of European voyagers on Polynesian islands 1568-1797" Journal de la Societe Oceanistes   Vol 26, pp.121-53

Ploeg A, 1995, "First contact, in the highlands of Irian Jaya" JPH,  Vol 30, No 2, pp.227-39

Poyer L, 1993, The Ngatik massacre; history and identity on a Micronesian island, Smithsonian Institute Press, Washington

Quanchi M, 1992, “Being discovered; perceptions and control of strangers” in  Quanchi M and Adams R, eds, 1992, Culture Contact in the Pacific , CUP,  Melbourne

Quanchi M, 1999, “Tree houses, representation and photography on the Papuan coast 1880 to 1930” in Craig B, Kernot B and Anderson C, eds, Art and performance in Oceania, Bathurst, Crawford House, pp.218-30

Radford R, 1987, Highlanders and foreigners in the Upper Ramuu; The Kainantu area 1919-1942, MUP, Melbourne 

Rennie N, 1995, Far-fetched facts; the literature of travel and the idea of the South Land, Clarendon, Oxford

Richards R, 1994, "The decision to lotu.... the spread of Christianity in Samoa" in Pacific Studies   Vol 17 No 1, pp.29-44

Richards R, 1990, “Indigenous beachcombers; the case of Tapeooe a Tahitian traveller from 1798 to 1812”, Great Circle, Vol 13/1, pp.1-13

Richards R, 1994, The decision to lotu .... the spread of Christianity in Samoa”,  Pacific Studies,  Vol 17, No 1, pp.29-44

Sagan, E, 1985, At the dawn of tyranny; the origins of individualism, political oppression and the state,  London, Faber and Faber  (See Chps 7-10 on Polynesia)

Sahlins M, 1995, How natives think; About Captain Cook, for example, Chicago, University of Chicago Press

Sahlins M, 1985, “Captain James Cook; or the dying god” in Islands of History, Chicago,    University of Chicago Press pp.104-35

Sahlins M, 1995, “Rationalities; how natives think” in How natives think; about Captain Cook for example, Uni of Chicago Press, Chicago, pp.148-89

Salmon A 1992 Two worlds; First meetings between Maori and Europeans 1642-1772, Auckland , Viking/Penguin

Salmon A, 1997, Between worlds; early meetings between Maori and Europeans 1772-1815,   Auckland , Viking/Penguin

Samson J, 1998, Imperial benevolence; Making British authority in the Pacific Islands, Honolulu, UH Press

Scarr D (1990) The history of the Pacific Islands, Sydney, Macmillan

Schieffelin G and Crittenden R, eds, 1992, Like people you see in a dream; first contact in six Papuan societies, Viking/Penguin, Auckland

Schindbeck M, 1998, “New Zealand; land of the long white cloud” in Hauser-Schaublin B and Kriger G, eds, James Cook, gifts and treasures from the South Seas, Prestel, Munich

Schutte H, 1991, “Stori bilong wanpela .....  Pacific Studies, Vol 14, No 3, pp.69-96

Smith B, (1983), “William Hodges and English plein-air painting”, Art History,  Vol 6/2,  pp.143-52

Smith B (1988) “Depicting Pacific peoples”, Alexander Turnbull Library Record, Vol 21,  No 1 pp.29-51

Smith B, 1992, Imagining the Pacific; In the wake of Cook’s voyages, MUP, Melbourne

Sutton M, 1995, Strangers in paradise; Adventurers and dreamers in the South  Seas, Angus and Robertson

Spate OHK (1988, “The Tahitian venus and the good savage”, in Paradise lost and found ; The Pacific since Magellan  pp.237-63

Spriggs M, 1999, “Pacific archaeologies; contested ground in the construction of Pacific History” JPH, Vol 34, No 1, pp.109-122

Sturma M, 1996, “Dressing and undressing in early European contact in Australia and Tahiti”, Pacific Studies, Vol 21/3 pp.87-104

Swadling P, 1996, Plumes from paradise; trade cycles in outer Southest Asia and their impact on New Guinea and nearby islands until 1920, Robert Brown, Brisbane

Thomas N and Losche D, 1999, eds, Double vision; art histories and colonial histories in the Pacific, CUP,  Melbourne

Thomas N, 1997, In Oceania; visions, artifacts, histories, Duke University Press, (See Chps 3-6)

Thomas N, 1989, “The indigenous appropriation of European things” in Entangled objects; exchange, material culture and colonialism in the Pacific, Harvard Uni Press, Cambridge pp.83-124

Thompson C, 1997, “A dangerous people whose only occupation is war; Maori and pakeha in 19th century New Zealand”, JPH, Vol 31, No 1, pp.109-19

Washbrook, DA, 1999, “Orients and Occidents; Colonial discourse theory and the historiography of the British Empire” in Winks RW, ed, Historiography; the Oxford History of the British Empire; Vol 5, Oxford, OUP, pp 596-611

Wetherell D, 1998, “First contact Mission narratives from Eastern New Guinea” JPH, Vol 33, No 1, pp.111-16

White G, 1991, “First encounters” in Identity through history; living stories in a Solomon Islands society, Cambridge, CUP (See Chp 2, pp.19-29)

Williams G, (1982), ‘Enlarging the sphere of contemplation; the exploration of the Pacific 1760-1800” in Marshall PJ and Williams G, The great map of mankind, Dent, London, pp.258-98

 

7.   TUTORIAL READINGS

 

No 1     Kerry  Howe,  1984, Where the waves fall,   Chp 16 ,  “Considering the new historiography”

           

1.         Why does Howe include the following people in his chapter on the “modern” writing of history in the Pacific ?

                        Balboa

                        George Forster

                        Cook, Bligh and Vancouver

                        Denis Diderot

                        Otto von Kutzebue

                        Herman Melville

                        Darwin

                        Stevenson, Pitt-Rivers and Malinowski

                        JC Furnas and  DL Oliver

                        Alan Morehead

                        Norma Macarthur

                        Mead, Firth,  Hogbin and Belshaw

                        JW Davison

2.         What was the “inevitable process” up to 1900 that some historians have described ?

3.         What did the overview approach of Imperial historians fail to question or overlook ?

4.         What is acculturation ?

5          Why does Howe claim that,” a history of culture contact can no longer be interpreted in terms of European imperatives?”

 

Tutorial Readings No 2  Greg Dening, 1986, "Possessing Tahiti" Anthropology in Oceania,  Vol 21, pp.103-18

 

1.         Why does Dening feel that the Bastille day Arahu Rahu  ceremonies are "meaningless empty actions" ?

2          What does the phrase mean; "Tahitian politics turned around the feather girdle"?

3          What is the difference between mnemonic  and hieroglyphic ?

4          What were the maro tea  and the maro ura  ?

5          What were the taputapuatea ?

6          Why was the tuft of Richard Skinner's hair woven into the girlde ?

7          In what ways was the mare at Tarahopi a "museum of their contact with the European stranger "?

8          Why does Dening claim the Tahitians meeting at Matavai Bay was a "coordinated and dramaticised reception"?

9          Why does Dening claim that the Dolphin's arrival at Matavai Bay was "true to the myth"?

10         How did Wallis and Furneaux "make history"?

11         What was the symbolism of the ta'ata meia roa ?

12         Why was Hawkesworth's Voyages.... so widely criticised ?

13         What were the five "sexual incidents" that attracted interest and debate ?

14         Why does Dening agree with the advertisement that claimed Omai a trip around the world   was a "school for the history of man" ?

15         Why does Dening call the history of the maro ura  a "colligation"?

 

 

Tutorial Reading No 3 Chappell DA (1995) "Active agents versus passive victims; decolonized historiography or problematic paradigm ?" The Contemporary Pacific,  Vol 7, No 2, pp.303-26

 

1          What is a dominant paradigm - give three examples from Chappell’s essay.

2          What four examples does Chappell use to show the “gift of agency” ?

3          What does Vilisoni Hereniko mean when he says “lingering hegemony”?

4          What is the “victim image” ?

5          What is the “victim-turned-agent” dialectic ?

6          What does Chappell mean by saying  “victimhood can be provocatively empowering”?

7          In Samoa was Tupua Tamesese Leolofi III an agent or a victim ?

8          Why does Chappell doubt the “binary agent-victim construct” ?

9          What evidence does Chappell offer to support his conclusion that “agents and victims are not mutually exclusive categories”?

10         What does Chappell mean when he asks for a “middle ground of interpretation”?

 

Tutorial reading No 4  Campbell IC, “European-Polynesian encounters; a critique of the Pearson thesis”,  JPH, Vol 29, No 2, pp.221-31

 

1          How does Campbell support his claim for the “ambivalence of historiographical interpretations” of early contacts ?

2          Why did a swing towards an idealist model occur ?

3          Why did a a swing towards materialist interpretations occur ?

4          In Pearson’s three responses, what were the common characteristics of contact relationships ?

5          Why is “ceremony” the key concept in Pearson’s theory on responses ?

6          What are the characteristics of conscious and deliberate “theft” ?

7          What are the characteristics of “legitimate appropriation” ?

8          What are the characteristics of  taking an item due to “curiosity” ?

9          What are the characteristics of taking an item as an exercise of “traditional rights” (on a stranger’s property) ?

10         Which side of the debate does the evidence from indigenous sources support ?

11         What does Campbell mean when he describes early contacts as being characterised by “untypical restraint” ?

12         Why does Campbell place the following phrase in italics (p.231) - “and which were practicised only in contact situations” ?

13            Campbell suggests a new paradigm - a third culture of language, universalities and set of behaviour. How does this support his claim for collaboration rather than confrontation in early contacts ?

 

8            STUDENT PRESENTATIONS

 

The reading listed for each topic indicates the general thrust of the issue to be investigated in the seminar. The general references above should also be consulted. Note; In addition to the listed reference, your seminar must demonstrate wider reading, that is,  breadth and depth of reading on the topic. For all topics, students should  consult recent issues of the

            Journal of Pacific History (JPH)

            JPH  Annual Bibliography, 

            The Contemporary Pacific (TCP)

            ISLA,  

            Pacific Studies.(PS)

Also consult CR Moore (1992) Pacific History Journal Bibiography  for an author index to sixteen of the main journals covering Pacific history (up to 1991).

 

In the seminar you need to address the following questions;

i.          What are the author's main assertions regarding the history of this event?

iii          What documents, archives, sources or literature does the author rely on ? 

iv          What is the author's contribution to historiographic debates on the  writing of  contact histories of the  Pacific ? 

v.          How can I engage the class in a discussion of these questions ?

vi          What is my opinion on the author's evidence, assertions and interpretation ?

 

Seminar topics/authors

 

1       Williams G, 1999, “To make discoveries of countries hitherto unknown …., in Frost A and Samson J, eds, Pacific empires; essays in honour of Glyndwr Williams, Melbourne, MUP, pp.13-322

2       Calder A, 1996, The temptations of William Pascoe Crook; an experience of cultural difference in the Marquesas”, JPH,  Vol 31, No 2, pp.144-61

3       Barber IG, 1999, “Early European contact and understanding ... the Grass Cove conflict” in Calder A, Lamb J and Orr B, eds, 1999, Voyages and beaches; Pacific encounters 1769-1840, UH Press, Honolulu pp.156-79

4       Morgan A, 1996, "Mystery in the eye of the beholder; cross-cultural encounters on 19th century Yap" JPH,   Vol 31, No 1, pp.27-41

5       Fischer SR, 1993, “The calling of the HMS Seringapatam  at Rapanui...” Pacific Studies, Vol 16, No 1, pp.67-84

6       Richards R, (1990), “Indigenous beachcombers; the case of Tapeooe a Tahitian traveller from 1798 to 1812”, Great Circle, Vol 13/1, pp.1-13

7       Ploeg A, 1995, "First contact, in the highlands of Irian Jaya" JPH,  Vol 30, No 2, pp.227-39

8       Hanlon D, 1984, “God versus Gods ; the first years ...” JPH, Vol 19, No 1-2, pp.41-59

9       Linnikin J, 1991, “Ignoble savages and other visitors...” JPH, Vol 26, No 1, p.3-26

10      Poyer L, 1993, “The massacre and its meaning” in The Ngatik massacre; history and identity on a Micronesian island, Smithsonian Institute Press, Washington, pp.55-76

11      Moore C, (1991), “The life and death of William Bairstow Ingham; PNG in the 1870s” JRHSQ, Vol 14/10, pp.393-432

12      Schutte H, 1991, “Stori bilong wanpela man nem bilong Toboalilu; the death of Godeffroy’s Kleinschmidt and the perception of history”, Pacific Studies, Vol 14, No 3, pp.69-96

13   Henningham S, (1994), “The best specimens in all our colonial domains; New Caledonian Melanesians in Europe 1931-32”, JPH, Vol 29/2, pp.172-87

14      Kituai A, 1999, “The role of the patrol officer in Papua New Guinea” in My gun, my brother; the world of the Papua New Guinea colonial police 1920-1960, UH Honolulu pp.19-41

 

9             Lecture, Tutorial and Student seminar schedule

 

 

Tuesday
Session 1 
Session 2    
Session 3
______________________________________________________________________________
Feb 27  First contacts/encounters/theatre/histories Course outline and assessment Great Journeys  
Mar 06 Key themes in contact  histories Questions; Howe   First Contact
Mar 13 G Dening’s ethno raphic moments Questions; Dening    Millenium
Mar 20  James Cook and the Hawaiians Questions; Chappell  Cook’s death
Mar 27 Art of the voyages Questions; Campbell Bigpela Canoe
______________________________________________________________________________
Apr 03 Drake’s Island of thieves  1 Williams “To make discoveries …” 2  Calder – Crook in the Marquesas 
Apr 10  Omai in Europe 3 Barber - Grass Cove 4 Morgan - Yap

____________________________________________________________________________                            

Apr 17              University Vacation   (Easter)

____________________________________________________________________________

Apr 24  "Falcon" massacre Pohnpei 5. Fischer - Rapanui 6. Richards - Tapeooe
May 01 "Young Dick" at  Malaita Island  7. Ploeg – West Papua 8, Hanlon – “Gods ….”
May 08 Tamate and the  Goaribari 9. Linniken – “Ignoble savages …” 10. Poyer – the Ngatik massacre
May 15 Korpe defile - PNG1930s 11.Moore – Ingham in PNG 12.Schutte – the death of Kleindschmidt
May 22 In a savage land - the movie   13. Henningham - Best  specimens 14 Kituai - Patrols
May 29 Review: Themes and interpretations, Exam preparation

______________________________________________________________________________

Jun 4-8              Study Break

Jun 9-30 Examinations  

           

 

 

HUB 619 CULTURE CONTACT IN THE PACIFIC ISLANDS

Student seminar presentations                                  1/2001

 

DATE                READING                      PRESENTER 1                         PRESENTER 2

____________________________________________________________________________________

 

APR 03             1. WILLIAMS                                                                                                       _______________________________________________________________________

                       

                        2.  CALDER

____________________________________________________________________________________

 

APR 10             3.  BARBER

                        _______________________________________________________________________

                       

                        4  MORGAN

 

 

University vacation (Easter)

 

 

APR 24             5.  FISCHER

                        _______________________________________________________________________

 

                        6.  RICHARDS

____________________________________________________________________________________

 

MAY 01                        7.  PLOEG

                        _______________________________________________________________________

 

                        8.  HANLON

____________________________________________________________________________________

 

MAY 08                        9. LINNIKIN

                        _______________________________________________________________________

 

                        10. POYER

____________________________________________________________________________________

 

MAY 15                        11. MOORE

_______________________________________________________________________

 

                        12  SCHUTTE

 

 

MAY 22                        13  HENNINGHAM

            _______________________________________________________________________

 

14     KITUAI

____________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

READINGS
CONTENTS

 

Howe KR, 1984, “considering the new historiography” in Where the waves fall, Sydney, Allen and Unwin

 

Dening G, 1986, “Possessing Tahiti”, Anthropology in Oceania, Vol 21, pp.103-18

 

Campbell IC, 1994, “European-Polynesian encounter; a critique of the Pearson thesis”, JPH, Vol 29, No 2, pp.222-31

 

Chappell D, 1995, “Active agents versus passive victims; decolonised historiography or problematic paradigm”, The Contemporary Pacific, Vol 7, No 2, pp.302-326

________________________________________________________________________

 

Calder A, Lamb J and Orr B, eds, 1999, “Introduction; postcoloniality and the Pacific” in Voyages and beaches; Pacific encounters 1769-1840, UH Press, Honolulu pp.1-24

 

Dobyns HF, 1994, “The clash of cultures” in Burenhult G, ed, New world and Pacific Civilizations, Harper, San Francisco              pp.209-70

 

Meleisea M and Schoeffel P, 1996, “Discovering outsiders” in Denoon D, ed, 1996, The Cambridge history of the Pacific Islanders, CUP, Melbourne  pp.119-51

 

Salmon A. 1992, “Surville in Tokerau (Doubtless Bay)” in  Two worlds;  First meetings betwen Maori and Europeans 1642-   1772,  Auckland , Viking/Penguin   pp.299-356

 

Altman I and Butler R, 1994, “The contact of cultures; perspectives on the Quincentenary”  American Historical Review, April 1994, pp.478-503

__________________________________________________________


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