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HHB248 The USA and the Asia-Pacific region

 

 

 

Credit Points   :  

12

Status            :

Elective, Semester 2 2002

Pre-requisites    :

Nil 

Location        :

Saturdays 20 and 27 Jul, 3, 10, 17 and 24 Aug; 9.00am-3.00pm, Room E125 (a and b), Carseldine Campus.

Note (i) A one-hour introductory lecture will be held in normal class time, Week 1, 12.00-1.00, Room L301)

Note (ii) ; This unit is offered in flexible, intensive mode over the first six Saturdays of Semester 2.

Coordinator     :

Dr Max Quanchi, School of Humanities and Human Services, Room E319, Tel: 38644519 (A/H 32177565 or 0402042879); FAX  07-38644719;

Email: m.quanchi@qut.edu.au

   

 

1        Rationale

 

The course of events in international, regional and domestic affairs in the nations and territories that comprise Asia and the Pacific Islands has been significantly affected by the policy, temporary engagement, long period of colonial rule and neo-colonial hegemony of the USA. From Manifest Destiny, the Munroe Doctrine through to the Nixon Doctrine, a USA role in the region was promoted and in the 21st C, the USA continues to be both a world power and a local presence. The USA “opened” Japan to the West, was an “Unequal Treaties” partner in China, fought wars in Korea, the southwest Pacific, Vietnam and Indo-China, held colonies, trusteeships, incorporated territories and States in the Philippines, Micronesia, Samoa and Hawaii, dropped nuclear bombs on Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Christmas Island and Bikini Atoll, refused to sign fishing treaties with small Island nations, sent “Peace Corp” volunteers and funded cultural and heritage programs. It is a complex relationship with historical and continuing significance in international and global affairs. In 2002, this unit will focus on the relationship between the USA and the Pacific Islands. It is offered as an elective in the International and Global Studies and History discipline majors.

 

Related Pacific Island History Units;

HHB122  Colonialism and independence in the Asia-Pacific

HHB242  Culture contact in the Pacific

HHB243  The Pacific since 1945

HHB245  Australia and the Pacific Islands

HHB248  USA in the Asia-Pacific

HHB320  Independent Project (1) (by fieldwork in Tonga and Samoa)

 

2        Objectives

 

At the end of this unit students will be able to;

i.        identify major patterns in the history of USA relations with Asia-Pacific

ii.       understand the global context of regional relationships between superpowers and between superpowers and microstates

iii       identify concepts, models and theoretical positions that apply to an historical understanding of international relations

iv.      apply appropriate research methodologies for the investigation of issues

v.       argue and present material in an articulate, coherent and referenced manner

 

3        Content

 

The content follows a broad chronology but is organised in themes that allows bilateral and multilateral comparison, and evolving USA policy to be studied in a “change over time” structure. The subject matter is selective rather than comprehensive, and balances an Americans-abroad approach against the global perspective of USA involvement in the wider region, sub-regions, individual nations and entities.

  • The Asia/Pacific in USA expansion westwards – an overview 1800-2000
  • Whalers, fur-sealers, Missions and scientific expeditions
  • Conquering Hawaii
  • Buying the Philippines and Guam
  • Partitioning Samoa
  • The Pacific War
  • The USA as a colonial administration – States, Compacts and Trust Territories
  • The USA as a Cold-War warrior 1945-1989
  • The USA-Pacific in literature, film and art
  • Superpower relationships with microstates
  • Pacific Islanders in the USA
  • American cultural influences – Peace Corp to Coke.

 

4        Approaches to teaching and learning

 

This unit is offered flexible, intensive mode – a one hour introductory session in scheduled class time in week 1, followed by the first six Saturdays in Semester 2, (weeks 1-6), from 9.00am-3.00pm,  at CA Campus. To achieve the objectives students will undertake a sequenced program of lectures, tutorials and student presentations that incorporate the latest research findings, film, documentaries and archival evidence. As an advanced elective, there will be an emphasis on intensive, independent, self-directed study and teacher-learner interaction. 

 

5        Plagiarism and Copied Papers

 

Unethical and dishonest practices will not be tolerated.  Plagiarism, copied papers and cheating are such offences.  Plagiarism, as defined in the QUT Handbook, is the act of taking and using another person’s work as one’s own.  Note also that students who copy each other’s papers are engaged in a form of cheating, and the original – as well as all copies – of a paper will be subject to penalties.  The University has formal disciplinary procedures that will be followed in these circumstances (for further details refer to the 2002 QUT Handbook)

 

6        Availability for Examinations

 

The School expects that students will make themselves available for examinations both during teaching time and in the examination period following the conclusion of classes.  Applications for Examinations outside specified times will only be accepted in exceptional circumstances and involve the lodging of the appropriate form – QUT forms for ‘deferred exams’ for centrally based exams and the School form for School based exams including mid-semester exams.  Claims for such circumstances must be accompanied by appropriate substantiating documentation such as: doctors’ certificates that indicate the nature and duration of a medical condition; statutory declarations that indicate a significant problem and letters from employing authorities etc. Students may make applications for up to two sets of deferred/early examinations in their course career – that is, they can only seek deferred/early exams for some or all of their units in two semesters.  Further applications for deferred/early examinations (beyond the two sets allowed) will be thoroughly scrutinised.  Such students will be required to provide additional documentation and attend a meeting with the Undergraduate Studies Coordinator and or Head of School to discuss their circumstances.  When such applications are successful, students may be required to take the exam(s) during the examination period in the next (following) semester.

 

7        Late Submission of Assignments

 

Extensions of time for assignment submission will only be granted in exceptional circumstances.  To seek an extension, students must lodge an Extension Request Form and direct it to the appropriate Unit coordinator.  These forms are available from the School office and on line from the School website.  Extensions should be sought as early as possible in the semester and prior to the submission date.  When faced why extraordinary circumstance, students should lodge an Extension Request Form as close to the submission date as possible.  Requests for extensions must be lodged in hard copy at the School Office and be accompanied by supporting documentation such as Doctor’s Certificates which indicate the nature and duration of medical conditions; statutory declarations which indicate significant problems; and letters from employing authorities, etc.  Lecturers may also require that such documentation include evidence of work that the student has completed on the assignment for which the extension is sought. Late submissions – i.e., assessment items submitted after the due date without an extension of time - will be penalised as follows:

·       Assignments submitted within 5 working days following the due date – a deduction of 10% per day of the marks due for that assessment item;

·       Assignments submitted within 6 or more working days after the due date will not be accepted.

 

8        Non-Discriminating Language

 

Students are expected to use non-discriminatory, inclusive language in all assessment and learning situations.  Students should ensure that written and oral language does not devalue, demean or exclude individuals or groups on the basis of attributes such as gender, disability, culture, race, religion, sexuality, age or physical appearance.

 

9        Assessment

 

Assessment items offer an opportunity to present orally (in seminar format), write research papers and short answer questions on specific readings and complete a written examination (essay format). All assessment will be completed by August 24 2002 (week 6).  All items must be submitted to obtain a grade of “4” or better. All items are an individual assignment. Assessment instruments will address the Objectives, and be weighted as follows:

  • Three Short answer sets of questions based on readings (3 X 5% = 15%) (in HHB248 Readings available at QUT Carseldine Bookshop.) (relates to objectives 1, 2, 5)
  • Essay (1500 words) – 25% (relates to objectives 3, 4, 5)
  • Oral presentation – 10% (relates to objectives 4 and 5)
  • Final examination – 50% (relates to objectives 1, 2, 3)

The examination is a summative assessment of concepts, understanding, knowledge and skills developed during the unit. Formative assessment occurs throughout the unit, but particularly in the consultation, drafting, presentation and feedback associated with the student discussions and formal essay.

 

Attendance at all six sessions is compulsory. (Each session is the equivalent of two weeks normal class) One or more absence incurs a penalty of 25%)

 

Summary of assessment tasks

 

1               Short answers; Ron Crocombe, “Overview; parameters of USA … “

10%  Due, Saturday 20 July 2002 (Week 1)

2        Short answers;         RC Kiste, “United States …..”

10%   Due, Saturday 27 July  2002 (Week 2)

3        Short answers;         David Hanlon, “Micronesia; writing and rewriting … “

10%   Due, Saturday 3 August 2002 (Week 3)

4        Class presentation, 10 minutes on essay topic,

                  10%   Due, Saturday 10. 17 or 24 August 2002 (Week 4, 5 or 6)

4        1500 word essay;  based on readings….                        

30%  Due, Saturday 24 August 2002 (Week 6)

5        Examination; One compulsory essay and two essays chosen from the special

 lecture topics (Weeks 3, 4 and 5), 

40% (3 hours, Saturday 24 August 2002 (9.00 -12.10)

 

Class presentation and Essay; Topic: “The USA, decolonisation and sovereignty”.

Choose one of the current or former USA territories and states (Hawaii, RMI, FSM, Palau, Guam, CNMI, American Samoa) and in the first part briefly describe the manner of acquisition, the form of colonial control, changes in the relationship over time and the issue of decolonisation or stages towards self-government/autonomy in the country chosen. (400 words) The second and major part of the essay should describe the current relationship with the USA. (800 words) The third and final part should comment on future directions in relations between the country and the USA and the wider chronology of all USA-Pacific relationships (300 words)

 

See section (xii) below under Recent events and regional commentaries for references on current events.

 

The class presentation is a progress report and summary (10 minutes) of initial opinion on the reading being taken for the essay (worth 10%) and should cover

N M S G H O                   Identify period, location and historical contexts and themes

N M S G H O                   List assertions (on OHP)

N M S G H O          Main conclusions

 

(Note; For the conclusion of your talk; read the concluding paragraph of your essay, on OHT, say 150 words)

 

The essay should cover the following; (1500 words)

N M S G H O          Identify the country and unique aspects of the relationship

N M S G H O                   Describe annexation, the nature of control, decolonisation

N M S G H O                   Comment on current and future directions

N M S G H O                   Describe the wider chronology of USA-Pacific relationships

N M S G H O                   Acknowledge supporting or contrary historical interpretations

N      S                   Appropriate footnoting, references and bibliography

 

Code to symbols

         N   Unsatisfactory                  M   Unsatisfactory -minimal performance

         S   Satisfactory performance   G    Satisfactory- good performance

         H   Satisfactory- very good     O    Satisfactory- outstanding performance

 

10      Resource Materials

 

(a)      Major Texts

 

R Crocombe, The Pacific Islands and the USA, Institute of Pacific Studies Press, Suva, 1995

Readings in USA-Pacific relations (Course Materials, HHB248) QUT, 2002

(From QUT Carseldine Bookshop) (*Compulsory)

 

(b)        References

 

i.          USA-Pacific general

 

H Albinski, “America’s future in the Pacific Islands region”, Journal of the Pacific Society, 16, 4, 14-25, 1994

R Bell, T McDonald and A Tidwell, eds, Negotiating the Pacific century; the new Asia, the United States and Australia, Allen and Unwin 1996

JI Brookes, International rivalry in the Pacific Islands 1800-1875, Russell and Russell 1969

M Borthwick, Pacific century; the emergence of modern Asia-Pacific, Westview Press 1992

G Boughton and P Leary, eds, A time of change; relations between the US and American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Marianas, Puetro Rico and the US Virgin Islands, University of Guam 1994

G Daws, A dream of islands; voyages of self-discovery in the South Seas, Jacaranda, 1980 (see chp 3 on Herman Melville and chp 4 on Walter Murray Gibson)

J Dalton, “An anlaysis of the Solarz report” in Rubinstein D, ed, Pacific History, University of Guam, 323-30, 1992

AM Gibson, Yankees in paradise; the Pacific basin frontier, University of New Mexico Press 1993

D Hanlon, “Micronesia; writing and rewriting the histories of a nonentity”, PS, 12, 2, 1-22, 1989

D Hanlon, “Patterns of colonial rule in Micronesia”, in Howe KR, Kiste RC and Lal BV, eds, Tides of History, Allen and Unwin, 93-118, 1994

S Henningham, “Decolonisation, indigenous rights and internal conflicts” in his The Pacific Island States; security and sovereignty in the post-Cold War Pacific, Macmillan, 52-70, 1995

E Hoyt, Pacific destiny; the story of America in the western sea from the early 1800s to the 1980s, Norton 1981

J Johnson, “USA; the big umbrella” in R Crocombe and A Ali, eds, Foreign forces in Pacific politics, Institute of Pacific Studies/USP 1983 p.68-86

RC Kiste, “United States” in Howe KR, Kiste RC and Lal Bv, eds, Tides of History, Allen and Unwin, 227-56, 1994

M McGrew M and C Brook, eds, Asia-Pacific in the new world order, Routledge 1998

DA Moreland, “The quest that failed; Jack London’s last tales of the South Seas”, PS, 8, 1, 48-70, 1984  

P Preston, Pacific-Asia in the global system; an introduction, Blackwell 1998

DHR Spennemann, “The United States annexation of Wake Atoll, Central Pacific” JPH, 33, 2, 239-48, 1998

 

ii.         Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) and Republic of Marshall Islands (RMI)

 

J Cameron, “Economic development options for the FSM at independence”, PS, 14, 4, 35-70, 1991

J Connell, “The new Micronesia; pitfalls and problems of dependent development”, PS, 14, 2, 87-120, 1991

LJ Gorenflo and MJ Levin, “The evolution of regional demography in the Marshall Islands, PS, 17, 1, 93-59, 1994

D Hanlon, From a stone altar; a history of Pohnpei, UH Press, 1994

F Hezel, The first taint of civilization; a history of the Caroline and Marshall islands in pre-colonial days 1521-1885, UH Press 1983

F Hezel, Strangers in their own land; a century of colonial rule in the Caroline and Marshall Islands, UH Press, 1995

JR Haglelgam, “Problems of national unity and economic development in the FSM”, Isla; A Journal of Micronesian Studies, 1,1, 5-12, 1992

DT Hughes and SK Laughlin, “Key elements in the evolving political culture of the FSM”, PS, 6, 1, 71-84, 1982

Z de Ishtar, “Fire in the water – Marshall Islands”, in her Daughters of the Pacific, Spinifex, 17-40, 1994

J Linnikin and L Poyer, eds, Cultural identity and ethnicity in the Pacific, University of Hawaii Press, 1990 (see chps 4,5 and 6)

SL Malcomson, “Marshall Islands” in his Tuturani; a political journey in the Pacific Islands, Simon & Schuster, 77-104, 1990

L Mason, “A Marshallese nation emerges from the political fragmentation of American Micronesia”, PS, 13, 1, 1-46, 1989

N Mellor, “The Micronesian executive; the FSM and the Marshall Islands”, PS, 14, 1, 55-72, 1990

E Michal, “Protected states; the political status of the FSM and the RMI”, TCP, 5, 2, 303-32, 1993

RS Moses and G Ashby, “Tradition and democracy on Pohnpei island” in R Crocombe et.al., eds, Culture and democracy in the South Pacific, IPS/USP, 205-16, 1992

G Petersen, “The FSM’s 1990 Constitutional Convention; calm before the storm?” TCP, 6, 2, 337-70, 1994

G Petersen, “Ponape’s body politic; island and nation”, PS, 8, 1, 112-36, 1984

HM Schwalbenberg, “Marshallese political developments”, JPH, 20, 105-15, 1985

HM Schwalbenberg, “The plebiscite on the future political status of the FSM”, JPH,

 19, 172-84, 1984

HG Segal, Kosrae; the sleeping lady awakens, Kosrae State Govt, 1995

G Smith, Micronesia; decolonisation and US military interests in the Trust Territory

of the Pacific Islands, ANU Press, 1991

Spennemann D, “The United States annexation of Wake Atoll, Central pacific Ocean”, JPH, 33, 2, 239-48, 1998

 

 

iii        Palau

 

Z de Ishtar, “We have only one Beleu- Beleu”, in her Daughters of the Pacific, Spinifex, 41-66, 1994

G Iyechad and F Quimby, “Belau; super-port, fortress or identity” in R Teiwaki, et.al., eds Politics in Micronesia, Institute of Pacific Studies/USP, 100-30, 1983

PF Kluge, “Home and away; Palau” in his The edge of paradise; America in Micronesia, Random House 185-244, 1991

SL Malcomson, “Palau” in his Tuturani; a political journey in the Pacific Islands, Simon & Schuster, 27-46, 1990

RJ Parmentier, “The rhetoric of free association and Palau’s political struggle”, TCP, 3, 1, 146-58, 1991

RJ Parmentier, “Book Review Forum; RJ Parmentier, The sacred remains; myth, history and polity in Beleu”, PS, 14, 3, 147-80, 1991

E Rampell, “Beleu; nuclear free isles under siege” in D Robie, ed, Tu Galala; social change in the Pacific, Bridgit Williams Books/Pluto Press, 137-44, 1992

ED Rechebei and S McPhetres, eds, History of Palau; heritage of an emerging nation, Ministry of Education, Palau, 1997

D Robie, “Beleu – trust betrayed”, in his Blood on the banner; nationalist struggles in the South Pacific, Malaya Books, 161-76, 1989

DR Shuster, “Palau’s compact; controversy. Conflict and compromise”, Isla; A Journal of Micronesian Studies, 2,2, 207-36, 1994

DR Shuster, “Palau’s constitutional tangle”, JPH, 15, 74-82, 1980

DR Shuster, “Elections, compact and assassination in the Republic of Palau”, PS, 12, 1, 23-48, 1988

T Wesley-Smith, Asia in the Pacific; migrant labour and tourism in the Republic of Palau, a special issue of TCP, 12, 2, 2000

 

iv         Guam and CNMI

 

V Diaz, “Simply Chamorro; telling tales of demise and survival in Guam”, TCP, 6, 1, 29-58, 1994

D Farrell, The pictorial history of Guam (4 vols) Micronesian Productions 1984-91

Z de Ishtar, “A nation divided – Guam and the Norhtern Martians” and “Tourism is not good for children”, in her Daughters of the Pacific, Spinifex, 67-72 and 83-98, 1994

T Maga, “Democracy and defence; the case of Guam, USA 1918-41”, JPH, 156-72, 1985

SL Malcomson, “Guam” in his Tuturani; a political journey in the Pacific Islands, Simon & Schuster, 47-62, 1990

SL Malcomson, “Saipan” in his Tuturani; a political journey in the Pacific Islands, Simon & Schuster, 63-76, 1990

A McPhetres, “Northern Marianas Islands; US commonwealth” in R Teiwaki, et.al., eds Politics in Micronesia, Institute of Pacific Studies/USP, 146-160, 1983

SF McPhetres, “Challenges to democracy in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands” in R Crocombe et.al., eds, Culture and democracy in the South Pacific, IPS/USP, 217-38, 1992

LW Mayo, “US administration and prospects for economic self-sufficiency; a comparison of Guam and select areas of Micronesia”, PS, 11, 3, 53-76, 1988

RF Rogers, “Guam’s quest for political identity”, PS, 12, 1, 49-70, 1988

WH Stewart, “The influence of history on the CNMI’s relationship with the United States and the areas recent development”, Journal of the Pacific Society, 82, 3, 1-27, 1999

C Taitano, “Guam the struggle for civil and political rights” in R Teiwaki, et.al., eds Politics in Micronesia, Institute of Pacific Studies/USP, 131-145, 1983

WE Tagupa, “The northern Marianas; secession from trusteeship and accession to commonwealth”, JPH, 12, 81-5, 1975

R Underwood, “The State of Guam’s agenda in Washington” in Isla; A journal of Micronesian studies, 4, 1, 109-130, 1996

R Underwood, “Excursions into inauthenticity; the Chamorros of Guam” in M Chapman, ed, Mobility and identity in the Island Pacific, special issue of Pacific Viewpoint, 26, 1, 160-84, 1985

 

v.         Hawaii

 

J Alder, “Kamehameha’s attitude towards the United States”, JPH, 3 107-15, 1968

 E Buck, Paradise remade; the politics of culture and history in Hawaii, Temple University Press 1993

G Daws, Shoals of time; a history of the Hawaiian Islands, University of Hawaii Press 1968

LH Fuchs, Hawaii Pono; a social history, Harvest/HBJ, 1961

U Hasager and J Friedman, Hawaii; return to nationhood, IWGIA, Copenhagen, 1994

RDK Herman, “The dread taboo, human sacrifice and Pearl Harbour”, TCP, 8,1, 81-126, 1996

Z de Ishtar, “Aloha aina – love the land - Hawaii”, in her Daughters of the Pacific, Spinifex, 99-118, 1994

E Joesting, Hawaii; an uncommon history, Norton, 1972

K Howe, “Kamehamehas of Hawaii” in his Where the waves fall, Allen and Unwin 152-176, 1984

P Laenui, “The overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy” in D Denoon, ed, The Cambridge History of the Pacific Islanders, CUP, 232-37, 1997

P Laenui, “Repression and renaissance in Hawaii” in D Denoon, ed, The Cambridge History of the Pacific islanders, CUP, 403-7, 1997

BLM Lee, “The relationship between the United States and the Native Hawaiian people; a case of spouse abuse”, in Borofsky R, ed, Remembrances of Pacifivc pasts, UH Press, 358-60, 2000

D Mcgregor, “Ho’I Ho’I Ea Hawaii; restoring Hawaiian sovereignty” in vom Busch W, et.al., eds, New politics in the South Pacific, IPS/USP, 31-54, 1994

N Meller, “Hawaii; 50th state” in Afeaki E, et.al., Politics in Polynesia, IPS/USP, 229-38, 1983

LK Menton and EH Tamura, A history of Hawaii, CDRG/University of Hawaii, 1999

MA Meyer, “Our own liberation; reflections on Hawaiian epistemology”, TCP, 13, 1, 124-48, 2001

JK Osario, “What kine Hawaiian are you?; a Mo’olelo about nationhood, race, history and the contemporary sovereignty movement in Hawai’i”, TCP, 13, 2 ,359-80, 2001

C Ralston, “Hawaii 1778-1854; some aspects of maka’ainana response to rapid cultural change”, JPH, 19, 21-40, 1986

D Scarr, “Hawaii; undermining the tree” in his The History of the Pacific Islands, Macmillan, 124-33 1990

WEH Tagupa, “Hawaii and the United States Supreme Court; three cases on law, history and the United States Constitution”, PS, 11, 1, 131-48, 1987

WEH Tagupa, “Education change and assimilation in Nineteenth Century Hawaii”, PS, 5, 1, 1981

KH Trask, “Hawaii; colonization and decolonisation” in A Hooper, et.al., eds, Class and culture in the South Pacific, IPS/USP, 154-75,  1987

 

vi.        American Samoa

 

D Ahlburg, “Return migration from the United States to American Samoa …”, PS, 17, 2, 71-84, 1994

D Chappell, “The forgotten Mau; anti-Navy protest in American Samoa 1920-1935” Pacific Historical Review, 69, 2, 217-60, 2000

EFH Faleomavaega, Navigating the future; a Samoan perspective on US-Pacific relations, Institute of Pacific Studies/USP 1995

EFH Faleomavaega, “Some perspectives on American Samoa’s political relationship with the United States, PS, 13, 2, 119-24, 1990

EFH Faleomavaega, “American Samoa; a unique relationship in the South Pacific”, in vom Busch W, et.al., eds, New politics in the South Pacific, IPS/USP, 113-22, 1994

CJ Fox, “American Samoa; which road ahead?”  PS, 1,1, 47-53, 1977

PM Kennedy, The Samoan triangle; a study in Anglo-German-American relations 1878-1900, UQP, 1974

GR Lethwaite, et.al., “From Polynesia to California; Samoan migration and its sequel”, JPH, 8, 133-57, 1972

M Meleisea, Lagaga; a short history of Western Samoa, IPS/USP, 1987

M Meleisea, The making of modern Samoa, IPS/USP, 1987

EJ Michal, “American Samoa or Eastern Samoa?; the potential for American Samoa to become freely associated with the United States”, TCP, 4, 1, 137-60, 1992

EC Rhoads, “The impact of modernisation on the aged in American Samoa”, PS, 7, 2, 15-33, 1984

B Rigby, “Private interests and the origins of American involvement in Samoa 1872-77”, JPH, 8, 75-87, 1972

M Stover, “Individual land tenure in American Samoa”, TCP, 11, 1, 69-104, 1999

FIF Sunia, “American samoa; Fa’a Amerika?” in Afeaki E, et.al., Politics in Polynesia, IPS/USP, 115-30, 1983

W Tagupa, “The High Court of Western Samoa and the traditional land tenure disputes in the context of modern economic development” in R Crocombe and M Meleisea, eds, Land issues in the Pacific, IPS/USP, 183-190, 1994

 

vii.        Micronesia (from USTT to Free Association)

 

D Ballendorf, “Secrets without substance; US intelligence in the Japanese mandates 1915-1935”, JPH, 83-99, 1984

E Boneparth and MJ Wilkinson, “Terminating trusteeship for the FSM and RMI; independence and self-sufficiency in the post-Cold War Pacific, PS, 18, 1, 61-78, 1995

M Eilenburg, “American policy in Micronesia”, JPH, 17, 62-64, 1981

TJ Gaffaney, “Linking colonization and decolonisation; the case of Micronesia”, PS, 18, 1, 23-60, 1995

HM Friedman, “Races undesirable from a military point of view; United States security in the Pacific Islands 1945-47”, JPH, 32, 1, 49-70, 1997

HM Friedman, “Arguing over empire; American interservice and interdepartmental rivalry over Micronesia 1943-47”, JPH, 29,1, 36-48, 1994

HM Friedman, “The open door in paradise? United States strategic security and economic policy in the Pacific Islands 1945-47”, PS, 20, 1, 63-88, 1997

D Hanlon, Remaking Micronesia; discourses over development in a Pacific territory 1944-82, University of Hawaii Press 1997

D Hanlon, “The end of history for the edge of paradise; economic development and the Compacts of free association in American Micronesia”, in BV Lal and H nelson, eds, Lines across the sea; colonial inheritance in the post colonial Pacific, PHA, p.83-94, 1995

C Heine, Micronesia at the crossroads, University of Hawaii Press 1974

C Heine, “Micronesia’s Future Status Commission; its rendezvous with destiny”, JPH, 4, 127-32, 1969

FX Hezel, “Suicide and the Micronesian family”, TCP, 1,1, 43-74, 1989

R Kiste, “Termination of the US Trusteeship in Micronesia” JPH, 21, 127-38, 1986

PF Kluge, The edge of paradise; America in Micronesia, Random House 1991

N Meller, “On matters constitutional in Micronesia”, JPH, 15, 83-92, 1980

WR Moore, “Grass shirted Yap” National Geographic, 805-30, Dec 1952

HF Nufer, Micronesia under American rule; an evaluation of the strategic trusteeship 1947-1977, Exposition Press 1978

CB Paterson, “In the far Pacific; at the birth of nations”, National Geographic, 460-99, Oct 1986

G Petersen, “Why is Micronesian independence an issue?” in BV Lal and H nelson, eds, Lines across the sea; colonial inheritance in the post colonial Pacific, PHA, p.69-82, 1995

G Petersen, “A cultural analysis of the Ponapean independence vote in the 1983 plebiscite”, PS, 9, 1, 13-52, 1985

L Poyer, S Falgout, LM Carucci, “Inaugurating American rule”, Chp 8 in their The typhoon of war; Micronesian experiences of the Pacific war, University of Hawaii Press 2001

D Rubinstein, “Love and suffering; adolescent socialisation and suicide in Micronesia”, TCP, 7,1, 21-54, 1995

S Rattan, “The Yap controversy and its significance”, JPH, 124-36, 1972

D Scarr, “Global pawns; Micronesians and the United States 1944-86” in his The History of the Pacific Islands, Macmillan, 296-309, 1990

R Teiwaki, et.al., eds Politics in Micronesia, Institute of Pacific Studies/USP 1983

R Trumbull, “The rusted Trust” in his Tin roofs and palm trees; a report on the new South Seas, ANU Press, 251-80, 1977

 

viii.    Pacific War 1941-45

 

R Borofsky, ed, Remembrances of pacific pasts, UH Press, 2000 (see Chps 15 and 16)

S Firth, “The war in the Pacific” in D Denoon, ed, The Cambridge History of the Pacific Islanders, CUP, 291-23, 1997

W Gardiner, Te mura o te ahi; The story of the Maori batallion, Reed 1992

H Laracy, “World War 11” in Howe KR, Kiste RC and Lal BV, eds, Tides of history, Allen and Unwin, 149-69, 1994

Laracy H and White G, eds, Taem blong faet; World War 11 in Melanesia, a special issue of ‘O’O; a Journal of Solomon Islands Studies, 4, 1998

P McQuarrie, Strategic atolls; Tuvalu and the Second World War, IPS/USP 1994

L Poyer, S Falgout, LM Carucci, “The legacy of war”, Chp 9 in their The typhoon of war; Micronesian experiences of the Pacific war, University of Hawaii Press, p.315-56, 2001

G White, ed, Remembering the Pacific war, CPIS/UH, 1991

G White and L Lindstrom, eds, The Pacific theatre; Island representations of World War 11, UH Press, 1989

G White, et.al., eds, The big death; Solomon Islanders remember World War 11, IPS/USP, 1988

 

 

ix.        Bikini and nuclear testing

 

B Danielsson, Mururoa mon amour; the French nuclear tests in the Pacific, Penguin1974

J Diblin, Day of two suns; US nuclear testing and the Pacific Islanders, Virago 1988

S Firth and K von Strokirch, “A nuclear Pacific”, in D Denoon, ed, The Cambridge History of the Pacific Islanders, CUP, 324-58, 1997

S Firth, “Strategic and nuclear issues”, in Howe KR, Kiste RC and Lal BV, eds, Tides of History, Allen and Unwin, 300-24, 1994

S Firth, Nuclear playground, Allen and Unwin 1987

PD Jones, From Bikini to Belau; the nuclear colonisation of the Pacific, WRI 1988

RC Kiste, “Identity and relocation; the Bikini case”, in M Chapman, ed, Mobility and identity in the Island Pacific, special issue of Pacific Viewpoint, 26, 1, 1985

Y Ogashiwa, Microstates and nuclear issues; regional cooperation in the Pacific, IPS/Usp1991

D Robie, “Niuklia fri Pasifik”, in his Blood on the banner; nationalist struggles in the South Pacific, Malaya Books, 142-60, 1989

WS Ellis and JP Blair, “A way of life lost; Bikini”, National Geographic 169, 6, 813-34, 1986

 

x.         Whaling and trading

 

F Hezel, “A Yankee trader in Yap; Crayton Philo Holcomb”, JPH, 10, 3-19, 1970 (also in D Scarr, ed, More Pacific Island Portraits, ANU Press, 59-74, 1978

TB McGrath, “Whalers in Micronesia”, JPH, 21, 104-9, 1986

D O’Donnell, “The Pacific guano islands; the stirring of American empire in the Pacific Ocean”, PS, 16, 1, 43-66, 1993

GI Quimby, “Hawaiians in the fur trade of Northwest America, JPH, 92-108, 1972

 

xi.        Missions

 

D Hanlon, “God versus Gods; first years of the Micronesian Mission on Pohnpei 1852-59”, JPH, 19, 41-59, 1984

F Hezel, “Catholic missions in the Caroline and Marshall islands”, JPH, 5, 213-27, 1970

M Marshall, “Holy and unholy spirits; the effects of missionization on alcohol use in eastern Micronesia”, JPH, 11, 135-66, 1975

S Wagner-Wright, “When unity is torn asunder; the distressing case of Thomas and Lucia Holman”, PS, 15, 2, 39-60, 1992

 

xii.     Recent events and regional commentaries

 

The journals The Contemporary Pacific and Journal of Pacific History have annual surveys, and Pacific News Bulletin, The New Pacific, Pacific Islands Business, and  Tok blong SPFF comment on monthly or quarterly current events.

 

There are hundreds of www sites on the Pacific region, individual countries or special single-focus issues, as well as daily news bulletins and updates.

 

11      Risk Assessment Statement

 

There are no out of the ordinary risks associated with this unit

 

12      Disclaimer

 

Offer of some units is subject to viability, and information in these Unit Outlines is subject to change prior to commencement of semester

 

13      Study schedule

 

SUMMARY  All sessions 9.00am-3.00pm unless noted

 

Tue 16 Jul     (I hour introduction) Overview, Introductory activities, Assessment

guidelines (12.00-1.00 in Room L301)

Sat 20 Jul     USA in Pacific 1800-2000; Discuss Crocombe questions.

Sat 27 Jul     Hawaii - Kamehameha to Annexation; Discuss Kiste questions   

Sat 03 Aug    Hawaii since 1900; Special topic 1; Discuss Hanlon questions;

 Student presentations (part a)

Sat 10 Aug    Special topics 2-4; Student presentations (part b)

Sat 17 Aug    Special topics 5-7; Student presentations (part c)

Sat 24 Aug    Examination

 

                       Readings ; questions for assessment and discussion

 

(1) R Crocombe, “Overview; parameters of US-Pacific interaction” and “Territory,

expansion then contraction of the US empire”, Chps 1 and 2, in his The Pacific

islands and the USA, IPS/USP, p.1-47, 1995

(2) R Kiste, “United States”,  in K Howe, R Kiste and BV Lal, eds, Tides of History;

the Pacific Islands in the 20th C, Allen and Unwin, 227-57, 1994

(3) D Hanlon, “Micronesia; writing and rewriting the histories of a nonentity”, PS, 12,

2, 1-22, 1989

 

FULL PROGRAM AND STUDENT TASKS

__________________________________________________________

 

Tue    16 Jul          Introductory activities; L301, 12.00-1.00 (Week 1)

 

12.00 - 1.00    Discussion on USA-Pacific connections, weekly tasks, essay and presentation guidelines, course content

 

Independent tasks between before Saturday 20th July

 

1.       Complete questions on Crocombe Chps 1-2 (1) and bring to class on 20 July for discussion and submission

2        Select country/territory/entity for essay

3        Select three to five other readings on the topic and general background on this period, -  copy, read and make notes

4        Check the video questions (Pacific Century) ready for class discussion.

 

First Saturday session       20 July         0900-1500hrs

 

9.00 - 10.30    Survey of USA-Pacific to 1850

11.00 - 12.30  Pacific Century - video and discussion of questions on video

1.00 - 2.00     Themes, periodisation, historiography

2.00 - 3.00     Class Discussion on Crocombe (1) questions

 

Independent tasks before 27th July

 

1.       Read on indigenous response to colonialism – start with H-K Trask (1987) “Hawaii; colonisation …” (in Readings)

2.       Read on  (in Readings)

3.       Answer Kiste questions and bring to class on 27 July

4.       Prepare first draft of essay

 

 Second Saturday session   27 July         0900-1500hrs

 

9.00 – 10.30   Survey of USA-Pacific relations 1850-1900

11.00 - 12.30  Video and discussion

1.00 – 2.00     Class Discussion on Kiste questions

2.00 - 3.00     Survey of USA-Pacific relations 1900 to present

 

Independent tasks before 3rd August

 

i.        Continue reading on essay topic

ii        Complete final draft of essay

iii       Prepare draft of your report to class

iv.            Start reading, say two articles/chapters on each special topic - Start with Special topic (1); O’Donnell, “The Pacific guano islands ……” (in Readings)

v.              Answer questions on Hanlon (3) and bring to class 3rd August

        

Third Saturday session      3rd August     0900-1500hrs

 

9.00 - 10.30    Special topics 1; Guano, fur and whales – a commercial interest

11.00 - 12.00  Class discussion on answers to Hanlon (3);

12.00 - 1.00    Student presentations

1.30 - 3.00     Student presentations

 

Independent tasks before 10th August

 

i.        Complete final Draft of essay

ii        Prepare draft of your report to class

iii       Read at least one additional reference each  for Special topics , 2, 3 and 4 – start with G Daws, chp 3 on Herman Melville in

A dream of islands … (in Readings) and S Firth, “The war in the Pacific” (in Readings)

 

Fourth Saturday session    10th August   0900-1500hrs

 

9.00 – 10.00   Special topics No 2; Biography – Walter Murray Gibson

10.00 – 11.00  Student presentations

11.30 – 12.30  Special topics No 3; Biography – Herman Melville

12.30 -1.30    Student presentations

2.00 - 3.00     Special topic No 4; WW11 – the USA campaigns

 

Independent tasks before 17th August

 

i        Prepare draft of your report to class

ii        Read additional references  for Special topics 5, 6 and 7-  Start with Poyer, Falgout and Carucci on “The legacy of war” (in Readings) and Boneparth and Wilkenson (1995) and Darwin (1996) on the Cold war period (in Readings)

 

 

Fifth Saturday session       17th August   0900-1500hrs

 

9.00 – 10.00   Special topics No 5; WW11 – indigenous responses

10.00 – 11.00  Student presentations

11.30 – 12.30  Special topics No 6; Bikini and nuclear testing

12.30 -1.30    Student presentations

2.00 - 3.00     Special topic No 7; The impact of the Cold War

 

Independent tasks before Examination )

 

i        Select four special topics for study and read  at least one additional reference each on special topic

ii        Read  at least one additional reference on Hawaii

ii        Revise and make summaries of notes

 

Sixth (and last) Saturday session 24 August     0900-1210hrs

 

09.00 - 09.10  Reading Time

09.10 - 12.10  Examination

 

14            Readings and questions (for the first three sessions)

 

Questions on

Crocombe R, The Pacific Islands and the USA, IPS/USP, 1995, 1-48

 

1               Crocombe claims USA actions took place in a global context of competition – competition between whom?

In 19th C        -

In 1890s        -

In 1900-1945  -

In 1950-1990  -

2               Crocombe identifies 5 periods in the relationship between USA and Oceania. List the dates for each period.

3               Crocombe claims USA policy in Oceania is not representative of wider USA attitudes; List six areas of difference.

4               Crocombe lists three forms of territorial control (annexation) – list the three forms.

5               Crocombe claims the USA was definitely “colonial” and the “most active in the world in the 1800s in acquiring territory” – what evidence is used to support this claim?

6               On pages 19-21, Crocombe lists several motivations behind the USA presence – what attracted the USA to Oceania?

7               Why is Ogasawara a “unique case?”

8               What are the key dates in the USA control of;

 

Hawaii

         1854

         1887

         1893  

1898

Guam

         1898

         1950

American Samoa

         1878

         1899

         1904

         1951

Micronesia

         1914

         1947

         1951

         1961

         1962

         1965

 

9        What does the acronym LOS stand for?

10      Crocombe states the shrinkage phase has begun” – what were the first five territories passed over?

 

Questions on

Kiste RC, “United States” in Howe KR, Kiste RC and Lal BV, eds, Tides of history, Allen and Unwin, 1994, 227-57

 

1               Kiste lists three “strategic and security concerns” to explain USA acquisitions – what are they?

2               What six  “perceptions and sentiments” affected USA behaviour?

3               List the 7 components of the USTT.

4               “Strategic denial” is mentioned by Kiste several times – what did it mean?

5               Kiste calls US policy in the USST as a “caretaker status” – what does he mean?

6               What three events caused policy to change in the 1960s?

7               Why does Kiste claim “Events ran amok?”

8               Why did Micronesia divide into “have nots” and “haves” ?

9               List the dates when the new entities in Micronesia came into existence.

10            Why is commonwealth status a “disappointment?”

11            List ten key dates and events for Guam 1898-1989.

12            List five major “changes” that occurred in American Samoa 1900-1990.

13            Kiste claims Hawaiians may take pride in achievements – list three.

14            Kiste claims Hawaiians still struggle – list three areas of dispute.

15        Kiste concludes on the USA presence in Oceania by describing new

               regional linkages – what are these new linkages?

 

Questions on

David Hanlon, “Micronesia; writing and rewriting the histories of a nonentity”, Pacific Studies, 12, 2, 1989, 1-21

 

1        Why does Hanlon claim the first step is the “deconstruction or disassembling

 of the essentially alien construct that is Micronesia”?

2        What three examples does Hanlon give to support his claim that “outside

 forces have consistently sought to exploit the islands”?

3        What four examples does Hanlon offer to support his claim that Micronesia is

 “an extremely important are in world affairs”?

4        In your own opinion how would rank Micronesia’s importance – very low,

 low, middle, high or very high order importance in world affairs?

5        Why does Hanlon describe the washing of Kourabi’s bones? 

6        Why does Hanlon describe his conversation with a Pohnpeian?

7        Why does Hanlon describe the navigation skills of the Puluwat navigators?

8        What two pieces of evidence does Hanlon offer to show Micronesia has a past

 that “extends far back in time”?

9        What is Marshall Sahlin’s contribution to the study of the Pacific islands?

10      What do the examples of Pohnpei’s voting on the Draft compact and

 Sapwuafik’s massacre stories prove about Micronesian history?

11      Why does Hanlon ask – who should write these histories?

12      Hanlon offers four pieces pf evidence to support the claim that Micronesians

have demonstrated “active agency”?

 

 

READINGS

For
HHB248 The USA and the Asia-Pacific region

Semester 2 2002

 

Contents

__________________________________________________________________

 

1       R Crocombe, “Overview; parameters of US-Pacific islands interaction” (Chp 1) and “Territory; expansion then contraction of the US Pacific empire” (Chp 2) in The Pacific Islands and the USA, Institute of Pacific Studies Press, Suva, 1-48, 1995

 

2       RC Kiste, “United States” in Howe KR, Kiste RC and Lal Bv, eds, Tides of History, Allen and Unwin, 227-56, 1994

 

3       D Hanlon, “Micronesia; writing and rewriting the histories of a nonentity”, PS, 12, 2, 1-22, 1989

 

4       KH Trask, “Hawaii; colonization and decolonisation” in A Hooper, et.al., eds, Class and culture in the South Pacific, IPS/USP, 154-75,  1987

 

5       D O’Donnell, “The Pacific guano islands; the stirring of American empire in the Pacific Ocean”, PS, 16, 1, 43-66, 1993

 

6       G Daws, “Herman Melville” in his A dream of islands; voyages of self-discovery in the South Seas, Jacaranda, 1980

 

7       S Firth, “The war in the Pacific” in D Denoon, ed, The Cambridge History of the Pacific Islanders, CUP, 291-23, 1997

 

8       L Poyer, S Falgout, LM Carucci, “The legacy of war”, Chp 9 in their The typhoon of war; Micronesian experiences of the Pacific war, University of Hawaii Press, p.315-56, 2001

 

9       E Boneparth and MJ Wilkinson, “Terminating trusteeship for the FSM and RMI; independence and self-sufficiency in the post-Cold War Pacific, PS, 18, 1, 61-78, 1995

 

10   Darwin J, “Decolonisation and world politics” in Lowe D, ed, Australia and the end of empires, Deakin University Press, 7-24, 1996

 

11   Meller N, “Indigenous self-determination and its implementation”, Pacific Studies, 23, 1-2,

1-19, 2000

 

12    Crocombe, “A chronology of American involvement in the Pacific islands” , in The Pacific

Islands and the USA, Institute of Pacific Studies Press, Suva, 1-48, 1995

 

 

 

School of Humanities and Human Services

Queensland University of Technology

July 2002

 

 

HHB248 The USA and the Asia-Pacific region

 

STUDENT _______________________________________________    DATE     ______________

 

TOPIC       _______________________________________________     GRADE  ______________

 

The class presentation

 

N M S G H O                   Identify period, location and historical contexts and themes

N M S G H O                   List assertions (on OHP)

N M S G H O          Main conclusions

 

 

The essay

 

N M S G H O          Identify the country and unique aspects of the relationship

N M S G H O                   Describe annexation, the nature of control, decolonisation

N M S G H O                   Comment on current and future directions

N M S G H O                   Describe the wider chronology of USA-Pacific relationships

N M S G H O                   Acknowledge supporting or contrary historical interpretations

N      S                   Appropriate footnoting, references and bibliography

 

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