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Mäori History, Culture and Society

PACS 492

University of Hawai‘i Summer School 2001

 

Duration 35 hours
Credit

3 credits

Pouako

 Hurihia Tuteao (email: huriteao@xtra.co.nz)  MA (Hons), B.Ed., Dip.Tchg.

Time 

1:30 –3:30pm [Mon-Fri, June 4 – 29, 2001]

Place   Moore 109

         

 

SUMMARY

Mäori society will be examined through its diverse relationships, up to, and including World War II, and urbanization. Four themes will be covered:

 

·        Fundamental principles [mauri, tapu, ihi ….]

·        Social organization [land, hapü, iwi, leadership, social control…]

·        He iwi tahi tätou [‘opening up’ of the country, intentions, responses…]

·        Urbanization [post-war relationships …‘negotiating a new space’]

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this course the student will:

 

·      demonstrate greater confidence and awareness of tikanga Mäori (Mäori values),

·      identify the value[s] underpinning social order prior to colonization,

·      demonstrate a growing awareness of the Treaty of Waitangi,

·      identify the issues arising from urbanization.

 

ORGANIZATION AND TEACHING METHODS

Lessons will comprise lectures, films, peer presentations and possibly two guest speakers. One text will be issued, and a compendium of selected readings will also be provided. In keeping with the kaupapa of the course, classes will observe Mäori protocol, thus begin and end with karakia.

 

It is expected that students will;

·      attend diligently,

·      participate in a positive manner (all criticism will be constructive),

·      engage in critical analysis of the material, and

·      demonstrate mutual respect.

 

CONSULTATION

I will be available in Moore 220 12:30 - 1:20 Mon & Fri; 3:40 – 4:30 Tues & Thurs. Call 956-2659 for an appointment

 

ASSESSMENT

 

1

Quiz (3 X 15)

 

45

2

Presentation

Oral presentations will take place during the final week. [To be finalised in the first session]

 

40

3

Waiaro-attitude, attendance & participation

15

 

TEXT:

Barlow, Cleve (1991) Tikanga Whakaaro. Key concepts in Maori culture Oxford University Press Auckland

Reading compendium A survey of Maori history, culture and society. PACS 492 Summer Session 1 2001

 

SCHEDULE

 

Module

 

Objective

Content focus

Wk 1

June 4-8

He kakano I ruia

 mai I Rangiatea

Edore e ngaro

Identify the core components of identity

Assignment: 15 points

Explain the personal significance of three concepts (6 pts), Significance of names, & experience/practice of the

naming process (9 pts).

whakapapa, mate, ora, noa, aitua

Tuakiri [mauri, iho-matua, mana, tapu, wehi, ihi, hinengaro, ngakau, whatumanawa, waihanga, pumanawa] 

tika, pono, hongi, tohi, pure, manaaki,

 

Wk 2

11-15

He taura tangata

Identify the fundamental principles of community Assignment: 15 pts – includes peer evaluation Static display –“that most precious”, observation and feedback through discussion and peer evaluation sheet.

whanau, hapu, iwi, waka

tupuna, mokopuna, ariki, kaumatua, tohunga

whare wananga, kawa, tikanga, ahi ka

ohu, muru, rahui, kaitiaki

marae, turangawawae, whenua

 

Wk 3

18-22

He iwi tahi

Examine one’s understanding about relationships between diverse cultures and the current issues that arise from ‘myths of contact.’

Assignment: 15 points

Analysse an article about negotiation between people [individual or group] of different backgrounds.

Discoverers, traders & evangelists & colonialism

Declaration of Independence & Treaty of Waitangi

Reconstruction [prophets & kings]

War & the urban battleground

 

Wk 4

25-29

Te ao hurihuri

Demonstrate in detail an understanding of one aspect of Maori  society, and the extent to which it has universal relevance.

Assignment: 40 points

30-40 min. presentation on one aspect of Maori  society, and any universal relevance.

Oral presentation – topic of choice

 

 

 
A SURVEY OF CONTEMPORARY MÄORI ISSUES JULY 2-27 2001

 

SUMMARY

Increasingly, indigenous peoples across the world are trying to come to terms with issues that face them as individuals, and ‘endangered’ communities. While exploring contemporary Mäori issues, the student will make reference to his/her situation. The course will challenge the student to identify significant issues within their own contexts, and develop a framework within which he/she can contribute towards resolution.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Increased awareness of contemporary Mäori issues

Recognition of (similar) issues within own situation

Identify (an) issue(s) within own context, and ways in which to contribute.

 

ORGANIZATION & TEACHING METHODS

Students will organize themselves into ‘communities’ of shared interest (ethnicity, sport club, etc.,  …)

Examination of current Mäori issues will be achieved through lecture-discussion during the first hour of each session, after which the groups will work on a framework for long-term sustainability of their ‘interest’ group. 

 

CONTENT

Education

Language revitalization & quality

Leadership & Citizenship

‘Managing’ inevitable change (protocols, mores. etc…)

Reinvention - Selection and Deletion (what stands the test of time, what becomes

obsolete …)

Symbols

 

ASSESSMENT: Framework for a community sustainability.

 

Progress Report             Who, What, Why, How (significance etc)

Oral presentation:            Main points, issues            

Written Report:            Evaluation of process, Main points/Framework

 

TEXT: A reading compendium will be distributed

 

 

 

Upload: 5/23/2003


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