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Hawaiian Gods: Pele and Kamapua'a

Religion 390
Spring 1995

Instructor: Dr John Charlot
Department of Religion
University of Hawai’i at Manoa
2530 Dole St., Sakamaki A-307
Honolulu, HI 96822
Tel: (808) 956-6848
Email: charlot@hawaii.edu

The following schedule is tentative and depends on the final number of students in the course. This is a writing intensive course. Students will write five three-page essays on the topics listed below (the first will not be graded). They will also write a semester research paper of ten pages on an approved topic from the Pele literature. A thirty-minute presentation of this paper will be made to the class. Some writing will be done in class.

January 30: topic approval for semester paper.

February 13: outline and bibliography for semester paper.

April 2: semester paper due.

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

January 16: Introduction to the Course
Diana Hacker: A Writer's Reference.
Charlot: The Kamapua'a Literature.

January 23: Introduction to the Kamapua'a Literature
Kamapua'a Packet.
Students will write a three-page paper on their view of Hawaiian religion. This paper will be corrected, but not graded.

January 30: Kamapua'a Stories
Kamapua'a Packet.
Students will write a three-page essay on a short Kamapua'a story, such as those by Po'oloa, Ashdown, and Mitchell in the Kamapua’a packet. This will be the first essay to be graded. Get topic approval for next week's essay.

February 6: Kamapua'a Local Complexes
Kamapua'a Packet.
Kaao no Kamapuaa, Tradition of Kamapuaa, in Samuel H. Elbert (ed.), 1959.
Selections from Fornander's Hawaiian Antiquities and Folk-Lore. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, pp. 196 - Students will obtain their own copy of this book, if they do not already own one.
Students will write a three-page essay on some aspect of the Fornander complex. Get topic approval one week earlier.

February 13: Kamapua'a Pan-Hawaiian Complexes and Chants
Kahiolo, G. W., 1978. He Moolelo No Kamapua'a, The Story of Kamapua'a (Esther T. Mookini, Erin C. Neizmen and David Tom, translators). Honolulu, Hawaiian Studies Program, University of Hawai'i.
Students will write a three-page essay on a Kamapua’a chant or on some aspect of the Kahiolo complex. Get topic approval one week earlier.

February 20: Introduction to the Pele Literature
Nimmo, H. Arlo, 1990. "The Cult of Pele in Traditional Hawai'i." Bishop Museum Occasional Papers, Volume 30, June, pp. 41 - 87.
Nimmo, H. Arlo, 1987. "Pele's Journey to Hawai'i: An Analysis of the Myths." Pacific Studies, Volume 11, Number 1, pp. 1 - 42.

February 27: Pele Stories
Pele Packet. (See list of contents at end of syllabus)
Students will write a three-page paper on a short Pele story or complex from the Pele Packet.

March 5: Versions of the Pele and Hi'iaka Complex I
Emerson, Nathaniel B., 1915. Pele and Hiiaka: A Myth from Hawaii. Honolulu: Honolulu Star-Bulletin.
[Moke Manu] Tone-Iahuanu-Tahuria-Iarafai E: A Hawaiian Legend of a Terrible War between Pele-of-the-Eternal Fires and Waka-of-the-Shadowy-Waters. Ka Loea Kalaiaina, May 13, - December 30, 1899, Translation by Mary Kawena Pukui. Bishop Museum Archives, Hawaiian Ethnological Notes Vol. II, pp. 942 - 1008.

March 12: Versions of the Pele and Hi'iaka Complex II

March 19: Pele Chants and Hula; Pele Today
Luomala, Katharine, 1972. "Disintegration and Regeneration, the Hawaiian Phantom Hitchhiker Legend."
Nimmo, H. Arlo, 1986. "Pele, Ancient Goddess of Contemporary Hawaii." Pacific Studies, Volume 9, Number 2, pp. 121 - 179.

March 26: Spring Break

April 2—23: Student Presentations
Students will make thirty-minute presentations of the semester essays.

April 30: Final Discussion

Grading:
50% for the semester paper
10% for each short, graded paper
10% for class participation

60% of each essay grade will be based on the content. 40% will be based on writing and presentation. Criteria include organization, grammar, spelling, and style.

honors grading for writing
B = no big mistakes (e.g., run-on or incomplete sentences, tense disagreement, singular/plural disagreement)
A = a few small mistakes

honors grading for content
B = good points with supporting arguments
A = good points with supporting arguments; originality and insight

One unexcused absence will result in the loss of half a grade.

According to departmental policy, incompletes will be given only for extraordinary reasons, such as health problems.

REQUIRED READING

BOOKS
Charlot, John, 1987. The Kamapua'a Literature: The Classical Traditions of the Hawaiian Pig God as a Body of Literature.

Diana Hacker: A Writer's Reference.

PACKETS
Packets are at the Copy Connection, Puck's Alley
I thank the publishers, Esther Mookini, and the Bishop Museum Archives for permission to photocopy their materials.

1. Kamapua'a Packet, 23 pp., required.
2. G. W. Kahiolo: He Moolelo no Kamapuaa, 100 pp., required.
3. Pele Packet, 131 pp., required.
Green, Laura S, 1926. Folk-tales from Hawaii. Second Series, Vassar College Fieldwork in Folk-Lore (ed. Martha Warren Beckwith). Poughkeepsie: Vassar College: "The Story of Paula" and "The Rock of Hanalei and the Rock of Lekia."

Green, Laura S and Mary Kawena Pukui, 1936. The Legend of Kawelo and other Hawaiian Folk Tales. Honolulu: Territory of Hawaii: "The Breadfruit Offering."

Green, Laura S, 1923. Hawaiian Stories and Wise Sayings. Vassar College Fieldwork in Folk-Lore (ed. Martha Warren Beckwith). Poughkeepsie: Vassar College: "The Story of the Sliding of Kahawali" and "The Story of Pele and Hiiaka."

The Coming of Pele, chant.

Ellis, William, 1963. Journal of William Ellis, Narrative of a Tour of Hawaii, or Whyhee; with Remarks on the History, Traditions, Manners, Customs and Language of the Inhabitants of the Sandwich Islands. Honolulu: Advertiser Publishing Company. Extract.

Kaili: Hiiaka, Daily Pacific Commercial Advertiser.

Clinton Kanahele and Hilda Hoohila Kawelo: "Project: An Attempt to Preserve the Hawaiian Language."

Nimmo, H. Arlo, 1990. "The Cult of Pele in Traditional Hawai’i." Bishop Museum Occasional Papers, Volume 30, June, pp. 41 - 87.

Nimmo, H. Arlo, 1987. "Pele’s Journey to Hawai’i: An Analysis of the Myths." Pacific Studies, Volume 11, Number 1, pp. 1 - 42.

Nimmo, H Arlo, 1986. "Pele, Ancient Goddess of Contemporary Hawaii." Pacific Studies, Volume 9, Number 2, pp. 121 - 179.

Luomala, Katharine, 1972. "Disintegration and Regeneration, the Hawaiian Phantom Hitchhiker Legend."

4. N. B. Emerson: Pele and Hiiaka, 137 pp., required.
5. Moke Manu: A Hawaiian Legend, 68 pp., required.

RESEARCH MATERIALS, NOT REQUIRED

KAMAPUA'A

General: Purdy, Ann, 1979. "Kamapuaa: English Translations."
HAWN GR110.H38 K35 1979.

Stories: Alameida, Roy, 1980. "O Kamapuaa: Na Wahi Pana o Ewa."
HAWN GR110.H38 A42 1980a.

Local Cycles, Kaliuwa'a:
Lane, Melia, 1979. "Cross-Reference of Descriptions of Kaliuwaa Valley."
HAWN GR110.H38 C76 1979a.

Jarrett, Edwin W., 1980. "Searching for the Mythological Home of the Hawaiian Demi-God Kamapuaa."
HAWN GR385.H3 J37

Thrum, Thos. G., 1920. Tributes of Hawaiian Traditions, The Pali and Battle of Nuuanu, Kaliuwaa Falls and Kamapuaa the Demigod.
HAWN GR385 .T55.

Pan-Hawaiian Complexes

Anonymous, 1891. He Molelo Kaao no Kamapuaa/ He Moolelo No Kamapuaa. Ka Leo O Ka Lahui, June 22, to September 28. Photocopy of Hawaiian text, HAWN GRll0.H38 M655 1983a. The following are studies and rough translations of this series .

Dorton, Lilikala, et al., 1979. "An Outline of Ka Moolelo Kaao o Kamapuaa, 'The Legendary Tradition of Kamapuaa': as Published in the Hawaiian Newspaper, Ka Leo o ka Lahui...."
HAWN GRll0.H38 097 1979.

Dorton, Lilikala, 1982. A Legendary Tradition of Kamapuaa, the Hawaiian Pig-God. HAWN CB5 .H3 no. 1571.

Akana-Gooch, Collette L., 1980. "Rough Translation of He Moolelo no Kamapuaa from Ka Leo o ka Lahui."
HAWN GRll0.H38 R68 1980a.

Raymond, Stanley H., II, 1980. "Rough Translation of the Kauai Cycle of He Moolelo (Kaao)no Kamapuaa in "Ka Leo o ka Lahui," August 26, 1891 to September 28, 1891. HAWN GRll0.H38 R683 1980a.

PELE

[Ka'awa, P. W.], February 2, 1865. Ka Moolelo no Pele; Kana Hana, Kona Mana, a me Kona Noho Ana." Ka Hoomana Kahiko, Helu 5. Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, p. 1, col. 6; p. 2, col. 1.

Ka'awa, P. W., February 9, 1865. "Ka Hoomana Kahiko. Helu 6. Ka Moolelo no Pele; Kana Hana, Kona Mana, a me Kona Noho Ana." Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, p. 1, cols. 5 f.

Kanahele, Pualani Kanaka'ole, and Duke Kalani Wise, 1989.

Ka Honua Ola (the living earth): an introduction to Pele and Hiiaka.
HAWN GRll0.H38 K36 1989

"The Last Priestess of Pele, " 1851 (see library computer) .

Kelly, Marion, 1984. Pele and Hiiaka Visit the Sites at Kee, Haena, Island of Kauai. Bishop Museum Press.
HAWN GRllO.H38 K45 1984

Lachman, Roy, 1960? "Behavior and Beliefs During the Recent Volcanic Eruption at Kapoho, Hawaii."
HAWN BF789.D5 L32

 

[Subject: Religion; Pacific/Comparative]



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