Educational Access
Mid-Year Report for 2000

July 15, 2000

Introduction

This report is compiled by the Hawaii Educational Networking Consortium's Education Program Manager as an overview of the Educational Access (EA) activities for the first six months of the calendar year 2000.

This report is broken down into four major sections which are identified below. The major sections of this report include:

 Section 1.0

The Channels and their Programming

 Page 1

 Section 2.0

 The 2000 Awards

 Page 2

 Section 3.0

 Funding and Report Summary

 Page 6

 Section 4.0

 Appendices

 Page 7

Section 1.0 - The Channels and their Programming

 

Section 1.1 - The Programming

The following table summarizes the programming activities for both the Educational Access programming channels on Oahu. Appendix 1 and 2 of this report contain a copy of each entities' benchmark report as filed by the UH and the DOE. Programming hours for the mid-year report include:

 

For Mid-Year
2000

 

Total Hours of Programming

 

Hours of Locally Produced Programming

 

Hours of Repeat Programming

 

Channel 55 --
University of Hawaii

 

1618.25

 

960.25

 

462

 

Channel 56 --
DOE/Teleschool

 

1873

 

663

 

761

 

Total

 

3491.25

 

1623.25

 

1223

Section 1.2 - Other Channel Related Issues

This reports finds that each of the channels have been submitting complete scheduling information for their programming hours to Olelo on a timely basis. This information is for use in their printed matter, publicized materials and website.

In accordance with the terms of the Education Access Agreement, HENC is to identify and confirm any recommendations relating to the programming needs of the educational institutions&emdash;based upon access to needed channel capacity. At the time of this report HENC has not identified any scheduling conflicts that required resolution.

 

Section 2.0 - The Awards

During 2000 the Hawaii Educational Networking Consortium (HENC) recommended three awards for the purpose of developing and delivering educational programming and services on the TEC and TEACh channels. The amount of the awards are detailed in Section 3.0 of this report and the 6 month results of the projects are described below:

 

Section 2.1 - Award No. 1
Department of Education (DOE) /Teleschool

Section 2.1.1 - Award No. 1 - Six Months in Review

During the first six months of 2000 the DOE has made satisfactory progress toward their plan as defined on page 3, Section 4.1.0 of the Educational Access Plan for 2000. The DOE has completed 100% of their promised Spring 2000 schedule for both In School and In Service programming. Work is also well underway to meet the schedule for the Summer 2000 portions of the projected plan.

Section 2.1.2 - Award No. 1 - Benchmark Update

During the past six months tangible progress has been made on the benchmark of a course evaluation system. Attached in Appendix 3 is a copy of the Teleschool's Program Evaluation form which was randomly mailed to educators on May 23, 2000. This project is being facilitated by an independent expert to assist the DOE with its cable course evaluations. Since the evaluation instrument was distributed to collect information relating to perceptions at the end of the school year this mid-year report does not contain a summary of the data. Such a summary will be contained in the Annual report for 2000.

As part of its continuing effort to provide equal and equitable access to all of its constituents during the past six months the DOE has aided in the facilitation of webcasting all of the Department of Education's Board of Education meetings. Webcasting is perceived as a logical extension of cable access programming. The DOE is hopeful that this will boost the accessibility of information relating to school oversight and management--most notably in remote communities who have little access to attend these meetings.

Section 2.1.3 - Award No. 1 - Supplemental Programming Summary

During the past six months a leaflet containing information relating to the Supplemental Programming Grants was distributed to the administrations of all Department and Section Heads of the Department of Education. As a result of this distribution of a request for proposal--two projects were funded during the reporting period. These include:

1) Performing Arts and You a series of 10 programs to be aired once a month with repeat airings, developed in conjunction with the School Renewal Group: Character Education, and Innovative Network Services; and 2) Teacher Quality Issues in Hawaii, a series of 10 programs with repeat airings, developed in conjunction with the Office of Personnel Services: Teacher Certification.

The DOE Supplemental Programming account has approximately $28,000 remaining for programming projects implemented during the year 2000.

Section 2.1.4 - Mid-Year Financial Review

During 2000 the Education Program Manager reviewed the expenditures and fiscal records of the DOE Teleschool relating to its core programming. This review did not identify any significant financial management issues relating to the DOE trust fund account.

 

Section 2.2.1 - Award No. 2

Hawaii Association of Independent Schools (HAIS)

Section 2.2.2 - Award No. 2 - Six Months in Review

During the first six months of 2000, the Hawaii Association of Independent Schools has continued the efforts initiated in the second half of 1999. These efforts focused on designing the overall infrastructure that will enable HAIS to plan, develop and produce cable programs for the Association itself--covering topics of importance with the private school community--and also with schools covering topics more specifically focused on a particular campus.

Appendix 4 of this report includes a draft document which was created to reflect the overall goal and mission of this ongoing work. The document begins broadly and ends with specific short-term strategic goals with a focus upon providing high-quality educational programs for cable access broadcast.

To assist in identifying and meeting their goals HAIS has assembled a HAIS Distance Learning Group which consists of representatives from Kamehameha Schools, La Pietra - Hawaii School for Girls, Punahou, Le Jardin Windward Oahu Academy, Maryknoll School. Mid-Pacific Institute, Hawaii Preparatory Academy as well other HAIS staff and research personnel.

Along with HAIS' overall vision and technology mission statement they have also embarked upon a plan to assemble the pieces of equipment (hardware and software) needed for their editing support infrastructure. The most basic of these components have now been assembled and the Association has the beginnings of their own

HAIS editing bay at their offices. When complete HAIS hopes to become more self-sufficient in their program editing requirements.

HAIS has now completed the final edits of New Schools For a New Millennium and Living on the Future Edge --and are completing four remaining programs. These programs will be aired during Summer 2000. The four programs still in the edit stage include: The Zen of Technology, by Peter Kay; Algebra Through the Grades, by Barbara Dougherty; Attention Deficit Disorder: What to Look for and What to Do, by Evelyn Yanagida and Roger Hamada; and, Using Your Best Experts for Professional Development in Technology: Ask Your Students!, by Tom Donohoe and Mid-Pacific Institute students.

Section 2.2.3 - Award No. 2 - Benchmark Update

For HAIS the post-production work has proven to be a learning experience but a process which will, in the future, allow HAIS to do more of the post-production work without outside help. HAIS has been hindered by the loss of critical technology staffing and the problems associated with finding and training a suitable replacement.

HAIS has also experienced unforeseen complications in developing the model of the "students-as-teachers" programming entitled Invitation To Teach (ITT). This proposed programming would help to foster and develop high school students interested in pursuing teaching as a profession. To date, HAIS has not been able to identify an appropriate high school for a partner. Work continues on finding a suitable partner for this programming.

While it is frustrating for all involved that HAIS has yet to air any of their proposed programming the Education Program Manager and the Consortium understands the difficulties of developing and implementing something as complex as educational programming under the confines of distance learning in such a short timeframe.

Section 2.2.4 - Award No. 2 - Supplemental Programming Summary

To date the Hawaii Association of Independent Schools has not expended any of their Supplemental Programming funds. The account balance for Supplemental programming is $11,562.38.

Section 2.2.5 - Award No. 2 - Mid-Year Financial Review

An income and expense statement was provided to the Education Manager for review relating to the HAIS award. The examination of the financial account and budget for this project did not identify any problems or deficiencies.

 

Section 2.3.1 - Award No. 3

University of Hawaii (UH)

Section 2.3.2 - Award No. 3 - Six Months in Review

Distance Learning and Instructional Technology continues to make considerable progress toward its defined benchmarks. During the first 6 months of 2000 the University of Hawaii has consistently offered an increasing number of hours of programming related to their degree programs. The review for this reporting period confirms that the UH has met or exceeded all of their defined benchmarks from the plan that was submitted 6 months ago. The plan which contains the UH's projected schedule, goals and objectives, and the benchmarks can be found in Section 4.3.0 on page 11 of the 2000 Educational Access Plan.

During the reporting period 460 students registered for a UH cable course and 418 completed their selected class. These numbers include two students from Kohala High School who took advantage of cable access programming by participating in "early admissions" coursework. This type of activity is "proof of concept" for increasing UH's accessibility into remote areas.

Included in Appendix 5 is a sample copy of a student survey used during the past 6 months and a summary of their findings. While the response from Survey No. 1 was somewhat low (117 students completed the Distance Learning Student Survey) it does define a baseline of appropriate information which can lead to improved student satisfaction and learning. A second survey, which is an evaluation of the students perception at the end of the semester, was also distributed to those enrolled in the distance learning classes (for the Spring 2000 semester), The results of Survey No. 2 were not available at the time of this report.

Section 2.3.3 - Award No. 3 - Supplemental Programming Summary

To facilitate the Supplemental Programming Grant allocation the University of Hawaii (UH) has assembled a committee to handle the decision-making relating to these Programming Grants. This committee was implemented to determine the use of funds as well as the process by which the funds will be distributed. Each of the campuses advertised the availability of the Supplemental Programming funds and solicited proposals which resulted in five awards to date. The programming grants which were awarded for the six month period include: Applied Speech (16 - 1 hr programs) by Honolulu CC & Audiology Associates; Student Services Series (5 - 1 hr programs) by Leeward CC & other UHCC campuses; Study Skills (8 &endash; 1 hr programs) by Leeward CC & other CC Student Learning Centers; You & the Law (15 &endash; 1 hr programs) by Kapiolani CC and Legal Aid; and, Long Term Care (8 &endash; 1 hr programs) by Kapiolani CC and various health care organizations.

The UH Supplemental Programming account has approximately $34,000 remaining and a second round of funding is planned by the committee for September 2000.

Section 2.3.4 - Award No. 3 - Mid-Year Financial Review

During the reporting period the UH submitted all appropriate financial information to the Education Manager and a review of this data did not identify any problems or related deficiencies.

 

Section 3.0 - Funding and Report Summary

The following is a summary of the funding disbursed during this reporting period:

 1999 Educational Access Fee Estimate (for use in 2000)

 $ 949,423.00

 Additional funds from December 1999 underpayment*

 $ 64,979.00

 

Total funds covered in year 2000 reporting

 

$1,014,402.00

Department of Education, State of Hawaii

 Core Programming Activities for 2000

 $347,573.25

 Supplemental Programming 2000 Funds

 $ 38,728.48

 Supplemental Programming 1999 Funds

 $ 14,936.03

 

Total DOE Award

 

$401,237.76

Hawaii Association of Independent Schools

 Core Programming Activities for 2000

 $ 75,000.00

 Supplemental Programming 2000 Funds

 $ 8,344.31

 Supplemental Programming 1999 Funds

 $ 3,218.07

 

Total HAIS Award

 

$ 86,562.38

University of Hawaii

 Core Programming Activities for 2000

 $393,724.00

 Supplemental Programming 2000 Funds

 $ 43,626.21

 Supplemental Programming 1999 Funds

 $ 16,824.90

 

Total UH Award

 

$454,175.11

Other Expenditures

 Less Educational Access management fee

 <$ 40,000.00>

 Less refund to Olelo on overpayment of estimated fees**

 <$ 32,426.75>

 Balance of Educational Access Funding

 - 0 -

Financial Footnotes

*In December 1999 Olelo agreed to funding Educational Access with the balance of the funds from the 1998 franchise fees. Thus EA received additional funds totaling $64,979 in December 1999. The proposed use of these funds (which was required prior to distribution) are detailed below:

I. VIEWER EDUCATION AND IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT

This proposed project earmarked $30,000 for the development of a marketing strategy for the two educational channels with a "viewer education" focus. All of the funds for this program were expended to reimburse Olelo for the overpayment of the EA funds for 2000 and thus the project was cancelled.

II. SUPPLEMENTAL PROGRAMMING FUNDS

The balance of the 1998 funds ($34,979) are to be used for programming grants to educational entities. The reported use of these funds can be found in each of the entity segments in the section identified as: Supplemental Programming Summary.

**Educational Access refunded $32,426.75 to Olelo for overpayment on the projected Educational Access funds. $30,000.00 of this amount was refunded from the viewer education plan (see above) and $2,426.75 was refunded from the DOE Core Programming Activities funds (note: the DOE award was originally $350,000 but is shown as a net figure in the above financial summary).

 

As required under the terms of the Educational Access Agreement, HENC has executed individual agreements with each of the year 2000 award recipients. These agreements set forth the terms and conditions regarding the amount and use of the funds, reporting requirements, and other matters deemed appropriate by HENC for purposes of accountability. All entities are in full compliance with their agreements.

 

Section 3.1 - Report Summary

The Consortium is pleased with the progress demonstrated by the three awards for the first 6 months of the year. As is always the case, the timing of this report falls squarely in the middle of the summer session--which makes reporting difficult. HENC would like to consider flipping the two required reports. This would make the Annual Report due following the close of the school year (July) and the mid-year report coincide with the first semester break (January).

This mid-year report is believed to contain all of the required reporting information as defined in the Educational Access Agreement signed in 1998. If this is not found to be the case the Education Program Manager, upon written request, will attempt to resolve any issues, concerns or conflicts with Olelo and the Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs relating to the matters covered in this document.

This report will be made available online via the HENC website (http://www2.hawaii.edu/~henc/) along with the 2000 Annual Plan, 1999 Annual Report and a copy of the Educational Access Agreement between HENC, Olelo and the Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs.

 

Section 4.0 - Appendices

Appendix 1. - UH Benchmark Matrix

Appendix 2. - DOE Benchmark Matrix

Appendix 3. - Teleschool's Program Sample Evaluation Form

Appendix 4. - Draft HAIS Vision and Mission Statement

Appendix 5. - UH Distance Learning Survey No. 1 with Summary

  •  

     

     

     

    Appendix 1.

    UH Benchmark Matrix

     

  • Name of Grantee: University of Hawaii

     

    Contact Person: Hae K. Okimoto

     

    Grant Dates: Calendar Year 2000

     

    Dates Covered in this Report: January 1 - May 15, 2000

     

    UNITS OF MEASURE

     

    Spring 2000

     

    Summer 2000

     

    Fall 2000

     

    Year to
    Date

     

     

    number of hours of credit courses*

     

     

    750

     

     

    750

     • locally produced

     660

     660

     • purchased/ produced elsewhere

     90

     90

     • live

     225

     225

     • tape delayed

     525

     525

     • rebroadcast

     324.5

     324.5

     

     

     number of hours of non-credit programs*

     

     

    176.5

     

     

    176.5

     • locally produced

     176.5

     176.5

     • purchased/ produced elsewhere

     0

     0

     • live

     15

     15

     • tape delayed

     161.5

     161.5

     • rebroadcast

     79

     79

     

     

    number of hours of informational programs*

     

     

    229.75

     

     

    229.75

     • locally produced

     123.75

     123.75

     • purchased/ produced elsewhere

     106

     106

     • live

     33.75

     33.75

     • tape delayed

     196

     196

     • rebroadcast

     58.5

     58.5

     

    number of credit courses

     

    20

     

    20

     

    number of non-credit programs

     

    4

     

    4

     

    number of informational programs

     

    8

     

    8

     

    number of students enrolled in credit courses

     

    418**

     

    418**

     

    * = 1st broadcast, does not include rebroadcasts

     

    Significant Achievement

     

    **Tracked students between registration and completion. 460 students

     registered for cable courses, 418 completed their courses.

     Honolulu CC had 2 early admission students from Kohala High School.

     Due to their location, these students rarely get to participate in early admission courses.

     

     Appendix 2.
  • DOE Benchmark Matrix

     

  • DOE 2000 Educational Access Progress Report

    Name of Grantee: Hawaii State Department of Education/Teleschool

    Contact Person: Geriann Hong

    Dates Covered in this Report: January 1, 2000 to June 30, 2000

     

    UNITS OF MEASURE

     

    Spring 2000

     

    Fall 2000

     

    YEAR TO DATE

     

    Number of hours of programming

     

    1873

     

     

    1873

     

    Number of hours of credit courses

    • Live
    • Taped delayed
    • Rebroadcast

     

     

    • 290
    • 93
    • 94

     

     

     

    • 290
    • 93
    • 94

     

    Number of hours of non-credit programs

    • Live
    • Taped delayed
    • Rebroadcast

     

     

    • 60
    • 220
    • 219

     

     

     

    • 60
    • 220
    • 219

     

    Number of hours of educational programming

    From non DOE Institutions

    • Taped delayed
    • Rebroadcast

     

     

     

    • 449
    • 448

     

     

     

     

    • 449
    • 448

     

    Number of students enrolled/using programs*

     

    45,000

     

     

    45,000

    * This number is only a broadly defined estimate (see breakout on page 4 of 1999 Annual Report)--as the DOE has no official student registration reporting requirements for Teleschool course usage.

     

     

    Appendix 3.
  • Teleschool's Program
    Sample Evaluation Form

     

  • Teleschool Program Evaluation

     

    We want to provide you with programs which meet your needs. To do this we need your opinions of the programming you have used so far. If you provide the following information by checking the appropriate box, we will be able to select and create the programs you need. Only aggregate data will be released, you will not be identified with your responses.

     

     

     

    STRONGLY DISAGREE

     

    DISAGREE

     

    AGREE

     

    STRONGLY AGREE

     

    N/A

     

    1.

     

    This program successfully addressed DOEs new curriculum standards.

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    2.

     

    This program addressed important cultural values and needs (it was good enough to make a significant impact on the student, and validated the importance of the students culture and community).

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    3.

     

    The program's learning goals were clearly stated in the program, and were appropriate for my class.

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    4.

     

    The program fulfilled its goals, and did so in a way appropriate to the audience.

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    5.

     

    The program's design was appropriate and effective for my students.

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    6.

     

    The program's system of assessments is good and will help guide my instructional decisions.

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    7.

     

    The program had clear instructions and training materials.

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    8

     

    The program could be effectively used in settings other than my own.

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    9

     

    The program clearly specified the conditions and resources needed for its use.

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    10

     

    This program was well worth spending money to develop.

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

    p

     

     Appendix 4.
  • Draft HAIS Vision and Mission Statement

     

  • -- Draft --

    Appendix 4, page 1 of 2

     

    HAIS Mission

    HAIS is an organization of member schools which advocates on behalf of independent education in Hawaii and participates actively in the educational dialogue in our community. It provides services which strengthen our individual schools and supports their efforts to achieve educational quality and excellence for students. It facilitates collaborative efforts among members on issues of mutual concern and promotes partnerships to address shared needs.

    HAIS Technology Vision

    All schools face the daunting challenge of preparing students for a constantly changing world driven by the rapid advancement of information and telecommunication technologies. HAIS responds by supporting those who shape learning for students. At the school level, HAIS assists schools in meeting their individual technology goals. At the level of the collective, HAIS facilitates the sharing of technology resources to enhance teaching and learning in all schools, thereby promoting excellence and equity throughout the independent school community.

    HAIS Technology Mission

    HAIS promotes the use of information and telecommunications technologies among members of all schools to facilitate broad-based participation in the development and delivery of technology programs and processes which serve to enhance teaching and learning.

     

    Strategic Goals

    1. Work cooperatively to strengthen the learning community.

    Coordinate effective use of resources by sharing technology expertise, programs, and resources.

    2. Expand communication systems.

    Promote networking via websites with listservs and email, and cablevision broadcasting.

    3. Support continuous school improvement.

    Encourage the pursuit of new knowledge through designing, researching, and testing innovative learning strategies and programs for cablevision and electronic media.

    4. Create a resource center that contributes to the knowledge base.

  • Organize a lending library of materials developed by the HAIS community that includes:
  • · Programs to develop computer literacy (setting up a home page, searching for information using the Internet, etc.).

    ·Distance learning courses for closed circuit and cable television.

    ·Projects co-created by teachers networked via communication technologies.

  •  

  • -- Draft --

    Appendix 4, page 2 of 2

     

    HAIS/HENC Mission

    HAIS/HENC focuses on coordinating and advancing the use of telecommunications technology by facilitating broad access to educational services such as distance education, interpersonal communication services, and libraries and information resources. Specifically, HAIS/HENC strives to coordinate and support the work of the HAIS community to provide high-quality educational programs for broadcast on cable channel 55 or 56.

    Short-Term Strategic Goals

    All schools have the potential to contribute high-quality programs, but all school do not have the capacity to participate equally to produce cable programs. To set the stage for full participation by all schools, initial HAIS/HENC activities will focus on building capacity to:

    · develop, implement and troubleshoot an infrastructure design and plan for cable programming;

    · train personnel to develop and produce cable programs;

    · tape and edit HAIS programs for broadcast on cablevision;

    · develop and implement a model for a distance learning course; and

    · establish a resource center that includes a library of materials and programs, and basic equipment (e,g., for camera work and post-production editing).

     

     

  •  
  • Appendix 5.

    UH Distance Learning Survey
    No. 1 with Summary
     

  •  

    Distance Learning Student Survey 1

    This survey will help us evaluate the start-up procedures of our distance learning courses. It will also give us a better understanding of the students we service. Please answer the questions as descriptively as possible. Thank you.

    Course

    Site (if applicable)

    Age 18-24 25-44 45+

    Gender Female Male

     

    Yes No

    Do you have an email account? o o

    Do you have a computer at home? o o

    Type of computer (mac or pc)

    Do you have email/web access at home? o o

    Do you have email/ web access at work? o o

    1. Where do you do most of your online work?
    o work

    o home

    o campus lab

    2. How did you hear about this course?

    o degree requirement

    o site coordinator

    o counselor, advisor

    o other (please specify)

    Yes No Not Applicable

    3. Did you have trouble registering for this course? If yes, explain o o NA

    4. Did you have trouble getting your textbook(s) and/or other course materials? If yes, explain. o o NA

    5. How many distance learning courses have you taken?

    6. How do you feel about taking this course?

    o excited and very comfortable

    o okay and somewhat comfortable

    o very uncomfortable

    7. Any other comments or suggestions.

     

     

    Distance Learning Student Survey Summaries

     

    The survey summaries follow. Due to the small numbers of responses from the survey this year, a committee has been formed to 1) review the content and intent of the survey and 2) explore means of receiving greater numbers of responses back from students. This year, the distribution and collection of the surveys was left to the individual campus and faculty.

    Distance Learning Student Survey 1

    This first survey was conducted via various modes. It was included in the student information packet, which was mailed to them upon registering for a credit course. Students were then encouraged to complete the survey and mail or fax it back to the campus. Faculty also placed this survey on their websites, when possible.

    As indicated on the survey, the Distance Learning Student Survey 1 was designed to help the university evaluate the start-up procedures of our distance learning courses, as well as to provide the faculty information about the students in their course.

    Summary Information:

    117 = students completing the survey

    72 = female students

    45 = male students

    23 = age 18-24

    87 = age 25-44

    7 = age 45+

    General Findings:

    • The majority of students 72% did not have email accounts at the beginning of the semester.

    • 55% of students had computers at home, though they did not have email/web access.

    • For 35% of the students, this was their first distance delivered course.

    • Most students did not have trouble registering for their course. However, they did mention that it is a long and sometimes confusing process. These comments were incorporated into the Distance Learning Student Services Website. The website will become fully operational in July 2000, in preparation for the Fall semester registrations.