Project Links
Tiger Shark Research
NWHI Predator Link
Accelerometer
 
Shark Magnet
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Shark Ecotourism
 
BCT
 
Bioprobe
 
pH Tag
 
Giant Trevally
 
MPA Reef Fish Tracking
 
Human Activities
 
 

 

 

 

 

Research Team Biographies
 
Kim Holland
Kim Holland, PhD
My interest is in the physiological ecology of marine organisms and in the interface between animal behavior and physiology. In researching these topics, I try to combine laboratory and fieldwork methods to address the questions at hand. Recently, this has taken the form of tracking the movements of pelagic and nearshore fishes and trying to relate their diel movements, home range sizes and swimming strategies to their foraging success and energy budgets. This research also has resource management ramifications. Originally trained as a chemosensory physiologist, I maintain an interest in this field.
Visit my shark lab website
Carl Meyer
Carl Meyer, PhD, FIBiol
My current research focuses on the ecology and management of sharks and reef fishes. I’m interested in the movement patterns, habitat use and trophic ecology of sharks and fishes, and the navigational abilities of sharks. My research addresses a variety of issues of management concern including impacts of shark ecotourism, shark predation on critically endangered species, effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and impacts of human recreational activities in MPAs.
Visit my faculty page
 
Yannis Papastamatiou
Yannis Papastamatiou, PhD
I am interested in the relationships between movement patterns, foraging ecology, and physiological ecology of elasmobranchs and other fishes. I utilize traditional telemetry techniques (acoustic and satellite), as well as novel "ecological" tags. These are data-loggers that record physiological and behavioral measurements to determine more specifically what an animal is doing (e.g. feeding, hunting, digesting). I am also interested in the ecology of predators on mesophotic reefs (50-100 m depth) and the utilization of technical dive techniques to study deeper reefs. I'm currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Florida Museum of Natural History.
 
 
Nick Whitney
Nick Whitney, PhD
Nick completed graduate school at the University of Hawaii in 2009. His dissertation work focused on movements, reproductive behavior and population genetics of the whitetip reef shark, Triaenodon obesus. Nick is now a postdoctoral researcher in the Center for Shark Research at Mote Marine Lab. Nick's work is focused on quantifying fine-scale aspects of shark behavioral ecology using accelerometers and other data-logging tags.
Read more about Nicks research at Mote
 
Tim Clark
Tim Clark, PhD
Tim completed graduate school at the University of Hawaii in 2010. His dissertation work focuses on the population structure, habitat use, and feeding ecology of the manta ray, Manta birostris. Tim is now a marine ecologist with theNational Park of American Samoa.
 
 
Jon Dale
Jon Dale
Jon completed graduate school at the University of Hawaii in 2011. His dissertation work focused on the ecology and life history of the brown stingray, Dasyatis lata. Jon is now a postdoctoral scholar at the Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University.
 
Melanie Hutchinson
Melanie Hutchinson
I am interested in shark population biology and ecology and the impacts that fisheries have on pelagic shark populations. For my thesis research I am testing different strategies to mitigate shark bycatch in high seas and coastal fisheries. To do this I am exploiting the electrosensory apparatus of sharks and looking at the effects of electropositive metals on their behavior and catch rates.
Visit my UH Zoology Department page.
 
Tom Tinhan
Tom Tinhan
I was a research technician in the shark lab at Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, where I assisted with shark fishing, the deployment of telemetry and ecology tags, and the feeding and husbandry of captive animals. I am interested in using telemetry techniques to monitor the movements of fisheries target species in relation to polluted coastal waters. I'm now working on my Master's degree in the Shark Lab at California State University at Long Beach.
 
 
Christian Clark
Christian Clark
I was a research technician in the shark lab at Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, where I assisted with shark fishing, the deployment of telemetry and ecology tags, and the deployment and recovery of underwater receivers. I graduated from the University of Hawaii Manoa with a B.S. in Global Environmental Science in 2010 and am currently a Rolex Underwater Scholar.