Course Archive

The following LIS courses are no longer available, or in the case of LIS 693/694 "special topic" courses, are currently inactive.

For questions regarding courses in the archive, please contact LISinfo@hawaii.edu.

Note: Each specific LIS 693/694 "special topics" course may be taught a maximum of two times, after which it must be converted to a permanent course in order to be offered again.

  • LIS 100 Using Information Critically

    Course Details

    Use of libraries and information technology for scholarly investigation; examines information literacy, critical thinking, digital libraries, university role in knowledge creation. Cross-listed as CAS 101.
  • LIS 602 Introduction to Multimedia Technology & Resources

    Course Details

    Introduces the latest specialized technologies for providing, managing, and designing information services for libraries. Provides basic experience in desktop productivity software and Web publishing, bibliographic database software, and qualitative and quantitative data analysis.

    Course History

  • LIS 661 Information Sources & Systems in the Humanities

    Course Details

    Lecture course on information structures of humanities disciplines, including fine arts, applied arts, theater arts, literature, music, religion, philosophy. Information cycle, print and digital reference services, information seeking research in the humanities. Field research component.

    Course History

  • LIS 662 Information Sources & Systems in the Social Sciences

    Course Details

    Lecture course on the information structures of social science disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, psychology, education, business, history, political science. Information cycle, print and digital reference services, information-seeking research in the social sciences. Field research component.

    Course History

  • LIS 664 Abstracting & Indexing for Information Services

    Course Details

    Lecture course on theory and practice of enhancing subject access to documents, impact of indexing vocabulary on retrieval; types of controlled vocabularies; evaluation of abstracts in professional databases, creation of abstracts for special local and regional documents.

    Course History

  • LIS 693 Special Topics in Librarianship

    Course Details

    Includes issues of topical interest in the profession. Each course concentrates on one major topic of current interest, such as library service to the aged, reprography, medical librarianship, knowledge management, art librarianship, cartography, etc. Repeatable.
    • LIS 693 Academic Librarianship

      Course Details

      This course explores academic libraries, examining their missions and purposes, their higher educational cultures, their principal constituents, their structural partnerships, their main functions, the ways they are organized, and variations among types of libraries. The course considers political, financial, intellectual, and human resources needed for effective operation.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Access and Care of Indigenous Cultural Knowledge

      Course Details

      This course will explore the overlap between indigenous world view and the professional values of those who might hold representations of indigenous cultural knowledge in their collections. Topics to be explored include: indigeneity and traditional knowledge; cultural protocol; guidance from professional organizations; consultation; shared authority; respectful collection development and management; research methods and decolonization; organization and description of indigenous content; and current events and 'hot topics' as they arise.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Business Information Sources & Services

      Course Details

      Study of key sources of business information in accounting, business law, consumer information, finance, industry, international business, job information, management, marketing, small business, taxation, and related areas. Focus is on meeting the user needs for specific types of business information, including those of management executives and other professionals, entrepreneurs, individual investors, and researchers. Emphasizes the use of value-added print and electronic resources, including business resources via the Internet. Includes development of search strategy, building and managing a business reference collection, and reference services to the business community.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Cartographic & Geographic Issues for Librarians

      Course Details

      The course focuses on the geographic elements of information and the ways in which new geographic technologies offers new opportunities and challenges for librarians and information specialists. Students will be introduced to a data model that can be applied to objects, persons, and events in a way that facilitates geographic analysis.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Copyright & Libraries

      Course Details

      Examines issues in copyright and intellectual property pertaining to libraries of all sorts from the perspective of both theory and praxis. Beginning with a history of copyright, we will analyze theories of copyright and its application, especially in the digital age. The practical aspects of copyright as it applies to licensing contracts for electronic resources will be explored, including the economics of licensing. Attention will be given to interpretations of copyright law, fair use, liability and the responsibility of the individual librarian to introduce copyright concepts to library users. The approach will be worldwide, but case studies and current issues in copyright and intellectual property in the United States will predominate.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Diverse Communities

      Course Details

      Library users are often members of different formal and informal communities, related to their cultural heritage, their careers or professions, or even their leisure interests. This course will investigate strategies and resources for serving users in different types of communities, including: diverse cultural and linguistic groups and nationalities; varied affinity groups like weaving clubs or online cancer support forums; users from many type of institutions including schools, hospitals, and prisons; and scholars and researchers in various subject areas. Issues in information seeking behaviors, promotion and advocacy, policy, and library resources will be discussed. This course is appropriate for those seeking careers in all types of libraries.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 English Children's Literature

      Course Details

      This course is on the development (in England) of children's literature as a genre--its history, classics, and the influence and contributions of iconic authors and illustrators. Topics/critical issues to be discussed include contrasting visions of childhood, the power of traditional literature (folktales, legends, nursery rhymes), the commodification and commercialization of literary characters/texts, the popularized presentation of texts and authors in films, and the ability of texts to entertain, criticize society, present values, and help children to find meaning. Also, the role of English children's literature in developing national consciousness and values, Englishness.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Film Collections in Libraries

      Course Details

      This course presents an overview of film from its historical antecedents to the present and how it fits into the bibliographical structure and sources in science, social science, and humanities. Topics include a general discussion of the history, language, technology, and business of film;
      film theories and genres; representation of cultures and societies in film; developing and preserving a film collection.

      Course History

      • Syllabus Kellett & Paseng, Spring 2012
    • LIS 693 History of LIS Education

      Course Details

      In celebration of the UHM LIS Program's 50th Anniversary, we will be offering a special graduate seminar exploring the history of LIS education. The ultimate goal of the course will be the creation of a scholarly e-book on the history of libraries, archives, and LIS education in Hawaii. In order to meet this goal, this rigorous seminar will equip LIS and CIS students with an introduction to historiography and historical research methods, and an overview of librarianship and higher education in Hawaii. Students will be doing a lot of reading, original research, some teaching, and work in a group.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Indigenous Librarianship

      Course Details

      The course provides a forum for introducing and discussing issues, activities, philosophies, and orientation to working with and for indigenous populations in providing library services. Students will discuss protocol, policies, issues, communities, key organizations and events, library services, resources/reference titles, and settings. Along the way, students will prepare and deliver presentations on tribal settings and issues, abstracts of prospective research papers, abstracts of fundable services, and a mini-pathfinder of resources on selected topic.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Information Resources in the Health Sciences

      Course Details

      This course will cover the most important healthcare related information resources within a context of providing reference and information services. It will cover primary, secondary and tertiary sources in the following areas: medical, dental, pharmacy, nursing, allied health, consumer health and informatics. We will look at evidence based medical and nursing information resources in terms of when and how to use them most effectively. We will learn about the National Library of Medicine’s Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) thesaurus and the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). We will also learn how to compare and evaluate similar resources and how to select the best resources. We will learn how to do efficient and effective searches in the major healthcare information resources.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Library Architecture & Planning

      Course Details

      The goal of this course is to provide students with the knowledge necessary to participate effectively in or to manage a library renovation project or a new building project. Emphasis will be placed on the development of skills which students need to evaluate personnel, systems, and services during a
      construction project so that the new or renovated library facility is cost-effective and appropriate to users’ needs. Students will gain a greater understanding of the architecture profession and the interdisciplinary nature of building projects.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Library Leadership Seminar

      Course Details

      The future of librarianship depends on a new generation of leaders to manage and administer the information centers of the new century. This course is designed to help prepare students to fill these positions. It will examine the fundamental elements of leadership, including structural, political, human resource, and symbolic aspects, and how they apply to the library environment. Course content will include study of leaders in; history and literature, feature films and documentaries, case studies, and periodical literature. Students review the relative merits of various leaders through class discussion and writing. Students will learn how to think through complex leadership issues and apply leadership principles to provide maximal outcomes.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Library Services for Youth in Custody

      Course Details

      This course focuses on library services to youth in custody, with an emphasis on youth in juvenile detention centers. The course covers a variety of topics including collection development, programming, outreach, and intellectual freedom.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Rare Book Librarianship

      Course Details

      Rare book librarianship is an object-based discipline and relies upon keen observational skills, as well as historical knowledge. By carefully examining physical aspects of a book (paper, typography-printer, illustration, binding, provenance, etc.) you can understand aspects of its history in addition to the text. The UHM library's Rare Book Collection will be the primary class resource for examining aspects of the printed book in the West from the 15th century through the 20th century. The fundamentals of defining and developing rare book collection policy will be considered as well as creating a place for rare book collections in today's landscape of knowledge and information literacy

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Reader's Advisory

      Course Details

      A course on serving reading needs, especially those of adults, and on identifying the appeal of books and genres and helping readers to select books they will like. It addresses the major elements of reader advisory services and covers the fictional genres (mystery/detective, adventure, romance, Christian fiction, horror, science fiction, and more), and nonfiction [including self-help, biography, and more). The course also looks at readers' advisory as a reference service, provides research on reading and experience in using RA resources, giving book talks, and participating in literature circles and book clubs/discussions.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Reader's Advisory for Adult Popular Fiction

      Course Details

      An examination of the nature and societal functions of a variety of mass media-generated adult reading materials and their relationship to the contemporary field of library and information studies.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Records Management

      Course Details

      Basic theory and principles concerning the management of records within a legal framework--including creation, media selection, use, inactivity, and destruction.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Resources in Hawaiian & Pacific Librarianship

      Course Details

      This course will alternate between a practical introduction to Hawaiʻi and Pacific Islands library resources and an exploration of issues related to the profession as practiced by academic librarians in a special collections setting. Through lectures and guest speakers we cover special topics, including: current issues in contemporary Hawaiʻi and the Pacific; history and documentation; genealogy, biography and demography; early and modern indigenous literature, collection development and management, science sources and more. Ultimately, this course is designed to build proficiency in the use of Hawaiʻi and Pacific Islands research materials in general and the Hawaiʻian and Pacific Collections at Hamilton Library in particular.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Responding to Reading in Libraries

      Course Details

      This course explores reader response theory as a foundational understanding of the reading process in library contexts and settings. Consideration of ways in which responsive reading effects various literary formats available in libraries. Critical examination of ways in which library services impacts reading engagement and interests of library users. This course is particularly useful for those interested in public, school, and academic librarianship.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Serials & Electronic Resources Librarianship

      Course Details

      An introduction to challenges and issues of Serials and Electronic Resources Librarianship. Coverage areas include budgeting, licensing, acquisitions and the management of resources as well as staff.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 The Graphic Novel

      Course Details

      This seminar explores graphic novels and comics in libraries for all ages with an emphasis on children and young adult titles. We will study collection development, programming, the history of graphics, censorship, and booktalking. A particular focus will be on Asian and Asian American titles including web comics and online comic resources.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Young Voices in Times of War: Literature for Children and Young Adults

      Course Details

      During times of war, children and teens are forced to grow up more quickly than they would during times of peace. Many will have to make difficult choices and face adult issues. This course will focus on stories told through unique voices of children and young adults who happened to grow up while the world they knew around them was radically changing. When contemporary children and teens read about the impact war has on the fictional characters (especially those of similar ages) as well as true stories of people who grew up in the midst of war, they will inevitably from a literary relationship with and develop empathy for the characters they read about. By humanizing "the other" through reading, we can hope to instill in upcoming generations the importance of cultural understanding an the necessity of teaching peace in an increasingly globalized world.

      Course History

    • LIS 693 Youth Community Engagement

      Course Details

      This course provides a better understanding of how various disciplines of study define youth, how groups of youth define themselves, and how institutions shape youth’s lives. It also addresses youth behaviors and youth activism and community affiliation. The course is focused on how to apply knowledge about youth and their lives to the library setting.

      Course History

  • LIS 694 Special Topics in Information Technology

    Course Details

    Includes issues of topical interest in information technology. Each course concentrates on one major topic of current interest, such as information transfer, networks, library information systems, artificial intelligence applications. Repeatable three times, up to nine credits.
    • LIS 694 Digital Archives

      Course Details

      Covers archival theory as it applies to digital records, including preservation, long-term access and the assessment of authenticity of the material. The goal of this course is to provide students with knowledge on the role of technology in archival work, at the theoretical and pragmatic level, through lectures, guest speaker presentations, educational visits, lab and in-class activities, and class discussions. The students will gain insight into relevant technology raised issues and will learn what kind of technology is applied in archives.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Digital Content Management

      Course Details

      This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the organization of digital content, and explores the aspects of content management that arise from the field of library and information science, such as reference services, information-seeking behavior, and knowledge representation. In addition to examining the theoretical foundation one may use in the design of a content management initiative, we will also cover some of the technical skills necessary to implement such an initiative via Drupal, an open-source content management system. This course assumes no prior experience with Drupal or other content management systems.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Digital Curation

      Course Details

      This course is structured around putting the ISO’s Open Archival Information System (OAIS) Reference Model and the Digital Curation Centre’s Digital Lifecycle Model into practice. In this course students will learn digital curation theories and workflows that can be used in the management of born-digital records. This course will be hybrid in nature with a combination of onsite and online sessions. A major component of this course will focus on hands-on activities using open source tools to perform basic digital forensics analysis and archival arrangement and description.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Evidence-based Practices for Libraries

      Course Details

      The course centers on the study and application of evidenced-based practices in various library settings. It focuses on the evaluation of library programs, services, and infrastructure. Students will be introduced to real-life situations that involve data analysis in various situations. Activities include the use of data to evaluate libraries to inform decisions with qualitative and quantitative evidence. Evaluation strategies include cost-benefit, efficiency, effectiveness, opportunity, educational outcomes, and patron satisfaction.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Informatics & Information Design

      Course Details

      The emerging field of "Informatics" broadly describes the study and practice of creating, storing, finding, manipulating and sharing information. Combining a concern for technology, information, and humans, informatics considers how information technology is designed and used in our society, specifically in such fields as Health Information Science and Business. The course will focus on website design from an information science perspective, with specific attention to the interaction between design, institutional needs, and available technological tools. The course will combine academic discussions with applied projects. The roles that librarians can have in designing web-based resources will be a central theme. In the end, the successful student will be able to design web pages that integrate dynamic data and discuss the design, content, and assessment strategies in a thoughtful and effective way.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Information Behavior

      Course Details

      This seminar takes place in immersive virtual world platforms including Second Life (SL), Inworldz, Heritage Key, Blue Mars and other virtual information environments. The seminar allows students to examine virtual world innovations including avatar-mediated library services, immersive educational environments, historic recreations, and others. Students join inworld professional groups and interest groups; study avatar information needs and information seeking behavior; create virtual interactive collections, subject guides and pathfinders; acquire virtual world information literacy (VWIL) and basic building skills; and master information sharing and presentation tools. Projects involve students in applying skills learned via inworld tasks in produsing VW informative events. Project-based, research and professional focus, inworld and classroom workshop format.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Information, Technology & Society: Philosophical Dimensions

      Course Details

      The principle goal of this course is to introduce students to philosophical issues associated with technologies of information.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

      Course Details

      GIS is used in nearly every aspect of our lives. From getting water and electricity to our homes, to helping farmers put food on our plates, and to even help us maneuver around town when the zip lane is shut down! Nearly every industry has a need for GIS and there is high demand in the job market for people who can make maps and manage assets using it. This course will introduce the main concepts of GIS and teach the student how to use it in whichever career path they choose. There will be detailed tutorials and examples to aid in the students’ learning, a field exercise to learn how to collect data using a GPS, as well as a final project that will be developed in stages throughout the semester and centered on the students’ educational and professional goals.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Introduction to Multimedia Technology & Resources

      Course Details

      Introduces the latest and specialized technologies for providing, managing, and designing information services within a library environment. Provides basic experience in desktop productivity software and web publishing, bibliographic database software, and qualitative and quantitative data analysis.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Managing Online Resources in Library Systems Consortia

      Course Details

      There are increasing numbers of types and formats of library materials. This makes it difficult for libraries to purchase as many or as many types of materials as they would like. This short course will introduce students about library consortia, what’s like to work in them, and various ways of evaluating electronic resources/ebooks, etc. that a consortia may negotiate in price for members and to get discounts.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Medical Information Retrieval

      Course Details

      This course is meant to help students gain an understanding of the field of medical information retrieval especially the impact of medical informatics technology, as well as the confidence and skills to search for, evaluate, and deliver medical information in a variety of contexts, ranging from working with health care professionals to the general public. The class is centered on case based learning experiences that will connect theory and practice. By the end of the class, students will be able to understand current trends in medical information, expertly search the biomedical literature, be able to evaluate medical resources, deliver value-added health related content to users, and become aware of the many future possibilities in the biomedical information field. This course is appropriate for any who wish to become more confident in working with health science information.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Metadata Management in Memory Institutions

      Course Details

      Metadata is a fundamental issue for anyone involved in the management of information resources in a networked environment. Information resources in digital format, in particular, largely rely on metadata to be findable and accessible for a prolonged period of time. This introductory course explores the use of metadata in modern memory institutions such as libraries, archives, and, to a lesser extent, museums. Students are guided through the theoretical and practical principles of metadata and the hands-on application of those principles. The ultimate goal of this course is to develop the fundamental knowledge and skills needed to be able to address the right metadata questions in the right context in developing and managing resources.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Mobile Library Services

      Course Details

      There is a mobile revolution taking place in the twenty-first century. More people are talking, texting, and accessing the internet on their mobile devices. This course provides an overview of mobile applications and services currently being provided by libraries and also some services libraries will want to consider that are not widely available yet. Students will have the opportunity to learn about a variety of services and applications available on mobile devices. They will also have the opportunity to do further research and study on a mobile library service of interest to them. Through readings, discussions, exercises, lectures, and guest presentations, students will learn how libraries can effectively offer mobile services to their patrons.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Moving Image Archives

      Course Details

      This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts, principles and technology of moving image archives for professionals tasked with caring for archival audiovisual materials. This course covers methods and strategies for the processing, preservation, and accessibility of archival videotapes and films. Topics include survey of moving image repositories, critical analysis of archival footage, format identification, digitization strategies, equipment and vendor considerations.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Planning & Developing Digital Library Instruction

      Course Details

      This course introduces relevant principles and guidelines for instructional design that influence digital instruction in various library settings. Students develop an instructional plan for a specific library context and patron need. They also create a digital learning activity to implement the plan. The activities may focus on a range of user needs including refining information search strategies, promoting literacy, accessing specific databases, dealing with key aspects of the research process, or assisting with on-demand reference services.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Research Methods

      Course Details

      Internet studies have become increasingly important to a number of fields, from communication and science to digital media and game studies. This course aims to provide a basic understanding of methods, techniques and approaches to Internet studies. It will cover both qualitative and quantitative approaches to study identities, communities, institutions as well as characteristics, credibility, bias and cultural differences associated with the information presentation. In this course you will learn about survey design, ethnographic and content analysis methods of studying Internet.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Seminar on Information Communication Policy Issues

      Course Details

      This course will examine some of the issues related to information dissemination and access via telecommunication networks. In order to discuss these issues, we will look at the technological infrastructure as well as the political power structures behind the major telecommunication networks. We will look at the roles of entities such as the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) in the design and management of global telecommunication networks. We will talk about the potentials and the conundrums these new (and some not so new) technologies pose in a world of unevenly distributed resources and competing ideologies.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Tools for Community Advocacy

      Course Details

      Community advocacy requires efficient and effective communication about issues that affect libraries. This combines original research, synthesis of existing research, opinion canvassing, and speaking to local and broader-based stakeholders. All of this information must be collated and presented in ways that make a strong case for the desired result. This course will examine techniques for doing, communicating and presenting this sort of research to support a particular population, library program or social issue. Students will learn to use online tools to collect and display data and to interleave statistics and storytelling to provide a compelling case for support of their chosen topic. Sample topics can include the digital divide, early childhood education, makerspaces in libraries, copyright reform, the library bill of rights or other topics of the students' choosing.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Virtual Librarianship

      Course Details

      The focus is on professionalization in this hybrid technology-intensive seminar that takes place in a classroom lab, online on the Web and in the immersive virtual world platform of Second Life (SL). The seminar allows students to explore technology innovations in librarianship, including Web 2.0 applications, online professional development services, and avatar-mediated library services. Conducted in a collaborative, project-based, online, inworld, and classroom workshop format.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Virtual Library Services

      Course Details

      Through readings, discussions, exercises, lectures, and guest presentations, students will learn how libraries can effectively offer virtual services to their patrons. Students will do in-depth research on a topic of special interest and write a research paper/proposal and an online presentation on their topic of interest.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Visions of the Library

      Course Details

      The goals of this course are (1) to analyze how conceptions and misconceptions of libraries and information services are perpetuated through popular culture, (2) to analyze how the medium of digital video influences the information communicated through it, and (3) to learn how to use digital video as a tool for advocacy and outreach, to create our own visions of the library. Topics covered include visual culture, ethics and ownership, narrative structure, how sequencing and juxtaposition of multimedia elements influence information perception, how popular culture images are created and perpetuated via digital video, and implications for information systems and services.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Visual Information Science

      Course Details

      An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of visual information science related to visual information (data) collection, analysis, processing, transmission, utilization, and communication with emphasis on psychological, social, and cultural aspects of visual information in modern and digital libraries and information centers.

      Course History

    • LIS 694 Web 3.0 for Librarians & Information Professionals

      Course Details

      This course will give students the ability to understand new technology trends in the 2- to 5-year time frame and position both themselves, their employers and their patrons for productive implementation of these computer-based innovations. Expect plenty of expert speakers, case-studies, hands-on demos, forum discussions and reflective writing exercises.

      Course History

  • LIS 695 Seminar in Research in Library & Information Science

    Course Details

    Various methodologies and application to problems of librarianship. Evaluation of research studies, developing, writing, critiquing proposals. Experience with statistical packages for data analysis.
  • LIS 715 Seminar in Information Policy & Planning

    Course Details

    Public and organization information policy and planning in society; public access; impact and issues of information technology and the Internet; privacy, security, globalization, intellectual freedom, copyright issues.