Other Departments

Students may take up to 6 elective credit hours from other departments or colleges as part of the MLISc degree requirements if they are relevant to their area of interest and are approved in advance by an adviser. Students would need to satisfy all the prerequisites for the respective courses.

Not all courses are appropriate; some useful courses may not be available because departments usually give priority to their own students within the limits of available faculty and facilities.

The following are representative of courses considered relevant for some specializations in librarianship:

  • Communications 611 Communications Theories
  • Communications 612 Comm Research Methodologies
  • Decision Sciences 684 Decision Support Systems
  • Decision Sciences 687 End-User Computing
  • History 602 Seminar in Historiography
  • Music 661 Bibliography & Library Research in Music

We particularly encourage students to explore courses related to Hawaii, Asia and the Pacific.  The following list of courses was compiled by LIS Curriculum Committee student members Annemarie Aweau, Keahiahi Long and Shavonn Matsuda, and approved by LIS Faculty January 2014.

    • ANTH    411    Museum Anthropology

Anthropological study of museums and related sites of cultural production (historic sites, memorials, theme parks)

    • ANTH    461    Southeast Asian Archaeology

Prehistory and protohistory of Southeast Asia and of Southeast Asian contacts with East Asia, India, Australia, and Oceania. Pre: junior standing or consen

    • ANTH    464    Hawaiian Archaeology

Archaeological perspective in Hawai’i’s past; origins of Hawaiians; early settlement and culture change; settlement patterns and material culture; historic sites preservation.

    • ANTH    608    History and Memory

History and collective memory as culturally formed and politically contested realities. The role of narrative, ritual, and media technologies in shaping representations of the past. Pre: graduate standing.

    • ANTH    640    Methods and Theory in Archaeology

Focused seminars pertaining to distinct areas of archaeological method and theory. (B) analytical; (C) environment/landscape; (D) applied archaeology; (E) economic/resources; (F) survey/locational.

    • ANTH    645     Historic Preservation

Federal, state, and local laws and regulations that regulate and provide protection to significant archaeological and historical resources in Hawai’i and the region. (Alt. years: spring only) (Cross-listed as AMST 645).

    • ANTH    676    Recording Historic and Cultural Resources

Techniques in recording and evaluation of historic buildings and other resources, with an emphasis on field recordings and state and federal registration procedures. (Cross-listed as AMST 676 and PLAN 676)

    • AMST     457    Museum Interpretations

Studies the interpretive strategies and methods used by museums to communicate with visitors in museums, art galleries, historic sites, parks, and related places. Considers how interpretations contribute to cultural knowledge.

    • AMST     474    Preservation: Hawaii, Asia, and the Pacific

Lectures and discussions on historic preservation issues in Hawai’i, Asia, and the Pacific. Emphasis on indigenous and national expressions. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as ARCH 474)

    • AMST     475    Documentation of Historic Architecture

Study and documentation of existing buildings, structures, sites of historic and/or cultural significance, including field measurements and drawings, historical research, photo documentation, and preparation of archival drawings to be deposited in the Library of Congress. Documentation conducted according to standards of the Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record (HABS/HAER).

    • AMST     645    Historic Preservation

Federal, state, and local laws and regulations that regulate and provide protection to significant archaeological and historical resources in Hawai’i and the region. (Alt. years: spring only) (Cross-listed as ANTH 645)

    • AMST     670    Comparative Methods in American Studies

Examines approaches to American studies that use comparison as a primary method. Comparison of histories, institutions, of phenomena between the U.S. and another country as well as among communities in the U.S. Graduate standing only. Co-requisite: 600 or 601 or 602, or consent.

    • AMST    675    Preservation: Theory and Practice

History and philosophy of historic preservation movement. Analysis of values and assumptions, methodologies and tactics, implications for society and public policy. (Cross-listed as ARCH 628 and PLAN 675)

    • AMST     676    Recording Historic and Cultural Resources

Techniques in recording and evaluation of historic buildings and other resources, with an emphasis on field recordings and state and federal registration procedures. (Cross-listed as ANTH 676 and PLAN 676)

    • AMST     677    Historic Preservation Planning

Local-level historic preservation, with an emphasis on historic districts, design guidelines, regulatory controls, and community consensus-building. (Cross-listed as PLAN 677)

    • AMST    683    Museums: Theory, History, and Practice

History and theory of museums and related institutions (art galleries, historic houses, zoos, parks). Relationship between museums, collections, and communities. Introduction to governance, planning, legal, and ethical concerns.

    • AMST     684    Museums and Collections

Work of museums and professionals (registrars, collections managers, conservators, curators and others) in the care of collections, interpretive studies of museum displays and collections and field trips. Pre: 683 (or concurrent) or consent.

    • AMST     685    Museums and Education

Overview of museum education including museum learning theories, informal learning programs, audience research, national and international policies and reports, and community projects. Pre: 683 (or concurrent) or consent. (Cross-listed as EDCS 685)

    • AMST     686    Museum Studies Practicum

Applies coursework in museum studies to hands-on activities under the direction of practicing professionals and university faculty. Museum studies certificate students only. Pre: consent.

    • AMST     695    Historic Preservation Practicum

Applies course work in historic preservation to hands-on activities under the direction of practicing professionals and University faculty. Historic preservation certificate students only.

    • AMST     696    Preservation Field Study

On-site historic preservation field study. Site will rotate. Academic and hands-on preservation training. (B) Hawai’i; (C) Asia; (D) Pacific. Each alpha repeatable up to 18 credits. Pre: consent.

    • EALL    603     Bibliographical and Research Methods

Traditional and modern references and other library materials basic to research in all areas of East Asian studies: (C) Chinese; (J) Japanese; (K) Korean. Pre: CHN 402 for (C); JPN 407 (alpha) for (J); KOR 402 for (K).

    • ENG    470    Studies in Asia/Pacific Literature

Intensive study of selected problems, issues, traditions, genres, or writers relating to Asia and the Pacific. Repeatable one time. Pre: 320 and one other 300-level ENG course; or consent.

    • ENG 479     Modern Pacific Women’s Poetry

Critical examination of modern indigenous women’s poetry from the Pacific Islands. Thematic concentration on land, family, sexual and national oppression. Pre: two ENG DL courses; second may be taken concurrently; or consent. (Cross-listed as HWST 494) DL

    • ENG     480    Studies in Literature and Folklore

Intensive study of selected problems, issues, traditions, or genres in folklore and oral traditions and their performance and transformations within specific social and cultural contexts. Repeatable one time. Pre: 320 and one other 300-level ENG course; or consent.

    • ENG    772    Seminar in Literatures of Hawai’i

Introduction to comparative literature; relationship of Hawaiian to other literatures; sources and influences. Repeatable one time.

    • ENG    773    Seminar in Hawaiian Literature

Intensive study of selected issues, genres, and traditions in Hawaiian literature written in English or translated from Hawaiian into English. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Fall only)

    • ES    480    Qualitative Research Methods

Introduction to qualitative data collection methods; explore methods of analyzing data including grounded theory method, discourse analysis, and narrative analysis and those used in ethnic, gender, and community studies.

    • ES    486    Peoples of Hawaii

Critically examines the historical and contemporary experiences of various people of Hawai’i and utilizes anthropological and ethnic studies approaches to study identity, race, ethnicity, culture, language, gender, sex, class, land, and residence. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as ANTH 486)

    • ES    493    Oral History: Theory and Practice

Literature and methodology; project design. Students develop and execute an oral history project.

    • HAW    435 (Alpha)    Problems in Translation

Problems in translation of: (B) legal documents; (C) newspapers. Pre: 302 or consent.

    • HAW    484    Hawaiian Poetry

Historical survey and analysis of poetry found in traditional chants, folk songs, modern poetry written in Hawaiian. Interpreting and composing Hawaiian poetry. Pre: 302 and consent, or 401.

    • HAW    601     Kakau Moolelo

Analyzes various genres of written Hawaiian literature. HAW majors only. Pre: graduate standing and 402, or consent.

    • HAW    602    Kaka’olelo Oratory

A survey of oral performance styles to build increased oral skills. Pre: graduate standing and 601, or consent.

    • HAW    605    Ka Hana Noi’i (Research Methods)

Research methodology course utilizing active research in the major repositories of Hawaiian language materials and Hawaiian-related knowledge. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing and acceptance in the Hawaiian MA program, or consent. (Once a year)

    • HAW    625    Mo’olelo Hawai’i

Intensive study, research, and analysis of Hawaiian history. Repeatable two times with consent of advisor. Pre: 402 or consent.

    • HAW    638 (Alpha)     Na Mea Kakau/Na Haku Mo’olelo

Intensive study of an individual author, his/her works and nuances of his/her works. (E) J. H. Kanepu’u; (I) S. M. Kamakau. Pre: 601 or consent. (Once a year)

    • HAW    684    Noi’i Mele

Intensive study focusing on original compositions of Hawaiian poetry and song. Pre: 402 and 484, or consent.

    • HWST    440    Mahele Land Awards

Practical guide to the researching of land awards and change in title for a single ahupua’a, 1848 to present. Focus on field trips. Pre: 342.

    • HWST    494    Modern Pacific Women’s Poetry

Critical examination of modern indigenous women’s poetry from the Pacific Islands. Thematic concentration on land, family, sexual and national oppression. Pre: two ENG DL courses; second may be taken concurrently; or consent. (Cross-listed as ENG 479)

    • HWST    602    Hawaiian Archival Research

Research seminar aimed at familiarizing students with the rich historical primary sources existent in various archives in Honolulu. A-F only. Pre: 107, 270, 341 (or concurrent), 342 (or concurrent), and one of the following: 343 (or concurrent) or 390 (or concurrent) or 490 (or concurrent); or consent.

    • HWST    603    Review of Hawaiian Literature

Seminar in review of Hawaiian literature to understand the significance of secondary sources in Hawaiian subjects. This makes up part of the Hawaiian Studies graduate core. A-F only. Pre: 107, 270, 341 (or concurrent), 342 (or concurrent), and one of the following: 343 (or concurrent) or 390 (or concurrent) or 490 (or concurrent); or consent.

    • HWST    620    Ike Pono-Visual/Cultural Interpretations

Graduate seminar and visual studio that examines (from a Kanaka Maoli viewpoint) colonial imaging; collecting and site of contestation; resilience and resistance; and re-righting. A-F only. Pre: 107C, and one course from 220-225, and one course from 320-325; or consent. (Fall only)

    • HWST    621    Ike Maka-Visual/Cultural Knowledge

Graduate seminar and visual studio that carefully examines and develops critical consciousness–from a Kanaka Maoli viewpoint–visual hegemony, rhetorical tropes; and representation–imag(in)ing and re-imag(in)-ing. HWST majors only. A-F only. Pre: 620 or consent. (Spring only)

    • HWST    640    Mo’olelo ‘Oiwi: Historical Perspectives

Research seminar for developing interpretations of the past from Native Hawaiian and foreign world views with particular emphasis on understanding the meaning of culturally-based knowledge systems. A-F only.

    • HWST    671     Kumu Kahiki: Pacific Life Narratives in Mixed Media and Literature

Research seminar in relevant literary traditions, histories of interaction, colonization, and literary politics in the Pacific region through the examination of life narratives in mixed media and literature. A-F only. HWST majors only. Pre: 603 (or concurrent) or consent. (Once a year)

    • HIST     612    Ethnographic History

Critical inquiry into historical representations of the “other” and ways in which modern historians have used culture and other anthropological concepts to write and think about the past.

    • HIST     650    Seminar: Comparative Asia

This reading seminar in the comparative history of modern Asia will introduce graduate students to themes, particularly in social, cultural, and intellectual history, which lend themselves to comparison across the region. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Alt. years)

    • HIST     675    Seminar: Pacific History

Reading and research on major themes and issues. (B) South Pacific; (C) Micronesia; (D) 19th century; (E) 20th century. Repeatable one time per alpha. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

    • HIST    677    Seminar: History of Hawai’i

Reading seminar with short papers required. Covers Kingdom of Hawai’i and 20th-century Hawai’i in alternate years. Repeatable one time. (Alt. years: fall)

    • HIST     678    Seminar: Hawaiian Historical Research Documents and Methods

Research and writings emphasizing the interpretation of Hawaiian and English language primary sources. Development of source materials, approaches, and methods in Hawaiian history. A-F only. Graduate standing only. Pre: HAW 301 with a B or better, or instructor consent.

    • HIST     699    Directed Research

Individual research topics. (1) American; (2) Pacific; (3) Japanese; (4) European; (5) English; (6) Chinese; (7) Russian; (8) Hawaiian; (9) South Asian; (10) Southeast Asian; (11) Korean. Restricted to plan A (thesis) students. Maximum 2 credit hours. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent.

    • PACS     601    Learning Oceania

Graduate seminar. Introduction to the nature and origins of Pacific Studies as an organized field of study. Epistemological, conceptual, political and ethical issues facing students of the region today. Co-requisite: 602.

    • PACS     602    Re/Presenting Oceania: Pacific and American Perspectives

Graduate seminar. Critical analysis of the way physical, social and cultural aspects of Oceania have been represented in scholarly and popular media. Co-requisite: 601.

    • PACS    690    Graduate Seminar: Change in the Pacific

Interrelationship of change in selected Pacific Islands regions, institutions, and processes. Repeatable two times. Pre: consent.

    • POLS    612    Hawaiian Political Thought: Theory and Method/Na Mana’o Politika Hawai’i

Study of Hawaiian political thought in writing from ca. 1825 to the present, with emphasis on theory and research methods. Pre: 303, HAW 402 and HAW 428; or consent. (Cross-listed as HAW 612)

    • POLS    642     Indigenous Peoples and Western Imperialism

Historical examination of U.S. and European imperialisms, including national narratives, politics, and impacts upon indigenous peoples in the Americas, Pacific, and Asia. Repeatable one time.

    • POLS    680    Asian and/or Pacific Politics

Political development, international relations, decision-making processes, and systems of political thought in all or part of Asia and/or the Pacific. Repeatable three times.

    • POLS    684    Contemporary Native Hawaiian Politics

Study of political and social movements, political status, national and cultural identities, and issues of representation of Native Hawaiians.

    • POLS    686    Politics of Hawai’i

Examinations from several perspectives of the political, economic, and cultural forces that historically formed Hawai’i and contemporary political themes, issues, and processes. Pre: graduate standing.