Diane Nahl


Professor
Library & Information Science Program
Information & Computer Sciences Department
Hamilton Library
2550 McCarthy Mall
Honolulu, HI 96822

Fax: (808) 956-5835
nahl@hawaii.edu
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~nahl


“My teaching philosophy is student-centered and emphasizes the multicultural character of LIS students. To maintain this, and to keep students actively engaged during class periods, each session involves three or four different activities. I believe that student learning is enhanced in collaborative learning environments using techniques such as small group discussions, dyadic and group assignments, and joint problem-solving exercises. Because theoretical principles must be integrated with practical knowledge to develop critical thinking, fieldwork is important. These experiences give students opportunities to find professional role models, to critically reflect on the nature of professional work, to understand users’ information needs and concerns, and to extend their knowledge and expertise to a variety of user groups.”


Education

Ph.D. Communication and Information Sciences, University of Hawaii, 1993.
M.L.S. Graduate School of Library Studies, University of Hawaii, 1983.
B.A. Psychology, University of Hawaii, 1976.

Professional Background

1990- present, Associate Professor, Library and Information Science Program, University of Hawaii
1985-89 Reference Librarian, Hawaii Loa College and University of Hawaii

Professional Affiliations

Member, Hawaii Library Association(College and Universities Section Chair, 1987-88).
Member, Association for Library and Information Science Education.
Member, American Library Association (Reference and User Services Association),Library Instruction Round Table,Library Research Round Table
Member, Association of College and Research Libraries (Instruction Section)
Member, American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T), Information Seeking and Use (SIG USE), Human Computer-Interaction (SIG HCI)

(Clicking on these links will take you outside of the UH LIS site.)

Fields of Interest

Human Computer Interaction
Information Services
Information Literacy

Recent Courses Taught

LIS 601 Introduction to Reference & Information Services
LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy
LIS 677 Human Dimension in Information Systems
LIS 694 Virtual World Librarianship
LIS 694 Information Behavior in Virtual Environments

Current Research Interests

Human-computer interaction; information behavior; affective and cognitive information processing

Awards and Honors

2005 Meritorious Information Behavior Paper Award, Special Interest Group on
Information Needs, Seeking and Use (SIG USE), American Society for
Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T). For: Affective and Cognitive
Information Behavior: Interaction Effects in Internet Use. Proceedings of the
68th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Information Science&
Technology, October 28-November 2, Charlotte, NC, Medford, NJ: Information
Today. http://www.asis.org/Conferences/AM05/program.html

2000 “LIRT’s Top Twenty for 1999″ Award, LIRT (Library Instruction
Round Table, ALA) News (June): For: Creating User-Centered Instructions
for Novice End-Users. Reference Services Review 27(3) (1998): 280-286.

1997 “LIRT’s Top Twenty for 1996″ Award, LIRT (Library Instruction
Round Table, ALA) News (June): 11. For: Composing Boolean Search
Statements: Self-Confidence, Concept Analysis, Search Logic, and
Errors. School Library Media Quarterly (Summer): 201-207.

1994 Top Twenty Award, LIRT (Library Instruction Round Table, ALA) for:
Bibliographic Instructional Design for Information Literacy: Integrating Affective and Cognitive Objectives. Research Strategies. 11(2)(Spring) pp.73-88.

Forthcoming Works

Nahl, Diane. 2006, in press. Domain Interaction Discourse Analysis: A Technique for Charting the Flow of Micro-Information Behavior. Journal of Documentation (Manuscript submitted September 13, 2005; revisions completed January 29, 2006).

Nahl, Diane and Dania Bilal, Eds. 2006. Information and Emotions: The Emergent Affective Paradigm in Information Behavior Research and Theory. (Medford, NJ: Information Today).

Nahl, Diane. 2006, in press. The Affective Revolution in Information Behavior Research and Theory. In Information and Emotions: The Emergent Affective Paradigm in Information Behavior Research and Theory. (Medford, NJ: Information Today).

Nahl, Diane. 2006, in press. The Positive Bias Effect in Information Behavior. In Information and Emotions: The Emergent Affective Paradigm in Information Behavior Research and Theory. (Medford, NJ: Information Today).

Selected Publications

Nahl, Diane. 2006. A Symbiotic Human-Machine Model for Tracking User Micro-Attributes. Skilled Human-Intelligent Agent Performance: Measurement, Application, and Symbiosis Symposium, HICSS-39 (Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences), January 4, Kauai, (Los Alamitos, CA: IEEE Computer Society Press). http://www.itl.nist.gov/iaui/vvrg/hicss39/

Nahl, Diane. 2005. Affective and Cognitive Information Behavior: Interaction Effects in Internet Use. Proceedings of the 68th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Information Science & Technology, October 28-November 2, Charlotte, NC, Medford, NJ: Information Today. http://www.asis.org/Conferences/AM05/program.html

Nahl, Diane. 2005. Affective Load Theory (ALT). In Karen E. Fisher, Sanda Erdelez, & Elizabeth F. McKechnie, (Eds.). Theories of Information Behavior. Medford, NJ: Information Today, pp. 39-43. http://books.infotoday.com/asist/theorofinbeh.shtml

Nahl, Diane. 2004. Measuring the Affective Information Environment of Web Searchers. Proceedings of the 67th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Information Science & Technology, November 12-17, Providence, RI, Medford, NJ: Information Today, pp. 191-197.

Nahl, Diane and Violet Harada. 2004. Taxonomy of Common Boolean, Semantic, Syntactic and Lexical Search Errors, Eds., Mary Chelton and Colleen Cool, Youth Information Seeking Behavior: Theories, Models, and Issues. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.

Nahl, Diane. 2003. The User-Centered Revolution: Complexity in Information Behavior. Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science Online. Second Edition, Revised and Expanded. New York: Marcel Dekker: pp. 3028-3042.
http://www.dekker.com/servlet/product/DOI/101081EELIS120008868

Nahl, Diane. 2001. Strategic Research Approaches for Reference Librarians. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall-Hunt.

Nahl, Diane. 2001. A Conceptual Framework for Defining Information Behavior. Studies in Multimedia Information Literacy Education (SIMILE). 1(2) (May).
http://www.utpjournals.com/jour.ihtml?lp=simile/issue2/nahl1.html

James, Leon and Diane Nahl. 2000. Aggressive Driving is Impaired Driving. Ontario Ministry of Transportation, Road User Safety Branch with Drivers.com, Online Conference on Agrressive Driving. October 16-23.

Nahl, Diane. 1998. Creating User-Centered Instructions for Novice End-Users. Reference Services Review. 27(3):280-286.

Nahl, Diane. 1998. Learning the Internet and the Structure of Information Behavior. Journal of the American Society for Information Science. 49(11): 1017-1023.

Nahl, Diane. 1998. Ethnography of Novices’ First Use of Web Search Engines: Affective Control in Cognitive Processing. Internet Reference Services Quarterly. 3(2): 51-72.

Nahl, Diane. 1997. Information Counseling Inventory of Affective and Cognitive Reactions while Learning the Internet. Internet Reference Services Quarterly. 2(2/3): 11-33. Reprinted in Martin, Lyn Elizabeth M., Ed. The Challenge of Internet Li teracy: The Instruction-Web Convergence. (New York: Haworth Press, 1997, pp. 11-33).

Nahl, Diane and Pervais Meer. 1997. User-centered Assessment of Two Web Browsers: Errors, Perceived Self-Efficacy, and Success. Proceedings of the 60th ASIS Annual Meeting, Vol.34 Washington, D.C., November 1-6, 1997: 89-97.

Nahl, Diane. 1996. Affective Monitoring of Internet Learners: Perceived Self-Efficacy and Success. Proceedings of the 59th ASIS Annual Meeting, Vol. 33 Baltimore, MD, October 20-25, 1996: 100-109.

Diane Nahl and Violet Harada. 1996. Composing Boolean Search Statement: Self-Confidence, Concept Analysis, Search Logic, and Errors.School Library Media Quarterly. 24(4): 201-207.

Nahl, Diane and Leon James. Achieving Focus, Engagement, and
Acceptance: Three Phases of Adapting to Internet Use. Electronic
Journal of Virtual Culture.
(February 26, 1996) 4(1),
http://www.monash.edu.au/journals/ejvc/ejvcv4n1.james

Diane Nahl and Carol Tenopir. 1996. Affective and Cognitive Searching Behavior of Novice End-Users of a Full Text Database. JASIS Journal of the American Society for Information Science. 47(4): 276-286.