Laura Ruby


 

Introduction to 3-Dimensional Composition

 Art 116

 

Syllabus
Supplies and Materials
Carved Enlargement
Oldenburg Analogies of Form
Mixed Media Paper Mache Fantastical Animal Sculpture
Campus Art Tour

Downtown Art Field Trip

Personal Furniture
Interactive Whirligig 

 

Fall 2010

SYLLABUS

ART 116 

INTRODUCTION TO 3-D COMPOSITION

Three-dimensional form visually interesting from every angle--this course will focus on the elements of form, the principles of design, and the fundamentals of spatial structure/organization in three-dimensional visual art forms. Emphasis will be placed on three-dimensional visualization and tactile exploration of forms, environments and ideas through a variety of approaches, tools, processes and materials.

The class will consist of discussions/demonstrations on particular concepts and/or projects. Students will work out ideas in their sketchbooks/journals.  Finished projects will be presented at class reviews. Daily informal critiques and discussions will be held on an on-going basis. Students will be responsible for all information given in class.

  • The primary objective of this course is: reading the three-dimensional world and especially the human constructed/created world.
  • This course asks: How can we sharpen our perceptual acuity? How do we understand the world through time and movement? How do we understand a created work in relation to our own human scale? How does a three-dimensional artwork grab our attention?  How does it engage not only our eyes, but also cause us to move physically through space and time to approach and interact with it from many points of view? What is the context for a created artwork? How does an artwork make meaning in three-dimensional space and in the temporal fourth-dimension of lived experience? What is its language/code and the power that that language might suggest?

Student Learning Outcomes for Art 116:

Upon successful completion of this course you will be able to:

1) Comprehend and successfully apply the visual elements of line, texture, color, volume, negative space and mass--and the principles of design of balance, rhythm, contrast and proportion;

2) Begin to understand and demonstrate the process of creative problem solving through the application of concepts, techniques and materials in 3-D artworks;

3) Begin to understand the basic properties and techniques associated with some of the various materials used in sculpture; and
demonstrate a general knowledge of modeling, carving, casting, and assembling methods;

4) Develop rudimentary abilities in identifying, critically analyzing and verbally articulating conceptual and compositional principles in three-dimensional artworks;

5) Begin to use the process of sculpting to express personal imagery and/or ideas; and

6) Demonstrate a general knowledge of historic and contemporary 3-dimensional arts.

If you feel that you need reasonable accommodations because of the impact of a disability, please speak with me privately to discuss your needs, and/or contact the KOKUA Program (956-7511 or kokua@hawaii.edu). We will be very happy to work with you and/or the KOKUA Program.

 

QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION:

1.  Why do I want to make art?

2.  How do I get ideas?

3.  What format is best for my idea?

4.  How are works of art organized?

5.  How will I know when my work is finished?

ATTENDANCE--this course requires full attendance. Visual concepts are often only understood after sharing, comparing, questioning, revising and synthesizing...as well as listening. A tardy or absent student diminishes the overall quality of the class. Three tardies will equal one unexcused absence. Three unexcused absences will immediately lower the final grade.

PLEASE TURN OFF ALL ELECTRONICS--CELLPHONES, BEEPERS AND PAGERS BEFORE ENTERING THE CLASSROOM. THE FIRST CELL PHONE INTERRUPTION WILL LOWER YOUR GRADE. YOU WILL NOT BE ASKED BACK TO THE CLASS SHOULD THIS OCCUR AGAIN. YOUR EDUCATION IS YOUR MOST IMPORTANT PRIORITY AT THIS TIME. NO I-PODS OR WALKMEN PLEASE. PLEASE ARRANGE YOUR WORK AND SOCIAL SCHEDULES AROUND YOUR EDUCATIONAL SCHEDULE.

GRADING CRITERIA--projects will be evaluated in terms of:

1.  Imagination, enthusiasm, and risk taking

2.  Clarity of concept, organization

3.  Timely participation (come to class, turn in work on time, and participate in discussions and critiques)

4.  Quality of execution (craftsmanship)

COURSE CONTENT

1. 10% Carved Enlargement

2. 10% Oldenburg paper

3. 20% Mixed Media Paper Mache Fantastical Animal Sculpture

4. 5% Campus Art Tour and typed Review

5. 5% Downtown Art Field Trip and typed Review

6. 25% Personal Furniture

7. 20% Interactive Whirligig

8. 5% Participation--attendance/punctuality   

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SUPPLIES AND MATERIALS

--materials reimbursement-- $30.00 (check payable to University of Hawai’i)

--combination lock

--bristol board or manila folder paper

--ruler

--Elmer's glue

--1/2 gallon paper milk carton
 

--covered plastic containers

--plastic bags

--masking tape

--x-acto knife and #11 blades

--inexpensive or old screwdriver

--old fettling knife or steak knife or any old carving tools if you have them

--WET/DRY SANDPAPER # 100, 200, 300, 400, 600

--assorted hunks of junk styrofoam

--1" x 2" wood

--old clothes or apron

--paper towels

--old newspapers

--scissors

--optional blow dryer

--optional latex gloves

--other materials to be announced

 

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Henry Moore in his studio


1)  CARVED ENLARGEMENT

Sculptor:  Henry Moore

Sculpture methods:  Modeling and carving (and some casting)
Carving out of the block using the subtractive method
Create a small plasticine maquette that is both asymmetrical and dynamic and
Carve a larger version of that model using any hand tools available

Time frame:  approximately 3 1/2 to 4 weeks

Criteria:

Is it fully 3-D?
Does it engage your eye and draw your eye around the artwork?
Does it have dynamic use of nagative and positive space?
Does it incorporate rhythmical qualities?
Has it left the block behind?
Does it exhibit softness?










2) OLDENBURG ANALOGIES OF FORM

Sculpltor: Claes Oldenburg

Sculpture method: Idea Formation and Visual Relationships of Form

MAQUETTE: a professional to-scale model for a public artwork

Time Frame: Approximately 2 weeks

 

2 or more shapes = form

example:

A.  Oldenburg analogy--5 images--include legends with names and numbers

B.                    "             "                      "                      

C.  Your own analogy                "                                  "

                        -2 or more shapes = form

                        -no vessels (can, bowl, cup, etc.)

D.        "                                              "                                  "

  • "   
  •                                           "                                        "

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

F. Your own monument located here in Hawai'i

--no Punchbowl)

1. Drawing--locate your monument in a specific location

-- use colored pencils or markers – 8 1/2" x 11"

2. Written and typed monument proposal

--(approximately 3/4 – 1 page)

a. Aesthetic points of interest

b. Cultural points of interest

--historical features, habits of the community/neighborhood

--geographical/environmental points of interest

c. Functional relationship to people

--interaction

--human scale

d. Ability to change

--movement, ability to have various positions

Time frame: Approximately 1 week

Criteria:

Does this project show in-depth relational thinking regarding visual forms?

Does it show sensitivity to site-based artworks and their relationships to viewer/participants?

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3) MIXED MEDIA PAPER MACHE FANTASTICAL ANIMAL SCULPTURE

Sculptors: of European Christian church gargoyles

Sculpture method: Assemblage, additive

Create twists and turns in the animal’s basic anatomy. The animal will stand in at least two positions. 

Form armature from styrofoam, chopsticks or strips of wood and Elmers glue or from wadded newspaper bound by masking tape. 

The skin will have a paper mache surface treatment (see Art 101 website (www.hawaii.edu/lruby) . 

The skin should have some relationship to the overall form.

Time frame: Approximately 2 ½ to 4 weeks

Criteria:

Is there good craftsmanship?

Is it visually engaging from all angles? Is is asymmetrical?

 

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6) PERSONAL FURNITURE

Sculptor: Scott Burton and others

Sculpture method: Assemblage

Using only 1” x 2” pieces of wood (and wooden dowels and joinery) create a self-supporting and aesthetically pleasing seat.

Time frame: Approximately 5 weeks

Criteria:

Functional--Is it self supporting? Is there good craftsmanship?

Aesthetic--Is it aesthetically pleasing? Is it asymmetrical?

 
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7) INTERACTIVE WHIRLIGIG

Visionary: Buckminster Fuller
assembled triangular structural elements
 
Sculptors: vernacular and outsider artists
 
Sculpture methods: idea formation, assemblage, kinetic, and other methods including sound and viewer participation

Materials: create a weatherproof special whirligig using found materials, thin aluminum plate and rivets, hammered textures, etc. 

Method of display and attachment to be noted  (a post to push into the soil -- or nuts and bolts for affixing to a mailbox or fence)

Time Frame: Approximately 3 weeks

Criteria: Does it engage people? 

Does it invite a sense of discovery? 

How does the whirligig look? 

Does it have visual dynamic qualities? 

Is it asymmetrical?

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(BICYCLE HELMET/EGG DROP VEHICLE) Optional

Visionary: Buckminster Fuller

Sculpture method: Assemblage—additive

(HELMET: Using only Elmers glue and stiff paper construct a bicycle helmet that can withstand a 5 mph impact.)

(VEHICLE: Using about 1 oz. of white glue, one box of toothpicks, and one piece of paper 12” x 12” create a vehicle that will protect a raw chicken egg (medium size in a fall of 20 feet).)

Time Frame: Approximately 2 ½ weeks

Criteria:

Functional--does it work? Are you successful?

Aesthetic--how does the helmet/vehicle look? Does it have visual dynamic qualities? Is it asymmetrical?
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(Egg Drop Vehicle)

(Bicycle Helmets)


(PERFORMANCE—SOUND PIECE) Optional

Video/sound sculptor: Bill Viola

Sculpture methods: idea formation, assemblage and other methods

Create a storyboard showing the artworks use of time and space and include sound notations.

Work out the project. It can be audio taped before the performance. Or it can be video tped before the performance. Or it can occur live in front of your audience. 30 seconds or longer.

Time frame: Approximately 1 ½ week

Criteria:

Compositionally strong use of time, space and sound.

Use of props or participants.)

(EXPERIENTIAL ARTWORKS) Optional

 
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Laura Ruby
Office 348
Phone (808) 956-5250
lruby@hawaii.edu
 
December 2010: in progress