Art 357



Sculpture – Small Scale   (DA)


Fabrication and casting of forms on a small scale such as jewelry. The development of related practices, concepts, and historical references. Repeatable one time. Pre: 116 or consent.

Laura Ruby









Small-Scale Sculptures are creations of 1) direct carving (“truth to materials”), 2) constructed sculpture (Picasso), 3) ready-made and found objects (Duchamp), 4) metal work and jewelry, and 5) small assemblages (Calder).


Three-dimensional form is visually interesting from every angle--this course will focus on the elements of form, the principles of design, and the fundamentals of spatial structure/organization in small-scale three-dimensional visual art forms. Emphasis will be placed on three-dimensional visualization and tactile exploration of forms, environments and ideas through a variety of approaches, tools, processes and materials.
 
The class will consist of discussions/demonstrations on particular concepts and/or projects. Students will work out ideas in their field books. Finished projects will be presented at class reviews. Daily informal critiques and discussions will be held on an on-going basis. Students will be responsible for all information given in class.

The primary objective of this course is: understanding and creating within the small human constructed/created three-dimensional world.

This course asks: How can we sharpen our perceptual acuity? How do we understand the world through time and movement? How do we understand a created work in relation to our own human scale? How does a small three-dimensional artwork grab our attention?  How does it engage not only our eyes, but also cause us to move physically through space and time to approach and interact with it from many points of view? What is the context for a created artwork? How does an artwork make meaning in three-dimensional space and in the temporal fourth-dimension of lived experience? What is its language/code and the power that that language might suggest?
   





Student Learning Outcomes for Art 357:
Upon successful completion of this course you will be able to:

1) Comprehend and successfully apply the visual elements of line, texture, color, volume, negative space and mass--and the principles of design of balance, rhythm, contrast and proportion;

2) Understand and demonstrate the process of creative problem solving through the application of concepts, techniques and materials in small-scale 3-D artworks;

3) Begin to understand the basic properties and techniques associated with some of the various materials used in small-sculpture; and demonstrate a general knowledge of modeling, carving, casting, and assembling methods;

4) Develop abilities in identifying, critically analyzing and verbally articulating conceptual and compositional principles in three-dimensional artworks;

5) Begin to use the process of sculpting to express personal imagery and/or ideas; and

6) Demonstrate a general knowledge of historic and contemporary small-scale 3-dimensional arts.




If you feel that you need reasonable accommodations because of the impact of a disability, please speak with me privately to discuss your needs, and/or contact the KOKUA Program (956-7511 or Kokua@hawaii.edu). We will be very happy to work with you and/or the KOKUA Program.



QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION:
1.  Why do I want to make art?
2.  How do I get ideas?
3.  What format is best for my idea?
4.  How are works of art organized?
5.  How will I know when my work is finished?


GRADING CRITERIA--projects will be evaluated in terms of:
1.  Imagination, enthusiasm, and risk taking
2.  Clarity of concept, organization
3.  Timely participation (come to class, turn in work on time, and participate in discussions and critiques)
4.  Quality of execution (craftsmanship)



 
COURSE REQUIREMENTS --

FIELD BOOK (with dates corresponding to each class meeting)
 -- 20% of the grade

CREATION OF ARTWORKS -- 70% of the grade

ARCHIVE -- 5% of the grade
This archive will be a collection of 20 contemporary sculpture images (presented in Powerpoint format).

ATTENDANCE AND PARTICIPATION -- 5% of the grade
This includes: attendance, punctuality, class interaction in great debates, emailing and office visit. This course requires full attendance. Visual concepts are often only understood after sharing, comparing, questioning, revising and synthesizing, as well as LISTENING. A tardy or absent student diminishes the overall quality of the class. Three tardies will equal one unexcused absence. Three unexcused absences will lower the final grade.


PLEASE TURN OFF ALL ELECTRONICS--CELLPHONES, BEEPERS AND PAGERS BEFORE ENTERING THE CLASSROOM. THE FIRST CELL PHONE INTERRUPTION WILL LOWER YOUR GRADE. YOU WILL NOT BE ASKED BACK TO THE CLASS SHOULD THIS OCCUR AGAIN. YOUR EDUCATION IS YOUR MOST IMPORTANT PRIORITY AT THIS TIME. NO I-PODS OR WALKMEN PLEASE. PLEASE ARRANGE YOUR WORK AND SOCIAL SCHEDULES AROUND YOUR EDUCATIONAL SCHEDULE.









Materials and Safety

Studio Practices


Tools





Surfaces

Hammering

Stamping
Chasing
Roll Printing
Engraving

Patinas
Etching
Polishing





Shaping

Piercing
Drawing Wire
Tubemaking
Bending
Forging
Repousse
Stretching and Sinking
Crimping
Raising













Joining

Soldering
Torches and Soldering Blocks
Flux
Soldering Methods
Flames and Pickles
Rivets
Tabs, etc.
Adhesives




Casting

Sand Casting
Los Wax Casting
Modeling Wax
Carving Wax
Nonwax Models
Sprues
Investing
Burnout
Steam Casting
Centrifugal Casting
Hollow Core Casting
Clay and Rubber Molds










Carving








Stones and Settings

and

Assembled Found Objects










Mechanisms

Buckles
Clasps
Rings
Chains
Hinges











Laura Ruby
lruby@hawaii.edu
www.hawaii.edu/lruby
(808) 956-5250


In progress: December 2010