Comments on: Students document disappearing languages http://www.hawaii.edu/malamalama/2010/10/documenting-disappearing-languages/ The magazine of the University of Hawai'i System Thu, 06 Sep 2012 21:11:28 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.1 By: laura ierago http://www.hawaii.edu/malamalama/2010/10/documenting-disappearing-languages/#comment-80648 Sat, 30 Oct 2010 05:25:26 +0000 http://www.hawaii.edu/malamalama/?p=6077#comment-80648 Good day! I a person from Sonsorol Island, an outer island of Palau. There are about 500 of us Sonsorolese in the entire world. Our language is different from the majority Palauan language. It is related to the outer islands of Yap and the some of the eastern Carolines (Chuuk, Pohnpei).

A group of us have begun compiling words of our language. We have been doing this on and off for over a year. We are looking for a linguist who can help us document our language in a useable manner.

We fear loss of our language. It is apparent that we are losing it and really fast. This is because most of us have moved to Koror, Palau away from our island, so we have learned Palauan and English to be understood and to understand. Many of our children nowadays first learn English.

If there is any way you can help us please contact me at my email.

Sincerely, laura

]]>
By: Dr. Jan Teagle Kapetas http://www.hawaii.edu/malamalama/2010/10/documenting-disappearing-languages/#comment-80093 Mon, 18 Oct 2010 01:36:56 +0000 http://www.hawaii.edu/malamalama/?p=6077#comment-80093 Good Morning!
I read with interest, this article on the documentation of and activities being instituted towards the maintenance of at risk Indigenous languages. Here in the Pilbara region of Western Australia, the language most spoken by Indigenous Australians is Yindjibarndi.

The Juluwarlu Group Aboriginal Corporation is a not-for-profit Yindjibarndi cultural organization dedicated to maintaining our culture and language – but although we can find funding for many other aspects of our cultural maintenance and community development work – we struggle desperately to do our language maintenance work because we cannot afford to house and pay a full-time linguist. (Currently we ‘borrow’ a linguist part-time from another organization) – but we would love to have someone on-board full-time as we publish books/ film documentaries and other language resources for our people.

Anyone out there with a passion – and Indigenous research & language maintenance interests is invited to contact us – see our website!

]]>