Award named in honor of criminology professor

March 13, 2012  |   |  1 Comment
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Meda Chesney-Lind headshot

Meda Chesney-Lind

Meda Chesney-Lind, professor of women’s studies at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa will receive the Meda Chesney-Lind Award for her scholarly achievement and activism in the intersection of gender of crime from the Western Society of Criminology in 2013. The national award is being named in her honor to recognize her service to the organization and contributions to feminist criminology. Chesney-Lind will accept the inaugural award at WSC’s 40th anniversary meeting in February 2013.

Chesney-Lind, a fellow of the American Society of Criminology, has been nationally recognized for her work on women and crime. She received the Bruce Smith Sr. Award from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences and the Herbert Block Award from the American Society of Criminology. She also received the University of Hawaiʻi Board of Regent’s Medal for Excellence in Research.

The author of eight books, Chesney-Lind has just finished two more titles on trends in girls’ violence—Beyond Bad Girls: Gender, Violence and Hype, written with Katherine Irwin, and Fighting for Girls, co-edited with Nikki Jones. Fighting for Girls won an award from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for “focusing America’s attention on the complex problems of the criminal and juvenile justice systems.”

In Hawaiʻi, she has worked with the Family Court, First Circuit, advising it on the recently formed girls court as well as helping to improve the situation of girls in detention with the recent Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative.

Read more about her.

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  1. Jackie Graessle says:

    I can think of no other person deserving of such an honor. Many years ago, she ignited a passion for social justice in me; not only by the concepts she taught, but by the examples she set. I believe my decision to become a social worker is largely because of what she exposed me to. I became involved in the criminal justice system because of her. I later mentored social work students who wanted to intern in the correctional system. I tried to teach them to have compassion the way Dr. Chesney-Lind taught me to have compassion. I am thrilled for Dr. Chesney-Lind.

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