Hawaii CC and Hilo educators honored by Native Hawaiian association

April 2, 2013  |   |  Comments
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Clockwise from left, Gail Makuakane-Lundin, Taupouri Tangaro and Kekuhi Kanae Kanahele KealiikanakaoleoHaililani named 2013 Educators of the Year by the Native Hawaiian Education Association.

Clockwise from left, Gail Makuakane-Lundin, Taupouri Tangaro and Kekuhi Kanae Kanahele KealiikanakaoleoHaililani named 2013 Educators of the Year by the Native Hawaiian Education Association.

Two Hawaiʻi Community College professors and a longtime University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo employee have been named 2013 Educators of the Year by the Native Hawaiian Education Association, one of the most prestigious awards in Hawaiian education.

Taupōuri Tangarō, an associate professor and the chairman of the humanities department at Hawaiʻi CC; Kekuhi Kanae Kanahele KealiʻikanakaʻoleoHaililani, assistant professor and coordinator at Hawaiʻi CC’s I Ola Haloa Hawaiʻi Life Styles Program; and Gail Makuakāne-Lundin, executive assistant to the chancellor at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, was honored at the Native Hawaiian Education Association’s 14th Annual Convention, March 21–22.

Hawaiʻi CC Chancellor Noreen Yamane said the University of Hawaiʻi system is fortunate to have such dedicated educators working at Hawaiʻi CC and UH Hilo. “Tangarō, Gail and Kekuhi have a deep understanding of Hawaiian culture and history, which is incredibly valuable for our students and our college community overall,” said Yamane.

More on the honorees

Kumu Hula Tangarō received his training from Hālau O Kekuhi, a traditional hula school known for the ʻaihaʻa style of hula—a low-postured, vigorous, bombastic style reflecting the creative forces of the volcano. He received his bachelor of arts from UH Hilo, his master of education from Heritage College and his PhD from Union Institute and University.

Makuakāne-Lundin has been with UH Hilo for 29 years and is considered a leader in Native Hawaiian student services on campus and within the UH System. She led the systemwide initiative that added Hawaiian ancestry to the UH common application in 2005. She holds a master of science degree in public health from UH Mānoa, a bachelor of arts degree in biology from UH Hilo and is a doctoral candidate at the University of Southern California Rossier School of Education.

Kumu Hula KealiʻikanakaʻoleoHaililani, under the direction of her mentors, has co-produced some of Hālau o Kekuhi’s most significant contributions to oral and ritual arts performances. She holds a bachelor of arts in Hawaiian studies from UH Hilo and a master of education from Heritage University. She will be pursuing a doctoral degree.

Read more about the winners in the Hawaiʻi CC news release.

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