School of Law is fifth least expensive among top law schools

June 4, 2014  |   |  1 Comment
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William S. Richardson School of Law students in class

William S. Richardson School of Law students in class

According to a new survey of the country’s top-ranked law schools by U.S. News & World Report, the William S. Richardson School of Law is ranked among the top five best bargains in the entire country, with respect of loans that students take out to finance their legal education.

Of the 10 most reasonably-priced law schools in the country, the School of Law is ranked in the top five. Also, the U.S. News short list also reported this week that, of those 2013 students who borrowed money for law school, Richardson graduates carry the 10th lowest level of debt.

The report found that the 2013 graduates who borrowed to attend Richardson carry an average debt load of $70,263—almost $40,000 lower than the average debt carried by all 2013 law school graduates across the country.

Average law school debt for 2013 graduates who borrow is $109,756, according to the U.S. News data. However, the average debt of the 10 lowest-priced schools for 2013 graduates who borrowed was $63,008.

Dean Avi Soifer said that the Richardson School of Law has long excelled at keeping costs low while providing an exceptional, personalized legal education for its students. Additionally, he pointed out that the Part-Time Evening Program enables students to continue working at day jobs while attending the School of Law.

Said Soifer, “Our founding mission was to provide the opportunity for an excellent legal education and training in leadership for those who otherwise might not have been able to attend law school. We are working hard to realize the dream shared by Chief Justice Richardson and his allies when they fought to start this Law School 40 years ago.”

Read the School of Law news release for more on the school’s recent honors.

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Category: Academic News

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  1. Anon Ymou says:

    Debt is lower for some law students in Hawaii due to their ability to live with family during the three years of law school.

    Those living off-campus need additional student loans to cover three years of rent. That puts the “$40,000 lower” right back on the table.

    The school is not so much a bargain — it’s simply unusual in the number of students who are able to live with relatives and still commute to school.

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