University of Hawaiʻi System News » Smithsonian http://www.hawaii.edu/news Thu, 18 Dec 2014 00:20:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 Unukupukupu to return to Smithsonian Folklife Festival http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2013/01/09/unukupukupu-to-return-to-smithsonian-folklife-festival/ http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2013/01/09/unukupukupu-to-return-to-smithsonian-folklife-festival/#comments Thu, 10 Jan 2013 03:01:57 +0000 http://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=12848
A group of hula dancers on stage

Unukupukupu performed at the Library of Congress during their trip to Washington, D.C. for the 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

Members of the Hawaiʻi Community College hula hālau Unukupukupu have been invited back to the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 2013 after opening the festival last year with a performance on the main stage that thrilled the international audience.

Taupōuri Tangarō and four other members of Unukupukupu will travel to Washington, D.C. this summer and take part in the upcoming 2013 Folklife Festival program, “One World, Many Voices: Endangered Languages and Cultural Heritage.”

As a preview to Hawaiʻi’s participation in the 2013 Folklife Festival, the Smithsonian produced a short documentary video in which Tangarō, a hula professor at Hawaiʻi CC, describes the connection between the Native Hawaiian language and hula.

“If there’s a hula dance, there’s words,” Tangarō says in the video. “We can’t dance without narrative. The language is how we communicate to our universe. People think hula is choreography. Hula is first a language that has a choreographical piece to it.”

View the video on the Smithsonian Folklife Festival website.

Second year of UH participation in Folklife Festival

Last year, the University of Hawaiʻi was among 20 public land-grant universities featured in the 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival program, “Campus and Community.” Dozens of faculty, staff, students and supporting community members affiliated with UH traveled to the festival and shared Native Hawaiian culture with the attendees.

The Smithsonian is funding Unukupukupuʻs trip this year, and Tangarō said it was a thrill to be invited back.

“It is a privilege to demonstrate the role hula plays in the reacquisition of Hawaiian language as well as the significant role language plays in hula,” Tangarō said. “Hula is mostly known throughout the world as the exotic dance of Hawaiʻi so it’s advantageous to step onto a national platform and speak to the other aspects of hula that are largely underrepresented if they are represented at all.”

— Article contributed by Hawaiʻi Community College External Relations Coordinator Thatcher Moats

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Smithsonian Folklife Festival photo gallery http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/13/smithsonian-folklife-festival-photo-gallery/ http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/13/smithsonian-folklife-festival-photo-gallery/#comments Fri, 13 Jul 2012 23:57:59 +0000 http://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=8283
<p>Summer Maunakea and Ulu Cashman pounding taro at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Summer Maunakea and Ulu Cashman pounding taro at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>University of Hawaii at Manoa Associate Professor Keawe Kaholokula, of the Department of Native Hawaiian Health, teaches visitors how to make awa at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

University of Hawaii at Manoa Associate Professor Keawe Kaholokula, of the Department of Native Hawaiian Health, teaches visitors how to make awa at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>Kala Baybayan explains the star compass at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Kala Baybayan explains the star compass at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>Lei making workshop at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Lei making workshop at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>The Tuahine Troupe on the big screen at The Kennedy Center, Washington, DC.</p>

Tuahine Troupe Performance

The Tuahine Troupe on the big screen at The Kennedy Center, Washington, DC.

<p>Lauhala weaving at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Lauhala weaving at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>Loi Assistant Kaulana Vares, of the University of Hawaii at Manoa's Ka Papa Loi O Kanewai, teaches youngsters to pound taro at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Loi Assistant Kaulana Vares, of the University of Hawaii at Manoa's Ka Papa Loi O Kanewai, teaches youngsters to pound taro at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>The Tuahine Troupe performs at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

The Tuahine Troupe performs at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>People from all over the world learn how to play the ukulele at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

People from all over the world learn how to play the ukulele at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>Hawaii Community College Instructor Noe Noe Wong-Wilson teaches lauhala weaving at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Hawaii Community College Instructor Noe Noe Wong-Wilson teaches lauhala weaving at the University of Hawaii exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>University of Hawaii Foundation Associate Vice President Alvin Katahara at the UH alumni exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

University of Hawaii Foundation Associate Vice President Alvin Katahara at the UH alumni exhibit at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>University of Hawaii delegates teach hei, a traditional Hawaiian string game, at the UH tent at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

University of Hawaii delegates teach hei, a traditional Hawaiian string game, at the UH tent at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>Lomi lomi demonstration at the University of Hawaii tent at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Lomi lomi demonstration at the University of Hawaii tent at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>Hawaii Community College's halau Unukupukupu talks to visitors at Aunty Noe's Porch t the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Hawaii Community College's halau Unukupukupu talks to visitors at Aunty Noe's Porch t the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>A hula workshop at the University of Hawaii tent at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

A hula workshop at the University of Hawaii tent at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>A hula workshop at the University of Hawaii tent at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

A hula workshop at the University of Hawaii tent at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>University of Hawaii delegates show visitors how to play a Hawaiian game of strategy at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

University of Hawaii delegates show visitors how to play a Hawaiian game of strategy at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>A hula workshop at the University of Hawaii tent at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

A hula workshop at the University of Hawaii tent at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>Windward Community College Instructor Aaron Sala gives a talk about Hawaiian music in Aunty Noe's porch at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Windward Community College Instructor Aaron Sala gives a talk about Hawaiian music in Aunty Noe's porch at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

<p>Navigator-in-Residence Kalepa Baybayan, from the University of Hawaii at Hilo's Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawaii, teaches visitors about non-instrument navigation at the University of Hawaii tent at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Navigator-in-Residence Kalepa Baybayan, from the University of Hawaii at Hilo's Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawaii, teaches visitors about non-instrument navigation at the University of Hawaii tent at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

The University of Hawaiʻi was among 20 public land-grant universities featured in the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington D.C. from June 27 to July 8, 2012.

See more on the University of Hawaiʻi’s Smithsonian experience.

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UH performance closes Smithsonian Folklife Festival http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/09/uh-peformance-closes-smithsonian-folklife-festival/ http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/09/uh-peformance-closes-smithsonian-folklife-festival/#comments Mon, 09 Jul 2012 22:51:56 +0000 http://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=8154

The University of Hawaiʻi wrapped up the 10 day Smithsonian Folklife Festival with an impromptu closing ceremony that came more than an hour ahead of schedule.

Weather forecasts predicting thundershowers and hail in the area forced the premature closure. That didn’t dampen the spirits of the UH contingent.

The festival was a triumph for the 80-member delegation from the University of Hawaiʻi System.

UH Mānoa’s Tuahine Troupe performed at The Kennedy Center and Hawaiʻi Community College’s Unukupukupu performed at the Library of Congress.

The delegation endured 100 degree temperatures to proudly share the Hawaiian culture with more than a million eager visitors from around the world.

The visitors learned about hula, taro pounding and farming, aquaponics, lomi lomi and Hawaiian health and healing, lauhala weaving and non-instrument navigation.

The visitors will never forget their experiences, but neither will their teachers.

A thunderstorm during the first week of the festival toppled the UH exhibit tent and wreaked havoc on the festival site but delegates were resilient. After a day of cleaning up and resurrecting tents the festival resumed, stronger than ever.

Participants say they will never forget the cultural exchanges, the people they met from all over the world, and the pride they felt in reaching and touching so many people through the Hawaiian culture.

The university’s participation in the Smithsonian Folklife Festival was made possible, in part by, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Hawaiʻi Convention Center and the University of Hawaiʻi Foundation.

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

The University of Hawaiʻi will be among 20 public land-grant universities to be featured in the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington D.C. from June 27 to July 8, 2012.

The festival celebrates the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Morrill Act, which paved the way for higher education for rural and working class Americans.

The University of Hawaiʻi exhibits will feature traditional Hawaiian health and healing practices, a mini taro patch, non-instrument navigation, medicinal herb and organic farming and much more. Hawaiʻi Community College’s halau Unukupukupu and the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Tuahine Troup will also perform.

See more on the University of Hawaiʻi’s Smithsonian experience.

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UH Manoa group performs at Kennedy Center in D.C. http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/06/uh-manoa-group-performs-at-kennedy-center-in-d-c/ http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/06/uh-manoa-group-performs-at-kennedy-center-in-d-c/#comments Sat, 07 Jul 2012 02:56:23 +0000 http://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=8137

The Tuahine Troupe from Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, performed at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington D.C. on Friday, July 6, 2012.

The performance on the Kennedy Center’s Millennium Stage was part of the 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

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Local community makes UH D.C. exhibit shine http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/06/local-community-makes-uh-d-c-exhibit-shine/ http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/06/local-community-makes-uh-d-c-exhibit-shine/#comments Fri, 06 Jul 2012 22:55:48 +0000 http://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=8085

The University of Hawaiʻi has welcomed hundreds of thousands of visitors to its exhibit tents during this year’s Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

Visitors have tried hula, lauhala weaving and taro pounding. They also learned about navigating by the stars, lomi lomi, aquaponics and taro patches.

The exhibit, however, has been about more than the University of Hawaiʻi. It has been about the community working together.

UH Mʻnoa alumnus Rick Barboza co-owns Hui Kū Maoli Ola, one of the largest Native Hawaiian plant nurseries in Hawaiʻi. The company transported the taro patch exhibit and aquaponics plants free of charge.

“We brought over nine boxes of plants—it was a six-foot-tall pallet of plants and there was a lot of plants that we were able to bring up,” said Barboza. “Now we got a loʻi. Now we got a nice aquaponics system that features some native plants and Polynesian introduced plants,” said Barboza.

Hui Kū Maoli Ola also transported decorative plants used for UH exhibits and presentations.

“It was good, it helped to spruce up the place and really provide a sense of place for all the Hawaiians that are here,” said Barboza.

Maʻo Farms brought some of its young people to the Folklife Festival to showcase its Farmwork to Higher Education Program, which allows young people to work part-time on the farm in exchange for a monthly stipend and a scholarship to Leeward Community College.

Derrick Kiyabu of Maʻo Farms says there challenges and opportunities in Waiʻanae. “What we want to do is increase and equalize access to higher education out there.”

And it’s working. The youngsters from Maʻo Farms are troopers and handling the summer heat well as they proudly share their knowledge of agriculture with more than a million visitors at the Folklife Festival.

Kiyabu says he brought the five young people to D.C. to “show people what we’re about.” He also wanted them to “get out of Hawaiʻi and see that people all across the nation are interested in what we are doing.”

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

The University of Hawaiʻi will be among 20 public land-grant universities to be featured in the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington D.C. from June 27 to July 8, 2012.

The festival celebrates the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Morrill Act, which paved the way for higher education for rural and working class Americans.

The University of Hawaiʻi exhibits will feature traditional Hawaiian health and healing practices, a mini taro patch, non-instrument navigation, medicinal herb and organic farming and much more. Hawaiʻi Community College’s halau Unukupukupu and the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Tuahine Troup will also perform.

See more on the University of Hawaiʻi’s Smithsonian experience.

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UH Smithsonian presence promotes Hawaii travel http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/05/uh-smithsonian-presence-promotes-hawaii-travel/ http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/05/uh-smithsonian-presence-promotes-hawaii-travel/#comments Fri, 06 Jul 2012 00:16:06 +0000 http://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=8019

The fourth of July brought crowds of people to the University of Hawaiʻi exhibits at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Wall to wall people enjoyed the Hawaiian culture and many say their interest in visiting the islands has been renewed for many different reasons.

“I like the down to earth culture and respect they have for the earth and crafts,” said exhibit visitor John Sackett. “It ties in with the earth and everything they create from it.”

“I saw everybody in a circle as a community weaving bracelets and I was attracted to that, I wanted to be part of that. As soon as I asked to be a part of it, they were wanting me to come in,” said exhibit visitor Meaghan Tine. “That was special. I liked that a lot.”

Kurt Dewhurst, campus and community curator of the Smithsonian Institution said the University of Hawaiʻi’s exhibits are not only promoting the university as the leading indigenous serving institution but also serves as an authentic marketing vehicle.

“The Hawaiian program is clearly one of the most popular programs and most interesting because of the depths of the presentations and the great aloha spirit of all the participants,” said Dewhurst.

Dewhurst said he’s certain that Hawaiʻi will see a boost in tourism because of the university’s participation in the Folklife Festival, which sees more than a million visitors annually.

“We know from visitor studies and also follow up research that travel and tourism offices did see a real bump,” Dewhurst said. “People say that the first time they saw that was at the festival and they always wanted to make a trip.”

Visitors are getting hands-on experience— weaving lauhala bracelets, pounding taro and learning the hula and how to play the ukulele.

These moments are priceless for these visitors who are experiencing a piece of Hawaiʻi without getting on a plane.

“I think what’s nice about the festival is you get beyond the kind of surface level of the story that people see through marketing and they actually meet Hawaiian people,” Dewhurst said. “To meet people and share their traditions in such honest and genuine ways is a very powerful, teachable moment,” Dewhurst said.

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

The University of Hawaiʻi will be among 20 public land-grant universities to be featured in the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington D.C. from June 27 to July 8, 2012.

The festival celebrates the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Morrill Act, which paved the way for higher education for rural and working class Americans.

The University of Hawaiʻi exhibits will feature traditional Hawaiian health and healing practices, a mini taro patch, non-instrument navigation, medicinal herb and organic farming and much more. Hawaiʻi Community College’s halau Unukupukupu and the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Tuahine Troup will also perform.

See more on the University of Hawaiʻi’s Smithsonian experience.

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UH shares Hawaiian culture in D.C. http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/03/uh-shares-hawaiian-culture-in-d-c/ http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/03/uh-shares-hawaiian-culture-in-d-c/#comments Tue, 03 Jul 2012 23:22:44 +0000 http://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=7967

The University of Hawaiʻi contingent is having a far-reaching effect at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Visitors from Europe, South Africa and around the globe are experiencing Hawaiian crafts—from feather lei making to lauhala weaving. They’re learning about woodcarving and makahiki games.

The 1.5 million people coming through the 10-day festival are also pounding taro and making poi. They’re learning about Hawaiian health and healing through lomi lomi or Hawaiian massage.

Members of hula hālau Unukupukupu are holding hula workshops to share their knowledge of the traditional dance.

Hawaiʻi Community College Professor Trina Nahm-Mijo said she is the oldest hālau member performing at the festival, and this experience was on her bucket list.

“I’m having the time of my life performing for hundreds of people and teaching people from around the world about our traditional dances and the Hawaiian culture,” Nahm-Mijo said.

Hālau members are also busy teaching visitors how to make a Hawaiian musical instrument called ʻūkēkē out of balsam wood and fishing wire.

Teenagers were especially interested in making an instrument of their own.

“It makes a very soft sound. And in Hawaiʻi, if somebody comes really close to you to hear that soft sound, it’s really kind of intimate. So that’s why they consider it a love call,” said ʻūkēkē workshop instructor Alohilani Adachi-Jose, of Hawaiʻi Community College in Hilo.

Washington, D.C. resident Stephon Vandergrift, 15, said it was fairly simple to make the instrument and play it.

“It’s not hard, It’s just movement of the hands. They say it helps you get women Hawaiʻi,” said Vandergrift.

Vandergrift was overwhelmed by the attention from his ʻūkēkē instructors and joined them in an impromptu song that attracted a crowd. But the shy 15-year-old took in all the attention… and the Hawaiian culture.

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

The University of Hawaiʻi will be among 20 public land-grant universities to be featured in the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington D.C. from June 27 to July 8, 2012.

The festival celebrates the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Morrill Act, which paved the way for higher education for rural and working class Americans.

The University of Hawaiʻi exhibits will feature traditional Hawaiian health and healing practices, a mini taro patch, non-instrument navigation, medicinal herb and organic farming and much more. Hawaiʻi Community College’s halau Unukupukupu and the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Tuahine Troup will also perform.

See more on the University of Hawaiʻi’s Smithsonian experience.

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Stormy Saturday, perfect Sunday for UH in D.C. http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/02/stormy-saturday-perfect-sunday-for-uh-in-d-c/ http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/07/02/stormy-saturday-perfect-sunday-for-uh-in-d-c/#comments Mon, 02 Jul 2012 23:20:57 +0000 http://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=7912

The resilient University of Hawaiʻi contingent worked together Sunday morning, July 1 to pick up the pieces and prepare for the re-opening of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

The Smithsonian Institution shut down the festival on Saturday, June 30 after a severe thunderstorm toppled the UH exhibit tent.

“We have a good bunch of people and the camaraderie is real positive, so we all worked together and we can get things done pretty fast,” said UH College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources Extension Agent Glenn Teves.

“Everybody’s going around making sure that everybody’s okay. People have been showing us a lot of aloha and making sure that we’re all right,” said Rick Barboza, UH alumnus and owner of plant nursery Hui Kū Maoli Ola.

UH was lucky—there wasn’t any damage to equipment and exhibits under the tent and only minor damage to the thatched hut and aquaponics system.

Elsewhere, exhibits were flattened. Washington and Oregon State found their tents were gone with the wind and their exhibits scattered across the National Mall.

Tent contractors worked through Saturday, and by Sunday the fallen tents were resurrected and it was business as usual.

“We set up a washing station and we had to scrub every surface that we had. Some of them were ripped, some of them have chunks out of them, but we reassembled and we were actually up and running on time this morning,” said Kathy Barnard, Washington State University.

Crowds were thick as they visited the UH exhibits to learned about makahiki games, woodcarving, Native Hawaiian plants and hula.

A major storm was a minor setback for 20 public land-grant universities proudly showcasing their cultures and specialties once again.

“I think the whole community pulled together and it’s a beautiful day and there’s a great vibe going on and a lot of people coming through,” Barnard said.

<p>The University of Hawaii contingent worked together on July 1 to pick up the pieces and prepare for the re-opening of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival after a severe thunderstorm shut down the festival on June 30.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival storm clean-up

The University of Hawaii contingent worked together on July 1 to pick up the pieces and prepare for the re-opening of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival after a severe thunderstorm shut down the festival on June 30.

<p>The University of Hawaii contingent worked together on July 1 to pick up the pieces and prepare for the re-opening of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival after a severe thunderstorm shut down the festival on June 30.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival storm clean-up

The University of Hawaii contingent worked together on July 1 to pick up the pieces and prepare for the re-opening of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival after a severe thunderstorm shut down the festival on June 30.

<p>The University of Hawaii contingent worked together on July 1 to pick up the pieces and prepare for the re-opening of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival after a severe thunderstorm shut down the festival on June 30.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival storm clean-up

The University of Hawaii contingent worked together on July 1 to pick up the pieces and prepare for the re-opening of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival after a severe thunderstorm shut down the festival on June 30.

<p>The University of Hawaii contingent worked together on July 1 to pick up the pieces and prepare for the re-opening of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival after a severe thunderstorm shut down the festival on June 30.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival storm clean-up

The University of Hawaii contingent worked together on July 1 to pick up the pieces and prepare for the re-opening of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival after a severe thunderstorm shut down the festival on June 30.

<p>The University of Hawaii contingent worked together on July 1 to pick up the pieces and prepare for the re-opening of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival after a severe thunderstorm shut down the festival on June 30.</p>

Smithsonian Folklife Festival storm clean-up

The University of Hawaii contingent worked together on July 1 to pick up the pieces and prepare for the re-opening of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival after a severe thunderstorm shut down the festival on June 30.

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

The University of Hawaiʻi will be among 20 public land-grant universities to be featured in the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington D.C. from June 27 to July 8, 2012.

The festival celebrates the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Morrill Act, which paved the way for higher education for rural and working class Americans.

The University of Hawaiʻi exhibits will feature traditional Hawaiian health and healing practices, a mini taro patch, non-instrument navigation, medicinal herb and organic farming and much more. Hawaiʻi Community College’s halau Unukupukupu and the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Tuahine Troup will also perform.

See more on the University of Hawaiʻi’s Smithsonian experience.

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Cultural exchange in D.C. between UH and New Mexico University http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/06/29/cultural-exchange-in-dc-between-uh-and-new-mexico-university/ http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/06/29/cultural-exchange-in-dc-between-uh-and-new-mexico-university/#comments Sat, 30 Jun 2012 02:39:42 +0000 http://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=7901

Despite a weather advisory and temperatures hovering between 102 and 105 degrees on Friday, the Smithsonian Folklife Festival went on as scheduled.

University of Hawaiʻi faculty member and author Maya Soetoro-Ng braved the heat to visit colleagues and UH exhibits on The National Mall where she said more than a million visitors will learn about the importance of the preservation of tradition and the power of harnessing indigenous culture.

“I also think it’s terrific that the university is having this opportunity to share and collaborate with other institutions and to have conversations of import and I think that the connections that are being forged here will probably be lasting,” Soetoro-Ng said.

University of Hawaiʻi delegates are having many opportunities to exchange cultural experiences with other public land-grant universities and colleges that are being featured in the festival.

UH students took part in a healing ritual at the University of New Mexico exhibit where traditional healers Tonita Gonzales and Rita Navarrete Perez led the group in asking for health, wisdom, illumination of heart, strength and spirit.

UH students and other participants held drums and bells and other instruments and rattled them during the ritual.

UH health and healing experts received healing treatments from New Mexico’s healers, who in turn received lomi lomi treatments from UH experts.

New Mexico’s healers presented, Keola Chan of UH Mānoa John A. Burns School of Medicine’s Department of Native Hawaiian Health, with a ceremonial headband and sash that are said to protect the healer’s energy.

“To me, it was about reconnecting as a people, bonding once again those relationships that we traditionally had when our ancestors used to sail,” said Chan.

In turn, Chan offered Navarrete Perez traditional Hawaiian ʻawa, which she accepted with gratitude.

“How important for us it is to share our sacred medicine from your beautiful country. And I feel the responsibility to share this experience to the people that come close to me in my life,” said Navarrete Perez, a traditional healer working with the University of New Mexico exhibit.

Experiences like this is what the festival is all about.

“Hopefully, the relationships, the two way flows will lead to other interesting projects of culture awareness and sharing and collaboration in the future,” Soetoro-Ng said.

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

The University of Hawaiʻi will be among 20 public land-grant universities to be featured in the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington D.C. from June 27 to July 8, 2012.

The festival celebrates the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Morrill Act, which paved the way for higher education for rural and working class Americans.

The University of Hawaiʻi exhibits will feature traditional Hawaiian health and healing practices, a mini taro patch, non-instrument navigation, medicinal herb and organic farming and much more. Hawaiʻi Community College’s halau Unukupukupu and the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Tuahine Troup will also perform.

See more on the University of Hawaiʻi’s Smithsonian experience.

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Hawaii congressional team honors UH delegation http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/06/28/hawaii-congressional-team-honors-uh-delegation/ http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2012/06/28/hawaii-congressional-team-honors-uh-delegation/#comments Fri, 29 Jun 2012 07:00:19 +0000 http://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=7831

The University of Hawaiʻi has a huge presence at this year’s Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C., where students, faculty, staff and a supporting community are sharing their knowledge of agriculture, Hawaiian health and healing, aquaponics and other specialties with more than a million visitors from around the world.

That hasn’t escaped Hawaiʻi’s congressional delegation, which, along with Governor Neil Abercrombie, hosted a mahalo reception for festival participants in the nation’s capitol on June 28.

UH hula hālau chanted and danced, and Senator Daniel Akaka’s rendition of the Hawaiian Lullaby received resounding applause.

“I’m so proud to be amongst you here from Hawaiʻi because you’re just one of 20 universities in this country that was invited to be part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival,” Akaka said.

Senior Senator Daniel Inouye expressed pride and support for the university’s work in reaching up to 1.5 million people on The National Mall.

“The Hawaiʻi delegation is extremely proud of the work you’re doing and we’d like to welcome the 80 UH students and faculty members who have come here to show the rest of the world and the rest of the nation that we in Hawaiʻi are now number one,” Inouye said.

“People on the mall coming by and they see what Hawaiʻi is, it is the only way we are going to get everyone to understand how special a place Hawaiʻi is, how wonderful aloha is and what it all means,” said U.S. Representative Colleen Hanabusa.

Congressional leaders say a world stage like the Smithsonian Folklife Festival can only help boost Hawaiʻi’s tourism industry, spark and increase interest in continuing research in specialties like aquaponics, and raise the potential for millions of dollars in research grants.

“There are a lot of people who are very interested in sustainability issues in terms of food and I think this is a revelation to them that there was a culture, that they protected the ʻaina,” said U.S. Representative Mazie Hirono.

“I don’t know that there’s ever been a time when I’ve been prouder of the university and more conscious of the very special role that the University of Hawaiʻi plays here in the United States today,” said UH President M.R.C. Greenwood.

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

The University of Hawaiʻi will be among 20 public land-grant universities to be featured in the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington D.C. from June 27 to July 8, 2012.

The festival celebrates the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Morrill Act, which paved the way for higher education for rural and working class Americans.

The University of Hawaiʻi exhibits will feature traditional Hawaiian health and healing practices, a mini taro patch, non-instrument navigation, medicinal herb and organic farming and much more. Hawaiʻi Community College’s halau Unukupukupu and the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Tuahine Troup will also perform.

See more on the University of Hawaiʻi’s Smithsonian experience.

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