News@UH

University of Hawaii System newsletter

The Value of Hawai’i Celebrates with Book Launch

Posted on | August 13, 2010 | 1 Comment

The Value of Hawai’i bookcover

The Value of Hawaiʻi: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future, a new book edited by Mānoa Professors Craig Howes and Jonathan Kay Kamakawiwoʻole Osorio explores that topic in a collection of 29 essays ranging from government to tourism, transportation to homelessness, agriculture, the arts, Hawaiian sovereignty and more.

At a time when new leaders will be elected, and new solutions need to be found, the contributors to The Value of Hawaiʻi outline the causes of the current state and offer points of departure for a Hawaiʻi-wide debate on its future. The contributors share a belief that taking stock of where Hawaiʻi is right now, what needs to change, and what needs to be remembered is a challenge that everyone must meet.

Celebrate the book’s official launch party on Sun., Aug. 22, 3 p.m. at Native Books in Ward Warehouse.

The editors and some contributors will be on hand. Many of the book’s contributing authors are from the University of Hawaiʻi community, including: Carlos Andrade, Chad Blair, Susan M. Chandler, Meda Chesney-Lind, Marilyn Cristofori, Kathy E. Ferguson, Chip Fletcher, Susan Hippensteele, Karl Kim, Sumner La Croix, Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie, Mari Matsuda, Davianna Pōmaikaʻi McGregor, Neal Milner, Deane Neubauer, John P. Rosa, D. Kapuaʻala Sproat, Ramsay Remigius Mahealani Taum and Phyllis Turnbull.

Increase public discussion on the value of Hawaiʻi and enjoy live music by Osorio.

For more information, please visit The Value of Hawaiʻi website, the Facebook event page or call (808)956-3774.

Also be on the lookout for upcoming, free public discussions centered around key themes in the book. Full schedule of events is on the book website or get word as they happen via @valuehawaii on Twitter.

All events co-sponsored by the The Center for Biographical Research and Hawai’i Council for the Humanities.

The Value of Hawaiʻi: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future is available at the UH Press website.

Comments