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UH Honors Excellence in Teaching

Posted on | September 16, 2011 | Comments Off

15 headshots

First row, from left, Abby Collier, Ann Emmsley, Gene Harada, Nancy Heu. Second row, from left, Yukio Kataoka, Chae Ho Lee, Roberta Martel, John Melish. Third row, from left, Joy Nagaue, Kirstin Pauka, Roberto Pelayo, Stephen Taylor. Fourth row, from left, Garyn Tsuru, Jenifer Winter, Christine Yano.

The Regents’ Medal for Excellence in Teaching honorees are Abby Collier, Ann Emmsley, Gene Harada, Nancy Heu, Yukio Kataoka, Chae Ho Lee, Roberta Martel, John Melish, Joy Nagaue, Kirstin Pauka, Roberto Pelayo, Stephen Taylor, Garyn Tsuru, Jenifer Winter and Christine Yano.

Abby Collier is a Mānoa assistant professor in the John A. Burns School of Medicine. She is a dynamic and charismatic communicator who possesses a gift for making complex and abstract subjects accessible. Read more

Ann Emmsley is a Maui professor of agriculture. She has been described as funny, creative and smart and passes her love of plants to her students. Read more

Gene Harada is a Hawaiʻi professor of carpentry. His students describe him as “a high caliber, dedicated teacher that is determined to do his best to assist his students to compete in the job market.” Read more

Nancy Heu is a professor and head librarian at Windward. From her expertise at the reference desk to her successful development of library curriculum, she is a respected educator and leader. Read more

Yukio Kataoka is an associate professor of Japanese at Kapiʻolani. His passion for teaching lies in helping students reach the next step toward their success and his dedication makes him a valuable asset to the college. Read more

Chae Ho Lee is a Mānoa assistant professor of art. His intuitive and rigorous teaching methods, his spirited energy and his passion for teaching in the graphic design program inspires his students. Read more

Roberta “Bobbie” Martel is an instructor in social sciences at Leeward. She has worked tirelessly and has reached out to the community with every ounce of her heart and soul to inspire a new generation of future teachers. Read more

John Melish is a professor of medicine at Mānoa. As a physician and as a teacher, he has exhibited an extraordinary level of subject mastery, scholarship, teaching effectiveness and personal values. Read more

Joy Nagaue is an associate professor in fashion technology at Honolulu. She strives to motivate her students to believe in themselves, while bringing out their originality and creativity. Read more

Kirstin Pauka is a professor of theatre at Mānoa. She brings her academic and artistic skills and experiences into the classroom to create an environment in which students can actually take real and meaningful part. Read more

Roberto Pelayo is an assistant professor of mathematics at Hilo. He is genuinely interested in his students’ academic career and is an outstanding resource and teacher. Read more

Stephen Taylor is an instructor in physical science at Kauaʻi. His extreme enthusiasm for the field helps students shed negative stereotypes about science to let evidence be their guide. Read more

Garyn Tsuru is an assistant professor of psychology at West Oʻahu. He launched the Psychotherapy Process and Treatment Outcome Lab, which provides opportunities for students to expand their education beyond traditional classroom settings. Read more

Jenifer Winter is an assistant professor in communications at Mānoa. She is recognized for her subject mastery, teaching effectiveness, pedagogical values and an uncompromising standard of excellence. Read more

Christine Yano is a professor of anthropology at Mānoa. A student says that Yano is “a person who not only opens the doors to a world of knowledge, but instills the desire to stay, to thrive and to share that world with others.” Read more

They will be recognized along with other UH award recipients at the annual Convocation ceremony to be held Tues., Sept. 27, 10 a.m. at Mānoa’s Kennedy Theatre. The ceremony is open to the public at no charge, and no reservations are needed.

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