University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Academic Support Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kauai Community College
Program: Academic Support Services

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The last comprehensive review for this program can be viewed at:
http://info.kauai.hawaii.edu/admin/prapru.htm#pr

Program Description

Library

As one of the learning support service units at Kauai Community College (KCC), the library provides services to its students and faculty within the Learning Resource Center. The library also supports community college distance students and University Center distance students (upper division and graduate students).  The library staff consists of four librarians and one library assistant.  Circulation, reference, and instructional services are the primary public services offered by the library. 

Along with access to a book collection of 61,894 volumes, the library also provides intrasystem loan (ISL) from the entire University of Hawaii Library System. There are in excess of four million volumes available through this loan system.  The library is currently subscribing to Ebrary, an electronic book service with access to 78,662 titles, and Ebsco which provides access to an additional 19,777 electronic book titles.  The library also subscribes to several full-text electronic databases for journals and magazines (13,522 titles). These are readily accessible by students from any remote location.   Links to these databases are prominently displayed on the library’s web page. 

Library Program Mission

The library provides an intellectually stimulating environment for the college community by providing a variety of resources and services that promote development of critical thinking and information literacy skills.

Computer Services

Computer Services’ primary function is to support the campus technology infrastructure by:

1.      Installing, troubleshooting and repairing computers and peripherals.

2.      Managing the campus Local Area Networks (LAN), as well as working with ITS Manoa to support our Wide Area Network (WAN).

3.      Managing campus servers, wired and wireless LAN devices

4.      Installing and maintaining campus computer labs *

5.       Installing and configuring operating system and application software for all administration, faculty, staff and lab computers* 

6.      Providing Help Desk support to campus users

7.      Providing intranet services

* Electronics, Carpentry, and Hawaiian Studies labs maintain their own labs with network access provided by  computer services.

The computer services staff consists of 4 IT Specialists, and one Computer Operator position. The Computer Operator is dedicated to the Testing Center leaving four IT Specialists to cover the needs of the campus.

The college hasabout 650 computers on campus.  Currently, the biggest change in college’s computing is in the number of notebooks, tablets and mobile devices that are being used by students, faculty and staff. The wireless network must also support a larger variety of devices brought on campus by students, faculty and staff. Appendix A contains an historical timeline of computer services since 1981. The following is a brief sketch of the current configurations and computers deployed on the campus.

 Minimum Desktop standard:

Our base configuration is Windows 7,  22” LCD LED backlit, MS Office 2007, Internet Explorer, FireFox., Chrome

Network status: At this point we have been on schedule with our network connectivity goals.  Our wireless system services 150+ concurrent users daily.  We have 50 access points managed by a controller.

Server status: The majority of our servers are Windows 2008 followed by Linux and Windows 2003. All but two of our servers are virtualized.  Since our last program review, we have gone through a cycle of server growth.

LAB standard: Windows 7, 2Gb RAM.

Mission Alignment

Kauai Community College Mission Statement:  Kaua‘i Community College provides open access education and training in an ethical and innovative student-centered and community-focused environment, nurturing life-long learners who appreciate diversity and lead responsible and fulfilling lives.

Computer Services Mission Statement: The Kaua'i Community College Computer Services department evaluates, implements, manages, and maintains quality, cost-effective network and computer technology resources to enrich the learning experience of our students, to augment academics and teaching, to support business and management operations, and to enhance the campus environment.

The CS department will strive to improve communication with constituents to get the best input to purchase and deploy learning technology and other technology that supports student needs.  Our support will in turn support the development of “life-long learners who think critically, appreciate diversity, and lead successful, independent, socially responsible, and personally fulfilling lives.”

Tutoring

Tutoring services is located in the new Learning Commons. Its primary function is to provide tutoring to KCC students on an appointment and a walk-in basis. Tutoring in mainly done by peer tutors. Tutoring has a collection of reference materials, mostly books, for student and tutor reference to be used in house. There is also a study room which is used for both group tutoring and quiet study. There are four computers and one printer for student use. In addition to tutoring, Tutoring provides study skills workshops, computer workshops, and the Brush-up program for writing and math.

Program Mission Statement: To help empower students to become efficient, confident, and independent learners and develop requisite skills they need to succeed in obtaining their academic, career, and personal goals, thus enabling them to lead self-directed and productive lives now and in the 21st century.

Testing

Kauai Community College’s Testing Center supports student and community success by providing academic and professional examination facilities both internally to faculty, staff, and students and externally to the Kauai community. The Testing Center is committed to maintaining the highest compliance with professional testing standards and practices, safeguarding confidentiality of records and exams, and creating an optimal testing environment.  The TC is staffed by one person with an additional 0.15 FTE of regular help from the University Center, and with support from Media Services in handling receipt and return of UH Distance Learning exams. We also work with Student Counseling & Advising in administering placement tests such that they handle the scheduling and paperwork for students taking COMPASS.  The Center offers 39.75 hours per week for regular testing which includes two evenings until 7:00 PM during the Fall and Spring semesters. Off-duty hours allow for daily administrative and other duties, and a lunch break. As a one-person office, proctoring by appointment allows staff to work on other assigned duties and remain an active part of the Kauai CC community. Additional TC information and an availability calendar are on the TC's web page www.tinyurl.com/kcctest.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Academic Support Services Program Health:
Not Yet Applied
Student and Faculty Information Program Year  
09-10 10-11 11-12
1 Annual Unduplicated Student Headcount     1,718  
2 Annual FTE Faculty     71
2a Annual FTE Staff     85
3 Annual FTE Student     780

Library Overall Health Call: Healthy
Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
4 Number of informational and reference questions per student and faculty FTE     10.7 Healthy
5 Number of students attending presentations sessions per student FTE     1.1
6 Number of circulations, electronic books used, full-text journal articles downloaded per student and faculty FTE     13.9
7 Number of web accessible computers per student FTE     0.5
Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
8 Number of informational and reference questions answered per FTE librarian     2,270.8 Healthy
9 Number of book volumes per student FTE     205.6
10 Total materials expenditures per student FTE     $52
11 Total library expenditures per student and faculty FTE     $565
Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
12 Common Student Learning Outcome: The student will evaluate information and its sources critically     0 Healthy
13 Student and faculty satisfaction measurements using common survey questions     4.3

Tutoring Services Overall Health Call: Healthy
Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
14 Number of students tutored per student FTE     0.4 Healthy
15 Number of students who placed in Dev/Ed through COMPASS per student FTE     0.5
Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
16 Tutor contact hours per tutor paid hours     0.31 Healthy
17 Student contact hours per tutor paid hours     0.38
18 Number of sessions per tutor paid hours     0.31
19 Tutoring Budget per student contact hours     $31
Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
20 Common Student Learning Outcome: Students who receive tutoring will pass their tutored course.     0 Healthy
Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) Survey Year
  2010 2012
21 4.h. Tutored or taught other students (paid or voluntary)
  Very Often     2.90
  Often     11.00
  Sometimes     22.10
  Never     63.90
22 13.d. Peer or other tutoring (frequency, satisfaction, importance)
  Frequencey     1.61
  Satisfaction     2.30
  Importance     2.39
23 13.e. Skill labs (writing, math, etc.) (frequency, satisfaction, importance)
  Frequencey     1.78
  Satisfaction     2.30
  Importance     2.40

Testing Services Overall Health Call: Healthy
Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
24 Number of placement tests administered per year per student FTE     1.5 Healthy
25 Number of Distance Learning tests administered per year per student FTE     0.9
26 Local campus tests proctored per year per student FTE     2.7
Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
27 Testing seats per student FTE     0.0 Healthy
28 Testing seats per total number of tests     0.0
29 Total number of tests per Testing Budget     $0
Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
30 Satisfaction measurements using common survey questions     5 Healthy

Technology Resources Overall Health Call: Healthy
Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
31 Number of online courses per year per total number of courses (live and online)     3% Healthy
32 Number of student, faculty and staff computers per IT desktop support staff     162.5
33 Number of technology workshops for faculty per faculty FTE     0.3
34 Number of technology workshops for staff per staff FTE     0.2
35 Number of technology workshops for students per student FTE     0.0
Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
36 Average response time for Help Desk calls     1 Healthy
37 Average processing time for work orders     1
38 Total number of computers per Computer Services Budget     $0
Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
Common survey questions Healthy
39 1) I am satisfied with the customer service of the Help Desk/computer services staff.     4
40 2) I am satisfied with the response time of the Help Desk/computer services staff.     4
41 3) The computers on campus meet my needs.     4
42 4) I am satisfied with the quality of work of the instructional design faculty and staff.     4
Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) Survey Year
  2010 2012
43 4.j. Used the Internet or instant messaging to work on an assignment
  Very Often     44.80
  Often     28.80
  Sometimes     19.70
  Never     6.60
44 9.g. Using computers in academic work
  Very Much     53.80
  Quite a Bit     28.00
  Some     16.20
  Very Little     2.00
45 12.g. Using computing and information technology
  Very Much     34.30
  Quite a Bit     38.40
  Some     18.70
  Very Little     8.70
46 13.h. Computer lab
  Frequency     2.06
  Satisfaction     2.58
  Importance     2.61

Last Updated: January 25, 2013
Glossary

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Library

UpwardTrends

·         Number of informational and reference questions per student and faculty FTE

This number took a sizeable upturn over the previous year from a ratio of 9.3 (7,839) to 10.67 (9,083).  It returned to a level comparable

to 2009-2010.  

·         Number of students attending presentations sessions per student FTE

The 1.07 ratio was the highest in three years and this was accomplished at a time the college has been experiencing a growth rate

among student FTE. This ratio is a significant one since the number of students (834) and presentation sessions (59) has been on a

downturn until this past year.  The number of students is even higher than in 2008-2009. 

·         Number of web accessible computers per student FTE

This year's ratio increased to .049 (38/780) with the addition of seven computers (6 laptops and 1 desktop) to the library's inventory. 

This ratio is significant because it demonstrates the heavy usage of laptop computers (excluding desktops) in the library even though

more students are bringing in their own laptops.  The awareness by students of the availability of laptops and the increase in the library's

laptop inventory probably has contributed to wider use and to this year's usage figure of 768.

·         Number of informational and reference questions answered per FTE librarian

This ratio of 2270.75 increased since the total number of informational and reference questions (9,083) rose above the previous year (7,839).

·         Number of book volumes per student FTE

This library data reveals a sizeable increase over previous years with the total number of physical books (61,894) in the collection along

with e-books provided by Ebrary (78,662) and Ebsco Academic Search Premiere (19,777) subscriptions.  With a total of 160,333 titles

(an increase of 11,489 titles) the ratio of book volumes per student FTE increased significantly to 205.55 with the number of books available

per student FTE at its highest level in the past four years.

·         Common Student Learning Outcome:  The student will evaluate information and its sources critically

The primary tool in addressing the library’s SLO is the pre and post tests for the classes that are given library instruction.  The passing grade

for the tests was elevated from 60% to 70%.  This was an attempt to raise the standards in library literacy and it was deemed a success with

6 out of 10 classes averaging 70% or better in their students’ scores in the post test.  Although previous years passing mark of 60% netted

100% success of all students meeting expectations, this year saw a sizeable number of students’ scores meeting the elevated passing score of 70%.   

·         Student Satisfaction Measurements Using Common Survey Questions

For this past year results from the student satisfaction survey was based on the five point numeral system used for the annual Academic Support

Survey.  Previous APRU numbers were converted from percentages of satisfaction so they would be comparable to the most current APRU.  In

revising the numbers it was found that surveys from certain classes were not included in the original tabulation so the revised numbers are not

as high as the percentages listed in the data chart.  Five of the six satisfaction questions in this past year's APRU showed an increase in satisfaction

over the previous year with the sixth showing only a slight downward trend.  The seventh question was inadvertently left off the student satisfaction

survey for this past year's APRU.  It should be noted that no results are available for faculty since the Academic Support Faculty survey has been

postponed till Spring 2013.

Downward Trends

·         Number of circulations, electronic books used, full text articles downloaded per student and faculty FTE

This seems to be a puzzling anomaly among all the data gathered for this year's APRU.  For three straight years the numbers have grown significantly

but for some unknown reason the number went downward and not just by a small amount.  As far as can be determined there was a sizeable drop in

the downloaded electronic articles; both e-journals and e-books.  In contrast circulated materials (books and reserve materials) via the Voyager system

saw an increase over the previous year's APRU.  This is one downward trend that the library staff needs to investigate and see if students are not

familiar with some of the online databases and whether electronic resources needs to be further emphasized in library instruction.

·         Total materials expenditures per student FTE

This data took a downward trend due to a smaller material expenditure coupled with a larger student FTE.  Two major invoices normally paid during

this year's APRU will be covered in next year's APRU. 

·         Total library expenditures per student and faculty FTE

This ratio showed a slight downturn but kept on a comparable pace with previous years' APRU.

Computer Services

The ratio of online courses to all courses increased slightly with the addition of about half a dozen new distance learning courses.  The number of computer per IT support staff (4) has increased from  137.5 to 162.5.  The metrics for technology workshops are new this year.  Faculty workshops are offered at a rate of .31 workshops per faculty while students receive only .02 technology workshops per FTE.  Almost all of the workshops that are offered to faculty are also available for staff.  In all there were 36 workshops, 2 unique workshops for Faculty, 20 workshops to faculty and staff, and 14 for students. CCSSE Indicators show an increase in use of the internet and technology, and a decline in computer lab use.  This corresponds with the increase in number of users on our wireless network – students are bringing their own devices to campus. The number of wireless devices using our campus network continues to increase. We have allocated another 250 IP addresses, for a total of 750. Our satisfaction survey results have remained unchanged.  We have implemented our desktop management system, but delayed our new Work Order system. We have a commitment with PD to provide Work Order training in Spring 2013.  We feel that the addition of these systems will result in an improved user experience.

Tutoring

Tutoring Services provides tutoring for 54.5 hours per week. The number of students tutored per FTE is 35% (* includes hours tutored which were notreported in SARS) which is a decrease of 5% from last year. This decline is due, in part, to a change in the delivery method in math tutoring that was instated in the spring of 2012. The change was adapted in response to the math faculty’s request. The result was not viewed as favorable by instructors, tutoringservices coordinator, peer tutors or students and that change was abandoned the next semester. Tutoring Services continues to attempt to increase the student use rate and will continue to incorporate specific measures to improve use and efficiencyincluding: 1) more vigorous outreach to classes; 2) demand based scheduling; 3) responsive reduction in hours of underutilized tutors; and 4) increased tutor workplace training to improve return rate of tutored students.

The success rate of tutored students vs. non-tutored students was examined and special attention is paid to English and Math. Sixty-two students weretutored in English compared to 777 English students who were not tutored. The Success rate for tutored students is 84% vs. a 65% success rate for non-tutored students in English. In the area of Math 66 students were tutored vs. 435 students who were not tutored. Data indicates that the success rate fortutored student is 59% and 60% for non-tutored students. Overall (for all subjects tutored), tutored students did better in success rate – an average of 9.7 percentage points higher than non-tutored students. Student evaluations of tutors are again overwhelmingly positive. Students are asked eight questions and are asked to rate their tutoring experience on ascale of 1-3. Of the 629 evaluations submitted respondents answered 98% of the questions as “Yes” or the highest ratings. Students answered 2.7% as“Somewhat” and .18% as “No” or the lowest rating. There were 261 Smarthinking sessions in the 2011-12 school year with 136 sessions in writing (all subjects). The remaining sessions consisted of mainly math and science.

Math Brush-Up program - The Brush-Up program served 62 students in the 2011-2012 school year. This includes fall, spring and summer semesters. The 62 students served is a decrease of 2.9% from the previous school year. Of the 62 students who took the program in 2011-2012, only 28 of them had taken the Compass test before enrolling in the Brush-Up program. It is this group of students who will be looked at to help determine the effectiveness of the Brush-Up program. Of these 28 students 75% of them increased their score on the Compass test. Sixty-eight percent of them (19 students) placed into a higher math class. Another 25% (7 students) placed into the same class and 7% (2 students) placed into a lower class on the Compass re-take. There is no correlation between the time students spent working in the Brush-Up program and improvement in scores on the Compass re-take. Although it is difficult to differentiate between students who were learning the material for the first time and those who learned the material in the past and were just in need of a brief review of the topics, this may explain why the amount of time spent working in the program does not correlate with improvements in scores.

The most recent Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) was administered in 2012. It shows that 36% of students participate in tutoring. This is up by 12% the previous school year. Thirty-three percent of the students report using tutoring services sometimes or often (up from 26%). Frequency has increased from a mean average of 1.47 to 1.61. Increases were also seen in satisfaction and importance with increases 2.27 to 2.3 and from 2.21 to 2.39 respectively. The skills lab frequency has increased slightly (0.06) from 1.72 to 1.78. Students also rated satisfaction slightly higher from 2.26 to 2.3. The notion of importance had the biggest increase, from 2.21 to 2.4. The faculty and staff survey (Appendix 3) has shown improvement in all categories. There has been an increase of more than .4 in the ratings for customer service and satisfaction with the hours of service. The decrease in student contact hours is partly the result of the experiment in the delivery system for math tutoring. We also continue to utilize tutors as receptionists as necessary, especially during peak hours of the day. This adds to the number of students being paid and subtracts from student contact hours.

Testing

Demand/Efficiency:  Demand for placement tests has remained high, seeing a slight increase over the previous year’s data by 0.8%. It aligns with the positive change in headcount enrollment from F’10 to F’11 of 0.4% (UH IRO Fall 2012 CENSUS Headcount). The demand for Distance Learning (DL) proctoring has seen high positive growth of 22.1% indicating that more Kauai students are taking distance courses. Proctoring of Non-UH exams has seen a huge increase of 51.5% going from 66 exams proctored in FY2011 to 100 exams proctored in FY2012. These 100 exams were taken by only 38 students, of which 18 came in more than once and took 80% of the exams. This high level of return could indicate high satisfaction with our services. The other students taking Non-UH exams are often visitors to our island that need to take an exam while on vacation. Demand for campus testing saw huge positive growth of 61.4%. This year’s data growth is even more unexpected than the previous year’s of 19.2%. However, it is due in part to increased full-class Test Center use reservations and due to better record keeping. Previously, full-class lab reservations were booked as a single record such that individual students were not counted in SARS reporting. Subsequently, students taking multiple tests in one sitting were sometimes booked as one appointment with a comment indicating the number of tests the student took. For these, as well, SARS reporting only counted them once. Thus, they were overlooked in the final reporting data.  For the current year’s data, extra effort was taken to ensure records reflect actual activities in the TC. Our policy of proctoring "by appointment only" allows for efficient scheduling of full-class testing without adversely affecting many other students as evidenced by the high 4.86 satisfaction in the services that we offer and the 2.1% improvement in satisfaction with our hours.

This year the TC began offering testing services for professional exams. In July 2011, 20 exams were administered for the Hawaii Dept of Transportation Airports division for their Aircraft Rescue Fire Fighting promotional testing through an agreement made by HDOT-A and Honolulu CC. In April and May 2012, we began administering Automotive Services Excellence (ASE) certification exams. During that testing window, 77 ASE certification exams were administered to 26 different individuals.  We were contacted about this agreement because ASE was phasing out paper exams, and all testing would be delivered remotely via internet. We pursued it because there were no other facilities on Kauai and our campus had been offering the ASE exams in paper form for years. Kauai automotive service providers have, for years, looked to us as a place to improve and maintain their professional standings through testing services. This agreement ensures that our former students and community automotive service people can complete or renew their ASE certifications without having to fly to a neighbor island to do so.

Efficiency indicators show improvement in testing seats per student FTE, with a decline in efficiency for testing seats per total number of tests. Even with this decline in the latter efficiency indicator, overall satisfaction with the TC remains high at 4.86 on a 5-point scale.  In conclusion, the demand for testing is growing and remains healthy. Testing efficiency also remains stable and healthy.

Part III. Action Plan

Library

Action Plan Charts

Program Goal 1

Action Item 1

Resources Needed

Person(s

Responsible

Timeline

Indicator of Improvement

PLO impacted

Status

Collection Develop-ment

 

 

 

 

 

Reallocate some of the book budget toward electronic and digital resources

Portions of the annual $25,000 book budget

Head Librarian

5/2013

Positive feedback from faculty on reallocated resources

 

Assess-ment stage

 

Program Goal 2

Action Item 2

Resources Needed

Person(s

Responsible

Timeline

Indicator of Improvement

PLO impacted

Status

Enrich the Learning Environ-ment

 

 

Upholster lounge chairs and sofas in learning commons

$24,000+

(or at least $12,000 to do a selective number)

College Council and Chancellor

5/2013

Completion of upholstery work

 

Will submit to College Council in spring 2013

 

Program Goal 3

Action Item 3

Resources Needed

Person(s) Responsible

Timeline

Indicator of Improvement

PLO impacted

Status

Access to Techno-logy

Purchase more laptops for the library

Funds dependent on number of laptops

College Council and Chancellor

Fall 2013

Increase in the availability of laptops for student use

 

In planning stage

 

Program Goal 4

Action Item 4

Resources Needed

Person(s) Responsible

Timeline

Indicator of Improvement

PLO impacted

Status

Learning and Teaching

 

 

 

Install a DLP Projector in room 122

$2800

College Council and Chancellor

Fall 2013

On the spot availability of a projector for classroom instruction and meetings

 

Will submit to College Council in Spring 2012

 

Program Goal 4

Action Item 5

Resources Needed

Person(s) Responsible

Timeline

Indicator of Improvement

PLO impacted

Status

Learning and Teaching

 

 

 

 

Implement SFX and Primo Discovery Tool

 

Included within the Voyager annual cost

Library Staff

Spr 2013

Upon completion will provide an all inclusive or one stop search strategy for students accessing library electronic resources

Student will evaluate information and its sources critically

Ongoing

 

Program Goal 4

Action Item 6

Resources Needed

Person(s) Responsible

Timeline

Indicator of Improvement

PLO impacted

Status

Learning and Teaching

 

 

 

 

Develop-ment of additional Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

None

Library Staff

Spr 2013

Scores of students assessment will be higher

Student will evaluate information and its sources critically

In develop-ment stage

 

Program Goal 5

Action Item 7

Resources Needed

Person(s) Responsible

Timeline

Indicator of Improvement

PLO impacted

Status

Steward-ship of resources and the environ-ment

 

Replace and Install 5 com-

mercial grade dehumidi-fiers

5 @ $2200 = $11,000

 

College Council and Chancellor

Fall 2013

Control of mold and mildew within the collection and study areas

 

Will submit to College Council in Spring 2013

Computer Services

College/Program

Goal

Action Item

Resources

Needed

Person(s)

Resp.

Timeline

Indicator of Improvement

PLO

Impacted

Status

 

KCC Goals 1,2,3,& 5

CS Goal 1:  Meet the College’s academic and administrative network and computing needs.

 

Upgrade backbone to 10Gb and improve connectivity to wiring closets and desktops.  Have gigabit connections to all desktops.

 

TT, MR,

TK

F2011

Improved user satisfaction ratings Benchmarks: CCSSE students 2.42 mean average

Fac/Staff satisfaction with quality of work 4.19 average

1,3

Completed Gigabit to Desktop. 10Gb to major buildings by F2012,

All build. By F2013

2012 CCSSE Satisfaction =2.58

2012Fac/Staff Satisfaction =4.19

 

Implement security features for wireless system to account for all wireless users. 

 

TK,TT

Sum2011

Reduce the number of illegal downloads, Increase the success rate of tracking down users who violate copyright laws.

 

Completed F2011

 

Increase number of notebooks available in Library

 

SS,MR

F2011

Reduced number of times Library does not have notebooks to check out.

1

Completed Dec 2011

 

Increase IP Address allocations for Wireless system, move Fac/Staff/Admin to different wireless network, upgrade DHCP servers.

 

TK

S2012

Improved user satisfaction ratings Benchmarks: CCSSE students 2.42 mean average

Fac/Staff satisfaction with quality of work 4.19 average

1,3

Completed S2012.

 

F2012 added 250 for total of 750

By F2013

 

2012 CCSSE Satisfaction =2.58

2012Fac/Staff Satisfaction =4.19

 

 

Upgrade Access Points in High Density Areas

 

TK, TT

S2013

Improved user satisfaction

1,3

 

 

Upgrade  xythos Drive software

 

TK

S2012

Improved user satisfaction ratings

Fac/Staff satisfaction with quality of work 4.19 average

3

Completed S2012

2012Fac/Staff Satisfaction =4.19

 

Scheduled computer replacement for Faculty, Staff & Admin

 

ALL

F2012

Improved user satisfaction ratings

Fac/Staff satisfaction with quality of work 4.19 average

3

Ongoing

2012Fac/Staff Satisfaction =4.19

 

Scheduled computer replacement for Classrooms

 

ALL

S2012

Improved user satisfaction ratings Benchmarks:  CCSSE students 2.42 mean average

Fac/Staff satisfaction with quality of work 4.19 average

3

Completed 80% of classrooms

 

2012 CCSSE Satisfaction =2.58

2012Fac/Staff Satisfaction =4.19

 

Scheduled computer replacement for CRC, BUS110, BUS111, EngLab

 

ALL

F2012

Improved user satisfaction ratings Benchmarks:  CCSSE students 2.42 mean average

Fac/Staff satisfaction with quality of work 4.19 average

3

Delayed to Summer 2013

 

2012 CCSSE Satisfaction =2.58

2012Fac/Staff Satisfaction =4.19

KCC Goals 1,2,3,4, & 5

Goal 2.  Enhance the College’s academic and administrative computing support services.

Implement Desktop management system to streamline the routine tasks necessary to manage and maintain a secure and efficient IT infrastructure. 

 

SS,MR,TK

F2011

Reduce helpdesk contacts from 52. 

 

Improve helpdesk resolution time to above 27% for 1-2 days. 

 

1,3

Delayed:

User training scheduled with PD for Spring 2013

 

Test pilot a kiosk in heavy use areas on campus, allowing users to schedule a time for computer help or get assistance through remote access

 

ALL

F2011

Keep helpdesk satisfaction questions above 90%.

1,3

Delayed to Summer 2013

KCC Goals 1,2,3,4,5 & 6

Goal 3.  Improve Communication with Campus Community

Continue current methods of service interruption notifications.

 

 

SS

Continuous

Improved user satisfaction ratings Benchmarks:  CCSSE students 2.42 mean average

Fac/Staff satisfaction with quality of work 4.19 average

2

Continuous

 

2012 CCSSE Satisfaction =2.58

2012Fac/Staff Satisfaction =4.19

 

ITAC will host open forums (physical and electronic) that will give the campus community an opportunity to voice technology concerns.

 

TK,SS

Continuous

Improved user satisfaction ratings Benchmarks:  CCSSE students 2.42 mean average

Fac/Staff satisfaction with quality of work 4.19 average

1

Spring 2012

 

2012 CCSSE Satisfaction =2.58

2012Fac/Staff Satisfaction =4.19

 

ITAC and Computer Services’ website will go live during Summer 2011.

 

SS,MR,TK

Sum2011

Improved user satisfaction ratings Benchmarks:  CCSSE students 2.42 mean average

Fac/Staff satisfaction with quality of work 4.19 average

1

Completed

 

2012 CCSSE Satisfaction =2.58

2012Fac/Staff Satisfaction =4.19

 

Work with ITAC to complete IT plan and incorporate ITAC processes into the APRU and College Council budget reallocation process.

 

TK

Fall2011

Improved user satisfaction ratings Benchmarks:  CCSSE students 2.42 mean average

Fac/Staff satisfaction with quality of work 4.19 average

1

Completed

Fall 2011

 

2012 CCSSE Satisfaction =2.58

2012Fac/Staff Satisfaction =4.19

KCC Goals 5 & 6

 

Goal 4.  Promote Sustainability. 

Reduce/Reuse/Recycle

During Summer 2011, we plan to upgrade 160 monitors to larger units that use 8-10 watts less than our current monitors

 

SS,MR,TT,TK

Sum2011

Save x kilowatts for the campus.  Reduce the campus’ carbon footprint.

1

Completed

150 during Fall 2011, will continue as equipment is replaced

 

Secure space to process equipment to be reused and store palletized equipment/parts in between recycling events. Implement desktop management features to reduce energy waste.

 

TK

 

Reduce the campus’ carbon footprint.

1

Acquired enclosed bay under Elections building.

KCC Goal 4

 

Goal 5.  Create and support ongoing opportunities for technology-related professional development.

Continue to partner with other college committees to provide technology – related workshops for faculty and staff. 

 

MR, SS, TT, TK

Annually

 

3

Ongoing.

Scheduled to host PD workshop on new Workorder system in Spring 2013

 

Schedule time for professional development opportunities for the computer services staff.

 

SS,MR,

TT,TK

Annually

Improve helpdesk resolution time to above 27% for 1-2 days. 

 

Reduce processing time for workorders (from 1-3 days)

3

Continuous

 

 

 

2012 processing time = 1 day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tutoring

ACTION ITEM

RESOURCES

NEEDED

PERSON(S)

RESPONSIBLE

TIMELINE

GOAL

INDICATOR OF

IMPROVEMENT

PLO IMPACTED

STATUS

3. Expand, and report on the success of, the COMPASS Brush-up program and increase success of students in the program.

 

 

1.  Time of LC Coordinator

2.  Time of Counselors

3.  Time of IR or Dean of Student Services to provide rough data for report

4.  Lab area for COMPASS Brush-up classes

 

Tutoring Center Coordinator, Student Services counselors, IR/Dean of Student Services.

Target: Fall 2013 

Access:To increase students’ access to the Tutoring Center facilities and services to improve learning and student engagement.

Learning and Teaching:To provide learning assistance and resources for students of all ability levels and class rank to improve class performance, engage with the campus community, and succeed in attaining their academic, personal, and career goals.

 

Strategic Priority:

Goal 1:  Educational Effectiveness and Student Success – a) Student Retention and Success of All Students; b) increased completion of degrees, certificates, and licensure; and c) completion of Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs).

1)      Additional 5% increase in number of Brush-up participants during F09/S10.

 

 

2)      Report documenting success (persistence, success in classes) of Brush-up students

 

3)      5% increase in success rate of students taking the Brush-up class.

 

 

 

 

Students who receive tutoring will pass their tutored course

Outcome #1:

2011-12: Not met.  Number of participants decreased by 8.8% from 68 in ‘10-‘11 to 62 in ‘11-‘12 (i.e. 8.8%)

 

2011-12: 62 students

 

Outcome #2:

2011-12: Awaiting data on success/persistence

 

Outcome #3: TBD

4.  Improve access to tutoring by making Smarthinking (online tutoring service) available to all students 24x7

$5000/yr subscription fee

Tutoring Center Coordinator

Annually beginning Fall 2012

Access:To increase students’ access to the Tutoring Center facilities and services to improve learning and student engagement.

Learning and Teaching:To provide learning assistance and resources for students of all ability levels and class rank to improve class performance, engage with the campus community, and succeed in attaining their academic, personal, and career goals.

 

Improvement in CCSSE indicators.

Students who receive tutoring will pass their tutored course

Data not available

 

Testing

 

Program Goal

Action Item

Resources Needed

Person(s) Responsible

Timeline

Indicator of Improvement

PLO impacted

Status

TC1a - TC2b, TC2d - TC3b

Update computer equipment to meet testing requirements for a variety of tests.

33 computer stations

Esther Miller / Tom Kajihara

Fall 2013

Ability to meet the needs of class testing and new compass testing

 

57.6% done

 

Move over to eCompass placement testing

New computer systems

Esther Miller / Tom Kajihara

Spring 2013

Improved technical administration of COMPASS

 

25% done

TC1c & TC3a

Complete ASE Prometric agreement

New computer stations

Esther Miller / Others

Spring 2012

Improve access -

Administered tests increase from 3047. 

 

Done

TC1c & TC3a

Reopen discussion with PRAXIS representative to offer internet based testing (iBT)

New computer stations

Esther Miller / Others

Summer 2013

Improve community access to education.

Administered tests increase from 3047. 

 

20% done

TC1b & TC3b

Pursue CLEP and DSST test site partnerships

New computer stations

Esther Miller / Student Services

Summer 2013

Improve access to more potential students-

Administered tests increase from 3047. 

 

15% done

TC1a & TC2a

Provide noise blocking headsets for the majority of seats

20 noise blocking headsets

Esther Miller

Spring 2012

Student comments on survey will be reduced and question on atmosphere will increase above 4.9%

 

50% done

TC1a & TC2a

Reduce noise from neighboring offices/hallway

Acoustic panels

Esther Miller / Maintenance

Summer 2013

Student comments on survey will be reduced and question on atmosphere will increase above 4.9%

 

25% done

TC1a & TC2a

Reduce noise transmitted through door between Student Counseling & Advising and Test Center

Quiet Door  installation kit

Esther Miller / Maintenance

Fall 2012

Student comments on survey will be reduced and question on atmosphere will increase above 4.9%

 

Awaiting installation

TC1a & TC2a

Reduce noise from entry door opening/closing

Door check / door damper

Maintenance

Fall 2012

Student comments on survey will be reduced and question on atmosphere will increase above 4.9%

 

 

 "

TC1a - TC4a

Soundproof/sound dampening proctor station area1

Construction of sound booth or installation of acoustic that will dampen activities at the proctor station while still allowing clear view of the testing area

Esther Miller / Maintenance / Carpentry?

Summer 2014

Student comments on survey will be reduced and question on atmosphere will increase above 4.93.

 

 

TC4a,

TC2a

Provide safe and ample seating for students2

Three adjustable, wheeled office chairs

Esther Miller

Summer 2013

 

 

 

TC4a & TC1a

Mount displays on swing arms to safeguard staff from injury due to repeatedly lifting/moving displays back and forth for optimal paper/computerized testing3

10 swing arms

Esther Miller / Computer Services

Fall 2013

Improved student satisfaction with atmosphere

 

 

TC4a & TC2c

Provide a storage space for student belongings in the TC away from testing stations to ensure easy access to exits in case of fire and to uphold academic integrity in testing4

Sturdy wooden shelf similar to those in Bookstore

Esther Miller/ Maintenance/ Carpentry?

Summer 2013

Improved security of student items, safe exiting in an emergency, decreased cheating incidents

 

 

TC2b

Provide alternate test drop site/method for after hours

Partnership or lockable drop box

Esther Miller / Maintenance

Fall  2013

Faculty survey scores for hours will be higher than 40% satisfaction rate.

 

 

TC2b

Streamline proctoring request method for campus testing

none

Esther Miller / various faculty

Fall 2013

Faculty satisfaction will increase above 48%

 

 

TC2a

 Improve marketing efforts to increase student and faculty awareness of available hours and services

None

Esther Miller

Spring 2013

Faculty satisfaction will increase above 48%

 

 

TC2a

Look for outdated/conflicting testing information and ask for removal or correction

None

Esther Miller

Spring 2013

Survey comments regarding standard information will decrease.

 

 

TC2c

Provide secure storage for testing supplies and additional equipment5

Lockable storage cabinet

Esther Miller

Summer 2013

Improve safety, security, and proctoring

 

10%

TC2c &  TC4a

Repurpose current Proctor station machine as the "server" for our digital video camera security system AND purchase preconfigured multi-camera system.6

Larger hard drive, additional memory, network clearance; camera system, network clearance.

Esther Miller / Tom Kajihara

Summer 2013

Improve safety, security, and proctoring

 

 

TC2c

Have some sort of assistance or panic button in case of emergency.7

Alert/panic button

Esther Miller / Pat Watase?

Spring 2013

Improved safety of staff and users

 

 

 

New proctor station to replace the one being repurposed as security system server

Computer system

Esther Miller / Tom Kajihara

Spring 2013

Upgrade coordinator workstation

 

 

Part IV. Resource Implications

Library

Program Goal 1/Action Item 1:  With the continuation of the $25,000 annual book budget the library will always strive to upgrade the book collection but also is looking toward reallocating some of the funds to electronic or digital format materials.  For instance, after a trial run of Films on Demand, faculty from various divisions have been requesting continuation of this digital archive as part of the library’s resources.

2.  Program Goal 2/Action Item 2:  During summer 2012, 138 study chairs in the library were upholstered with new fabric to present an updated look to the learning environment.  Currently there are 27 lounge chairs and 16 sofas that need to be upholstered to complete the furniture renovation.  Estimated cost for both would run in the neighborhood of $24,000+.  A more reasonable approach would be to take care of the lounge chairs or sofas first and save the remaining for another year.  An alternate option would be to purchase new furniture to replace the remaining pieces. 

3.  Program Goal 3/Action Item 3:  Since the last APRU there are now 38 desktops and laptops in the library.  Even with this increase in hardware the library is still experiencing heavy demand from not only students but also faculty and staff who are requesting long-term loans of laptops (768 loans in 2011-2012).  A remedy for the latter clientele may be to have the IT department on campus have a supply of laptops as loaners.  Outside of that possible solution there may also be a need for additional laptops for library instruction.

4. Program Goal 4/Action Item 4:  Installation of a DLP (ceiling) projector will enhance the learning process for students.  Currently an instructor needs to bring in a projector from media services to aid in their instruction.  This action plan will also be beneficial for library instruction since this is a primary classroom for the instructional librarian.  An estimate of $2800 includes the projector, ceiling mount bracket, DVI cable, and electrical work in ceiling.

5. Program Goal 4/Action Item 5:  The library staff is currently in the midst of implementing the Ex Libris SFX link resolver and Primo discovery tool.  Students and faculty will benefit from this one stop search tool and enhance their research work.  This was a UH Library System decision that was agreed upon in late 2011.  Price for the SFX/Primo system along with the new server will be prorated in the annual Voyager cost over the coming years.

5. Program Goal 4/Action Item 6:  The library staff is currently looking at incorporating additional Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs).  For the past year the entire UH community college libraries have implemented a uniform SLO.  However, with the recent visiting Accreditation team's recommendation to accelerate the use of SLOs campus-wide, the library will be evaluating other SLOs to add to the library's assessment of its program.

6. Program Goal 5/Action Item 7:  To promote the health and safety of its clientele and the maintenance of its collection the library proposes to replace existing dehumidifiers and add additional ones on both floors of the building.  There are currently three small dehumidifiers on the first floor but only two that are operational.  None are presently located on the second floor.  The proposal is to replace the three units on the first floor with commercial grade units and install two units on the upper floor.  At approximately $2200 per unit the total cost for five would be around $11,000.  The commercial grade units would be more efficient in controlling humidity in the library.

Computer Services

Computer Services was granted last year’s APRU request for additional storage space. We acquired the enclosed bay under the Elections building in Summer 2012, cleared the space and began partitioning. We were able to use it for the Fall 2012 e-cycling project, and will use it to salvage and store parts until next quarter’s e-cycling.  The space allowed us to move out of 2 offices in the Social Science Building.

Tutoring

No resources beyond the current budget are needed.

Testing

Spring 2013

 

1.      15 computers

$10,500

2.      3 adjustable, wheeled office chairs

$450

3.      Plastic containers, various sizes

$100

4.      Hard drive/memory for proctor station

$200

5.      1 display swing arm

$100

TOTAL

$11,350

 

 

Summer 2013

 

1.      17 displays (17”)

$3,400

2.      Security camera system

$1,200

3.      Wooden shelving/cubbyholes

$500

4.      Lockable storage cabinet

$300

5.      Lockable drop box

$200

6.      2 display swing arms

$200

TOTAL

$5,800

 

 

Fall 2013

 

1.      Acoustic panels for SS break room

$3000

2.      10 noise blocking headsets

$200

3.      2 display swing arms

$200

4.      Lockable drop box (outdoor)

$450

TOTAL

$3,850

 

 

Spring 2014

 

1.      16 displays (17")

$3,200

2.      5 display swing arms

$500

TOTAL

$14,150

 

 

Summer 2014

 

Proctor station “room” build out

$12,500

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2011-2012 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Library PSLO: The student will evaluate information and its sources critically.

2

Yes
Computer Services: Identify the technological needs of the campus and systematically address these needs in and provide an efficient solution.

3

Yes
Computer Services: Provide reliable network services.

4

Yes
Computer Services: Provide technical support for campus users

5

Yes
Tutoring: Students who receive tutoring will pass their tutored course.

6

No
Testing: KCC Testing Center supports instructional and academic advising faculty by providing ADA-compliant access to course-related and COMPASS tests.

7

No
Testing: KCC Testing Services supports professional and workforce development by providing professional certification examination facilities that meet requirements as set forth by test originators and professional agencies.

8

No
Testing: KCC Testing Services provide and maintain a safe, secure testing environment in the highest compliance with professional testing standards and practices.

A) Expected Level Achievement

LIbrary

The library's single student learning outcome (SLO) is assessed with pre and post tests administered to students participating in library instruction.  The minimum level of competency for both tests over the past few years has been a passing score of 60%.  Due to the low passing score a majority of students have attained the minimum level of passing for both the pre and post tests.  In Action Plan 4 of last year's APRU the library set the goal of increasing the minimum passing grade for both tests at 70%.  This would raise the bar and make it equivalent to a C grade since it was deemed attainable for many students.

Computer Services

Outcome 1:  For each interation of the CCSSE survey, student satisfaction with services will steadily improve from 2.42 (2010).

Outcome 2:  Increase network availability and decrease disruptions of service.

Outcome 3:  Increase faculty/staff satisfaction to 4.5 by 2015.

B) Courses Assessed

Library

The library's single student learning outcome (SLO) is assessed with pre and post tests administered to students participating in library instruction.  The classes that assign library instruction varies from semester to semester.

 

Computer Services

The Computer Services service learning outcomes apply to the entire campus.

 

Tutoring

The Tutoring SLO addresses students who are tutored and those who are not tutored but who take the same courses.  The courses will vary from semester to semester.

C) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Library

The library's single student learning outcome (SLO) is assessed with pre and post tests administered to students participating in library instruction. 

Computer Services

 Outcome 1:  Identify the technological needs of the campus and systematically address these needs in and provide an efficient solution.

Assessment:  Surveys (CCSSE, Academic support), ITAC, ITAC open forums,

Outcome 2:  Provide reliable network services.

Assessment:  Network usage/availability logs.

Outcome 3:  Provide technical support for campus users.

Assessment: Trouble call feedback and faculty/staff satisfaction survey meausrements.

 

Testing

Service Outcome:  KCC Testing Center supports instructional and academic advising faculty by providing ADA-compliant access to course-related and COMPASS tests.

Assessments:  Number of placement tests administered per year per student FTE, Number of tests using ADA-accommodations administered per year per student FTE, Local campus tests proctored per year per student FTE, faculty survey results, student survey results.

Service Outcome:  KCC Testing Services supports professional and workforce development by providing professional certification examination facilities that meet requirements as set forth by test originators and professional agencies.

Assessments:  Number of professional tests administered per year for students and community members.

 

Service Outcome:  KCC Testing Services provide and maintain a safe, secure testing environment in the highest compliance with professional testing standards and practices.

Assessments:  Steps taken to improve testing environment, student satisfaction survey, faculty survey results, inspection reports from external testing agencies.

D) Results of Program Assessment

Library

While this year's APRU does not have similar high percentages for the SLO as in previous years it does indicate that a majority of the classes that participated in library instruction and took part in the pre and post tests did show improvement on the latter.  Of the ten classes (see Appendix A) that had their students take the pre tests four scored 70% or higher.  However, when these classes later took the post tests at the end of the semester six classes met the minimum of 70%.  It should also be noted that the percentages of the four that did not meet the minimum would have passed in the previous year's cutoff point of 60%.  These four classes ranged from 64% to 68% on the post tests. 

Special mention should be made of English 21 which is a remedial class.  In this particular class students scored 48% on the pre test but made a dramatic improvement to 64% on the post test.  While they did not meet the 70% their efforts was impressive among all the classes.  This was the second highest percentage jump of the ten classes that participated in library instruction and the accompanying tests.  Only students in Botany 105 made a higher jump with a 17% increase.

A curious feature of the statistical data concerns the difference in the number of students that took the pre and post tests for each class.  In most cases the number of students was less who took the post tests.  This may be due to students who have dropped classes by the end of the semester or students not being present when the post test was administered in class.  Conversely there were two classes that seemed to have picked up a few more students by the end of the semester with a greater number taking the post test.  It can be inferred that these additional students did not take the pre tests.

Computer Services

 Outcome 1:  Identify the technological needs of the campus and systematically address these needs in and provide an efficient solution.Assessment:  Surveys (CCSSE, Academic support), ITAC, ITAC open forums,

As discussed previously in Part II under the analysis section, faculty and staff satisfaction measurements are the same as last year. The mean average for student satisfaction has gone up in the past two years by 16% (from  2.42 to 2.58).  We have updated the Computer Services website, and the ITAC website is online.  Computer Services via ITAC will continue to solicit input and discuss the campus’ changing technological needs.

Outcome 2:  Provide reliable network services.

Assessment:  Network usage/availability logs.

We have included a sample of network statistics collected over the past two years. Data prior to mid-October 2011 reflect just a portion of our network traffic.   Although 2011’s data  is incomplete, it shows significant growth in our network use.  We will include a separate report for our wireless network use in our 2013 APRU.  Due to  changes in our wireless system during Summer 2012, data for 2012 is incomplete.

Outcome 3:  Provide technical support for campus users.

Assessment: Trouble call feedback.

As discussed above, our faculty and staff  satisfaction survey results have remained unchanged.  We have implemented our desktop management system, but delayed our new Work Order system.  We have a commitment with PD to provide training in Spring 2013.  We feel that the addition of these systems will result in an improved user experience.

Testing

The Service Learning Outcomes for Testing have just been established this year.  Data will be collected and analysed in the 2012-2013 APRU.

E) Other Comments

Library

A curious feature of the statistical data concerns the difference in the number of students that took the pre and post tests for each class.  In most cases the number of students was less who took the post tests.  This may be due to students who have dropped classes by the end of the semester or students not being present when the post test was administered in class.  Conversely there were two classes that seemed to have picked up a few more students by the end of the semester with a greater number taking the post test.  It can be inferred that these additional students did not take the pre tests.

F) Next Steps

Library

In next year's APRU there will be additional SLOs to assess library literacy of students in regard to library services.  The library staff is currently studying and analyzing different methodologies of evaluating student learning through literature and visitation of other libraries within the University of Hawaii System.