University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Academic Support Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

Select the desired review year, college, and program from the drop down menus. Once a program has been selected, the results will be displayed.

Review Year: College: Program:

College: Honolulu Community College
Program: Testing Services

Printer Friendly

PDF PDF

Program did not provide date of the last comprehensive review.

Program Description

The College Skills Center (Testing and Tutoring)

The College Skills Center provides access to the skills necessary for students to become responsible, self-directed learners.

Outcomes and Goals

  1. Students and faculty will receive quality testing services to meet their academic support needs.
  1. Students and faculty will receive quality in-person and online tutoring services that meet their academic support needs.
  1. Students enrolled in the Brush-Up courses will develop the necessary skills to place higher than the levels in Essentials English and/or math.
  1. Students and faculty will receive quality service learning support to meet their academic support needs.

History

The College Skills Center (CSC), was originally called the Learning Assistance Center (LAC), began with city funds, and in 1981 was primarily funded by Title III federal funds. Academic support services included drop-in tutoring in various subjects and testing. The Center has since converted personnel positions to general-funded positions and expanded to provide; distance education/placement testing support, and non-UH testing; and the delivery of entry-level math and English non-credit classes and college study skills courses.

In August 16, 2010, a memo from Chancellor Mike Rota informed the CSC that the math and English faculty members will be moved to the Mathematics and Language Arts departments, respectively. Remedial courses were also transferred to these departments.

A subsequent e-mail from Vice-Chancellor of Academic Affairs Erika Lacro was sent out on March 16, 2011, to inform CSC that the Math and Language Arts departments are to cover mathematics and English tutoring services with their own budgets. The College Skills Center was then told to focus on tutoring at the higher levels.

On August 16, 2012, the College’s reorganization chart was approved. In this new structure, CSC is in the Testing and Tutoring component of Student Success within the Academic Support Division.

An Assessment Workshop (April 17-19, 2013) was followed by a meeting with Russell Uyeno, Interim Vice-Chancellor of Academic Affairs and Chair Jerry Saviano, of Student Success. CSC’s current SLO’s were approved with goals to be established. According to the Accreditation Report (p. 45), the other newly separated units (i.e., Essentials English, Essentials Math) “need to go through their own program review process.”

 

Staff

As a result of the above changes, CSC staff members have been transferred to different departments resulting in the following CSC staffing:

1 Coordinator

1 Math faculty (relocated back to Math Department effective August 2013)

3 T & F and 1 Perkins-funded educational specialists (testing, tutoring, service learning)

1 VISTA member (high school outreach and service learning)

1 clerical staff

LSK 30/30A lecturer

1 .50 IT specialist (selection, maintenance, installation of computer hardware/software programs to service students and staff)

Student assistants (testing/tutoring)

 

 

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Not Yet Applied

Student and Faculty Information Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 Annual Unduplicated Student Headcount   6,039 5,878  
2 Annual FTE Faculty   151 159
2a Annual FTE Staff   184 179
3 Annual FTE Student   2,512 2,469

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
4 Number of placement test sessions administered per year per student FTE   0.8 2,053 Not Yet Applied
5 Number of Distance Learning tests administered per year per student FTE   1.1 2,455
6 Local campus tests proctored per year per student FTE   2.4 6,921

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
7 Number of test sessions administered per FTE testing center staff     11,429 Not Yet Applied
8 Annual operational testing center budget allocation per number of test sessions administered   $0 $80,000

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
Satisfaction measurements using Common Survey questions Not Yet Applied
9-1 The hours at the Testing Center meet my needs     4.9%
9-2 The atmosphere at the Testing Center is conducive to testing     4.9%
9-3 The services at the Testing Center are satisfactory     4.9%
9-4 My test was administered in a timely and efficient manner     4.9%
Last Updated: November 14, 2013

Glossary

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Testing Center continues to meets it stated goals (see below) and have consistently met effective measures despite challenges with on-going building renovations and relocation of operations. 

In FY 2013-2012 the goal is add an additional APT to the Testing to assist in covering the expanding service needs of our campus and system. 

Goals:

Student satisfaction surveys will average 4.0 or higher on a 1 – 5 (highly satisfied) rating scale.

Of 399 students surveyed for Fall 2012 and Spring 2013 semesters, the average overall score is 4.9 on a 5.0 rating scale. Students have indicated that they are very satisfied with the testing services provided; therefore, no further analysis is needed. Since these satisfaction survey results have been consistently high, other survey instruments may be developed to further assess testing services.

 

Number of tests administered will be above 9,000 per fiscal year.

In FY 2013, 11,429 tests were administered, meeting the goal of 9,000 tests. Because CSC is being moved to a temporary location which has a much smaller space and seat capacity in Fall 2013 due to building renovations, counts are expected to be less, so the goal will remain the same.

Part III. Action Plan

Hiring a Second APT for Testing - (position currently being reassigned to testing to address this need)

There is one APT position designated as a testing coordinator. For coverage of testing during the day and evening hours to students at HCC and system-wide, a second APT position would support the increased demand for testing services

 

Access to Additional Room for Testing as needed (currently division is in the process of evaluating space needs usage)

 

Part IV. Resource Implications

None at this time

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Student satisfaction surveys will average 4.0 or higher on a 1 – 5 (highly satisfied) rating scale.

2

Yes
Number of tests administered will be above 9,000 per fiscal year.

A) Expected Level Achievement

No content.

B) Courses Assessed

No content.

C) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Student Survey

D) Results of Program Assessment

Student satisfaction surveys will average 4.0 or higher on a 1 – 5 (highly satisfied) rating scale.

Of 399 students surveyed for Fall 2012 and Spring 2013 semesters, the average overall score is 4.9 on a 5.0 rating scale. Students have indicated that they are very satisfied with the testing services provided; therefore, no further analysis is needed. Since these satisfaction survey results have been consistently high, other survey instruments may be developed to further assess testing services.

Number of tests administered will be above 9,000 per fiscal year.

In FY 2013, 11,429 tests were administered, meeting the goal of 9,000 tests. Because CSC is being moved to a temporary location which has a much smaller space and seat capacity in Fall 2013 due to building renovations, counts are expected to be less, so the goal will remain the same.

 

 

E) Other Comments

No content.

F) Next Steps

Continue to evaluate, assess, and make program improvements based on data.