University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Academic Support Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Hawaii Community College Executive Summary Printer Friendly
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The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs is comprised of a Vice Chancellor who is the college’s Chief Academic Officer, the Dean of Liberal Arts and Public Services, the Dean of Career and Technical Education and an Academic Support Unit (ASU). Both of the deans’ positions support instructional programs.

ASU Mission Statement

The Academic Support Unit (ASU) supports the needs of instructional programs, as well as academic support units to promote student learning in curricular and co-curricular endeavors.

ASU Unit Outcomes

In March 2013, the ASU developed and approved two Unit Outcomes, which are:

  1. The ASU will provide resources and services to faculty and staff to enable them to efficiently carry out their duties and responsibilities.
  2. The ASU will provide resources and services to promote student success.

Description of ASU

The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs is the administrator who oversees the Academic Support Unit (ASU). ASU, as defined by the approved organizational chart, is comprised of the following. Additional areas (not identified by the organizational chart) of ASU are identified in italics.

The Academic Computing Unit (including Computer Services/IT Support, Media Services, and College Webmaster), the Learning Center and Hale Kea Advancement & Testing Center, and the Libraries conduct their own annual unit reviews and comprehensive unit reviews as part of the five-year cycle.

AcademicComputing Unit (ASU) (includingComputer Services/IT Support, Media Services, and College Webmaster)

ACU is no longer descriptive of only IT Support . It is a collection of services reporting to the VCAA including Computer Services/IT Support, Media Services, and College Webmaster

Computer Services

The mission of Computer Services is to meet our College‘s existing and evolving technological demands. This group provides service and support in areas related to computer hardware and software, as well as wired and wireless networking to support voice, video, and data. Successful achievement of the mission will provide necessary services to students, staff, faculty, and administrators living, learning, and working on our island.

Quantitative Analysis of Computer Services/IT Support

DEMAND data:

EFFICIENCY data:

EFFECTIVENESS data:

External Factors Affecting Computer Services/IT Support Services

Action Plan

Media Services

The Media Services unit for HawCC, has its headquarters at Manono Campus and provides services for faculty and staff at this location as well as HawCC needs on the Upper Campus. In addition to the day to day duties operating and maintaining media technology at Hawai’i Community College, the Media unit worked with the Rural Development Program (RDP) office to plan to purchase additional high definition Polycom video conferencing equipment in a second round of purchasing from the Federal grant for upgrading video conferencing equipment.

Quantitative Analysis

DEMAND  

EFFICIENCY: In late April and early May 2013, a survey of faculty and staff was done. Results follow:

1. Classroom equipment services – video projectors, VCRs, DVD players, visual presenters, etc.

2. Media Operation/Support, Maintenance and Repair, etc.

EFFECTIVENESS: The same survey during late April and early May 2013 of faculty and staff also looked at effectiveness. Results follow:

1. Classroom equipment services – video projectors, VCRs, DVD players, visual presenters, etc

2. Media Operation/Support, Maintenance and Repair, etc.

3. I think my capability to instruct has increased as a result of the services provided by:

4. I think student learning has increased as a result of the services and technologies provided by:

5. Media equipment operation and training

Qualitative Analysis of Media Services East Hawaii

External Factors Affecting Media Services East Hawaii

None were reported.

Action Plan

Media equipment operation manuals created by the Media unit had modest success. On demand training videos covering problem topics will be investigated for posting on the College web page. For individuals who prefer hands on, face to face training, workshops and training sessions need to scheduled, publicized through College resources, and run. A method to identify media-challenged employees and alternatives for training could be created.

Web Developer

The Web Developer provides departments, programs, and units many services in support of the college web site. Services include development or maintenance of web pages, project planning, troubleshooting support, graphic support, social media support, video (for web) editing and publishing, etc. These services impact the user experience of the college web site.

Mission: to provide continuous support and improvement of the college website through developing or assisting units, programs, and departments with their web page needs as it supports the colleges' ongoing mission and goals.

Unit Outcomes:

  1. The Web Developer assists units and departments to meet the College’ webpage needs.
  2. The Web Developer provides continuous support and improvement of the HawaiiCC website by responding to faculty and staff in an effective and timely manner.
  3. The Web Developer provides a long range vision and strategy of the HawaiiCC web site which embodies current trends and emerging technologies.

Quantitative Analysis of services provided by the Web Developer

DEMAND data:

EFFICIENCY data:

EFFECTIVENESS data:

Qualitative Analysis of College Web Developer

Factors Affecting College Web Developer

Action Plan

The Learning Center (TLC) and Hale Kea Advancement and Testing Center (HKATC)

The Learning Center (TLC) is an academic support program of Hawai‘i Community College. It is a shared service with University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. Over the years, TLC has maintained its strong ties to instruction, providing faculty with an extension to their classroom and providing academic support college-wide. Its basic role of supporting faculty and students in reading, writing, math, and ESL continues to be the focus which provides a firm academic foundation for all students. TLC services include:

Hale Kea Advancement and Testing Center (HKATC) focuses on providing testing services, coordinating the use of an electronic classroom, tutoring in writing and math, and providing an independent study center with computers on the Manono Campus. HKATC services include:

Mission: TLC and HKATC seek to provide services that support and enhance academic development for the college community. These services focus on academic support for an “open door” institution, providing initial student assessment, access to technology, support for successful learning, and testing services.

Unit Outcomes:

  1. Students who receive tutoring will pass their tutored course. (System-wide common SLO).
  2. TLC/HKATC will provide tutoring services for students to support their success in their academic endeavors.
  3. TLC/HKATC will provide an open access computer lab for students.
  4. HKATC will provide the College and community with testing services for placement, distance education, certification, special testing, and make-up testing.

Quantitative Analysis of TLC/HKATC for TUTORING

Tutoring data are shown for TLC and HKATC as both now provide such services. Some of the data are separated to show the increased demand for tutoring services on the Manono Campus provided by HKATC.

DEMAND data for Tutoring:

The first two indicators for tutoring demand scored in the healthy category of the scoring rubric.

EFFICIENCY for Tutoring:

Strengths

 Weaknesses

All indicators for efficiency still remained healthy in spite of a drop in contact hours and a budget increase in the contact hour.

EFFECTIVENESS for Tutoring:

Strengths

•     CCSSE survey results (averaged mean score) was 2.0

Both indicators scored healthy.

Weaknesses

Although there was an increase, this indicator scored cautionary.

Quantitative Analysis of HKATC only for TESTING

Testing data are shown for HKATC only as it is solely responsible for the administration of testing services for the College.

DEMAND for Testing:

Strengths

This indicator is healthy.

Weaknesses

The first indicator above is unhealthy and the second indicator is cautionary.

EFFICIENCY for Testing:

Efficiency is healthy for these two indicators.

EFFECTIVENESS for Testing:

Student evaluation surveys are conducted (100 collected) at the end of the Fall semester by the HKATC manager.  Data of the number of placement, distance education, and make-up testing are compiled to determine the demand and satisfaction of testing services. A positive 97% or above was given to all survey questions, exceeding the expected level of achievement (90% is target), except for the question stating, “The hours at the Testing Center meet my needs” which received an 88% rating.

Quantitative Analysis of TLC/HKATC for Computer Lab use

Part of the mission for TLC and HKATC is to provide an open access computer lab for students. For the Manono Campus, HKATC is the only open lab available to students. Upper campus students have access to computers in Mookini Library and other labs in addition to TLC.

The Overall health call for Computer Lab usage is cautionary based on the following data.

DEMAND for Computer Lab use:

Strengths

Demand is healthy.

EFFICIENCY for Computer Lab use:

Weaknesses

Efficiency is unhealthy

EFFECTIVENESS for Computer Lab Use

Strengths

Effectiveness is healthy.

Qualitative Analysis of TLC and HKATC

Hale Kea Advancement and Testing Center (HKATC) has shown a steady increase in providing testing services specifically to Distance Education (DE) students and more generally (i.e., not just DE) to students using the Center even though the enrollment has declined.

Continued increase and overwhelming demand for testing services may result in compromising HKATC's resources, services, and facilities, as well as the health and well-being of the professional staff. Two professional staff must work overtime and come in even when sick to administer testing services.  This is especially true at peak times during the semester (mid-term, finals, etc.). Because there are special testing protocols to follow, the responsibility lies heavily on these two staff members.  They must also carefully manage the scheduling for testing request since only 20 computers are available for this use.  Staff members report high levels of stress and burn out.

HKATC, even with two professional staff members and student workers (including two tutors that do the work of the clerks when not tutoring) has attempted to meet the increased demand for its use a Computer Lab for the Manono Campus. However this substantial increase in computer usage has caused overcrowding, accelerated aging of computer equipment, escalating printing costs, increased noise level, problems with management of the adjacent electronic classroom, and more students needing technological assistance from staff.

Assessment

For tutoring, Unit Outcome #1 was assessed at the end of Fall 2012.

 For testing, Unit Outcome #4 was assessed at the end of Fall 2012. 100 surveys were collected.

 Action Plan

  1. Support HKATC's testing and computer lab access demand with additional human resources
  2. Support TLC/ HKATC's computer lab demand with additional financial resources 
  3. Fund pilot tutor mentoring project

Resource Implications

  1. Fund a permanent APT Band A
  2. Replace old computers and printers, install a system to charge for printing, and update new programs and software
  3. Fund two math tutors to be mentors for a remedial/developmental math (ABCD) course

Edwin H. Mookini Library

Mookini Library is a joint use facility between Hawai‘i Community College and UH Hilo and is located in East Hawai‘i  on the upper campus in Hilo.  The library houses books, periodicals, DVDs, microforms, government documents, and other resources on three floors.  In addition to print resources, Mookini Library provides access to online subscription databases, including EBSCOhost, Science Direct, and JSTOR.

The library has a Hawaiian Collection with access to Hawaiian monographs, maps, and Hawaiian language newspapers on microfilm.  There are over 100 PCs located on all floors that have access to the internet and Microsoft Office 2013 programs.  The library provides reference assistance and library instruction sessions to help students find, evaluate, and use information.   The library also provides group study rooms for students to have a space to collaborate on projects.  Some of these study rooms are equipped with computers with internet access and Microsoft Office Suite.

While all librarians and library staff assist Hawai‘iCC students and faculty, one Public Services librarian is assigned as the Hawai‘i Community College liaison (Hawai‘iCC librarian).  The Hawai‘iCC librarian communicates with faculty to ensure there are materials to support the curriculum by soliciting suggestions for resources when budget permits and getting feedback when deciding to cancel subscriptions.  The Hawai‘iCC librarian regularly attends Academic Support meetings and is notified of new programs.UHCC Common Student Learning Outcome: “The student will evaluate information and its sources critically.”

In addition to the UH CC Common Student Learning Outcome, Mookini Library has student learning goals and outcomes which were developed using different standards, including the Association of College and Research Libraries’ (ACRL) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. These additional goals reflect the entire process of information literacy.

Quantitative Analysis of Mookini Library

DEMAND data:

Demand is healthy.

EFFICIENCY data:

Efficiency is healthy.

EFFECTIVENESS data:

Student data gathered

Faculty Library Instruction data gathered

Effectiveness is healthy.

Qualitative Analysis of Mookini Library

Many students are not using the library.  While those students who had an opinion of the library rated it highly, students with no opinion of the library made up 15-30% of the responses, with the lowest percentage for finding articles.  This seems to suggest that many students are not using library services.  Several of the comments support this as students indicated that they had no opinion because they had not used the library.

Student survey comments also show that Library instruction sessions need to take into account students who are at different levels of information literacy or who have been though the library with another class.  Some students have either been on a library tour before or are already comfortable using the library.  It can be difficult to keep the sessions fresh for those who have visited the library with other classes while presenting necessary information for those students who have not had the opportunity in the past.

External Factors Affecting Mookini Library

Assessment

Many English 100 classes are taught information literacy skills through a library program in Laulima, the University of Hawai‘i course management system.  Participating classes visit the library twice.  A pretest is administered as a benchmark during the first session and a final quiz is given to test student learning during a second library session.  Students read the modules and complete module quizzes on their own time between the two scheduled library sessions.  Modules teach students about different types of information, searching databases, using Hawai‘i Voyager (the UH system library catalog), and evaluating and citing sources.  Quiz scores are generally incorporated into the students' English course grade.

The library also administers the UHCC Library Satisfaction Measurement Common Survey to students who attended library instruction sessions.  The students surveyed are just a sample of those using library services.

The library also surveys faculty who have participated in the library instruction program for feedback on the effectiveness of the program and suggested improvements at least once during the academic year, with the majority of faculty surveyed in the fall.

Assessment Results

69% of the 363 students enrolled in classes that assigned the library Laulima modules completed the library program in Laulima by passing all module quizzes with at least 80% and taking the final quiz.  Of these students who completed the program, 87% scored at least a 70% on the Final Quiz.  The data shows that a majority of students who complete the modules are able to successfully take the final quiz.

Other assessment results are reported under the Effectiveness Indicator.

Action Plan

  1. Strengthen subject liaison activity through outreach to  departments to tailor collections and library services to meet student and faculty needs
  2. Develop new instructional methods that promote critical thinking skills and information literacy
  3. Contribute to efforts to strengthen the P-20 education pipeline by working with area high school librarians to develop the information literacy skills and reading habits their students will need for college and beyond.

Resource Implications

None reported.

West Hawai’i Library and Learning Center (WH LLC)

WH LLC services faculty and staff who are based at the UH Center, West Hawaii, in Kealakakua, and students living in the general area of West Hawaii (Kau – Kohala). The Center supports all Hawaii Community College students taking classes in West Hawaii. It also supports other local students taking classes or programs through distance education from other University of Hawaii community colleges and universities. In less than 2,500 square feet, the Library and Learning Center supports the library, testing, and tutoring needs of students and instructors in West Hawaii.

The mission of the WH LLC is to provide services and resources to help students succeed in their classes. The Library & Learning Center is an environment that encourages active but independent learning. The staff seeks to personalize instruction while helping students build confidence and insight into their own learning experience.

Quantitative Analysis of WH LLC

DEMAND data:

Number of informational and reference questions per student and faculty FTE and Number of web accessible computers per student FTE were past Demand data elements no longer used in 2012-2013.

EFFICIENCY data:

EFFECTIVENESS data:

The West Hawai‘i Library uses a common Student Learning Outcome (SLO) that was determined by all of the UHCC libraries: the student will evaluate information and its sources critically.  2012-2013 is the first year there is any data to use in discussion about this and the sample is very small.  The Comprehensive Review describes how WH LLC supports the three ILOs

Qualitative Analysis of WH LLC

The library provides adequate resources to meet students’ needs.  It provides instruction to promote skills needed to find and evaluate resources.  Because of its small size, the library staff gets to know many students and faculty on an individual basis, which makes the staff more approachable when seeking assistance.  The small size can be problematic as well, at times it is too noisy for people to study, take test, and to work without distractions

External Factors Affecting WH LLC

Action Plan WH LLC

  1. Improve Laulima Informational Literacy Competency(ILC) unit and promote the incorporation of the ILC into all Center based courses as appropriate.
  2. Review the PRIMO research discovery option and promote to students and faculty if it is working.
  3. Design a way to evaluate student information literacy that is evidence based.

Information for the following is also being provided as part of the Academic Support Unit Executive Summary Annual Review.

Individual Annual Reviews are available on HawaiiCC Website

Academic and Administrative Support

Academic & Administrative Support provides assistance to the VCAA in the review of HawCC policies. Another way Academic & Administrative Support provides assistance is to the faculty through the maintenance and oversight of HawCC's eCAFE, the student evaluation process, which is administered by the UH System ITS Office.

Quantitative Analysis

Assessment

There are 3 unit outcomes:

  1. Academic & Administrative Support makes announcements in a timely manner regarding HawCC faculty and lecturers participating in eCAFE.
  2. Academic & Administrative Support makes edits in a timely manner to the HawCC database of eCAFE for faculty and lecturers participating in eCAFE.
  3. Twenty percent (20%) of HawCC policies are new or have been revised by the end of each academic year.

Assessment Results

Action Plan

Resource Implications

None reported.

Catalog Support

This unit assists with the production of the College's annual catalog by compiling information from other units and departments regarding policies, programs, and courses.  This unit maintains the course database in Banner, from which classes are scheduled.  This unit trains clerical staff on the proper procedures to follow to create CRNs for class scheduling.

Quantitative Analysis

Although there are no system-wide data gathered for this subunit, demand, effectiveness and efficiency indicators have been determined as healthy.

Assessment

There were no outcomes as of June 30, 2013 therefore there are no assessment results for this time period.

Action Plan

Resource Implications

None reported.

Data Technology Support

The Data Technology Support Unit (DTSU) is a new subunit under Academic Support which was established on July 1, 2013. The Data Technology Support Unit provides the college's faculty, staff and administration with data technology solutions.

Quantitative Analysis

Although there are no system-wide data gathered for this subunit, demand, effectiveness and efficiency indicators have been determined as healthy.

Assessment

There were no outcomes as of June 30, 2013 therefore, there are no assessment results for this time period.

Action Plan

Resource Implications

None reported.

Institutional Assessment

The Institutional Assessment Office provides coordination, training and consultation for the instructional programs and support units to facilitate assessment activities. The office provides professional development opportunities through the creation of instructional resources and organization of training sessions. Consultation with individuals, programs, departments and open sessions provide assistance with assessment efforts.

Quantitative Analysis

Although there are no system-wide data gathered for this subunit, demand, effectiveness and efficiency indicators have been determined as healthy.

Assessment

The unit has 3 outcomes:

  1. provides training and support to develop, align, and assess institutional, unit, program and course outcomes.
  2. maintains and publishes assessment documentation and reports.
  3. collaborates with administrators, divisions/departments/units leadership and faculty/staff to provide assessment activities that foster continuous improvement.

Assessment Results

To gather peer evaluation evidence, two surveys were conducted, the first during the Fall 2012 semester and the second during the Spring 2013 semester. The polls were by invitation but the results were received anonymously.

Action Plan

Resource Implications

Purchase of tablets (equipment).

Institutional Research

The Institutional Research Office (HawCC IRO) provides Hawaii Community College with information to support institutional planning, academic program development, and data driven decision making. The office also responds to ad hoc requests for institutional data.     

Quantitative Analysis

Although there are no system-wide data gathered for this subunit, demand, effectiveness and efficiency indicators have been determined as healthy.

Assessment

The unit has 3 outcomes:

  1. The IR Office will communicate a clear process for requesting data, information, and services to the campus.
  2. The IR Office will provide data, training, and support to the College for Annual and Comprehensive Program & Unit Reviews.
  3. The IR Office provides data and information to the campus.

Assessment Results

Unit Outcome #1 was assessed, using a Satisfaction Survey.  The planned assessment strategy for the IR Office this year was to evaluate responses from the previous survey, make improvements as needed to office processes in order to refine best practices, and communicate those changes out to the college.  Following the communication about what the office would be doing differently based on the satisfaction survey results, the office will refine the survey if needed and resurvey.  The improved survey was sent out to 20 contacts (including the entire admin team in support of annual program and unit review planning, training, and data delivery) that had requested data and or services from the IR office in the last full year.

There were only 9 respondents to the survey and it was determined too small of a pool from which to draw conclusions.

Action Plan

Resource Implications

None were reported.

Instructional Technology Support Office

The Hawai‘iCC Instructional Technology Support Office (ITSO) is part of the Academic Support Unit reporting directly to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. ITSO provides support to Hawai‘iCC faculty teaching distance education classes.  ITSO services include:

Quantitative Analysis

DEMAND

Demand is healthy.

EFFICIENCY

No data measures related to ITSO in the ASU ARPD.  Please see Other Data section below for additional measures used to determine this health call.

Efficiency is healthy.

EFFECTIVENESS

Effectiveness is healthy.

ADDITIONAL Indicators to Determine an Overall Healthy score

In addition to the data measures from the ASU’s ARPD discussed in the sections above, the following statistics support an overall healthy call for the unit.

External Factors Affecting ITSO

Assessment

ITSO has 3 unit outcomes:

  1. ITSO will provide Laulima training to support faculty in integrating current instructional technology into the curriculum.
  2. ITSO will provide administration, faculty and staff clear and current policy and procedural information about distance education.
  3. ITSO will support students in their online courses by facilitating Laulima orientations.

Assessment Results

In April 2013, ITSO distributed an anonymous, web-based survey to all instructional faculty members at the college to identify to what extent ITSO services have been accessed this year, and the effect ITSO support has had on online course development and/or delivery.  This survey included questions repeated from a survey ITSO conducted in April 2012 that was sent only to faculty or staff members who worked with ITSO during that academic year.

Action Plan

Addressing Concern #1:  Lack of Rigor and Assessment in Online Courses

Addressing Concern #2: Managing Changing Technology

Addressing Concern #3: Workshop  Scheduling

Addressing Concern #4:  Student Support

  1. ITSO has developed a course template (and has asked faculty to use it) to create a standard use of Laulima tools so that students aren’t having to learn how to use a new set of tools in every online course.  However, not all faculty members have chosen to use the template.  Where they are, students who are evaluated say that the template helps ease the experience of learning.  ITSO will attempt to further encourage widespread adoption of the template.
  2. ITSO checked with the Learning Centers about available Laulima support.  The Learning Center (TLC) and the West Hawai‘i Library and Learning Center offer Laulima Support.
  3. Despite dropping attendance in Laulima Orientations in the first week of class, ITSO expanded its hours for these sessions.
  4. ITSO is now conducting workshops during the summer (one per month June-August) in both East and West Hawai‘i in conjunction with mandatory student orientations to help communicate the challenges of online learning as a way to help students self-assess online course readiness.

The survey will be revised for 2014 by replacing the question “How could ITSO better help you to use technology to educational purposes?” with two new open-ended questions to help focus responses. These questions will be given to all faculty members who identify that they are teaching using online or hybrid delivery:

  1. “Give specific ways that ITSO has helped you to improve your online/hybrid teaching.”
  2. “What could ITSO do to further support you in improving the quality of the design or delivery of your online/hybrid courses?”

Resource Implications