University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Academic Support Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

Select the desired review year, college, and program from the drop down menus. Once a program has been selected, the results will be displayed.

Review Year: College: Program:

College: Windward Community College
Program: Academic Support Services

Printer Friendly

PDF PDF

The last comprehensive review for this program was on NA, and can be viewed at:
NA

Program Description

Academic Support includes the Library, The Testing Center, Computing Services, Media/Duplication Services, and Writing/Mathematics/Speech labs (the Language Arts and Mathematics Departments are responsible for their own labs even though the labs come under the KaPiko Student Success Center which is housed in the Library and in Akoakoa.)

LIBRARY

The College community will have access to and successfully use a variety of information sources from both within the library and worldwide for their academic, professional, intellectual and personal development.

Student Learning Outcome

             The student will evaluate information and its sources critically.

Services

·       Information resources, including books, journals, and reference and periodical databases

·       Formal instruction: guided library tours and orientations; course and assignment-related instruction; information literacy and research skills tutorials

·       Informal instruction:  reference consultations; informational, directional and technical assistance; self-guided tours; instruction by telephone and email, and pathfinders.

·       Reference services:  assistance with finding, evaluating and using information in all formats; orientation, ready reference, and referral services; help with citing sources

·       Research services: walk-in, by appointment, in person, telephone and e-mail

·       Technical assistance: Computer hardware; software; campus network accounts; e-mail; remote access; printing; copiers

·       Access services: lending; renewals, course reserves; interlibrary loan, document delivery and other consortium services

Resources

CATALOGED MATERIALS

Titles 6/10a

Titles 6/11

Titles 6/12

Volumes 6/10a

Volumes 6/11

Volumes 6/12

Books

36,431

36,754

37,020

42,807

43,119

43,358

Pamphlets

1,533

1,539

1,277

3,083

3,093

2,739

Kits

43

43

45

50

50

54

Audiotapes

32

32

32

39

39

39

Phonorecords

31

31

31

34

34

34

Compact discs

229

231

232

271

273

274

Maps and Globes

397

401

401

428

432

432

Slides (sets)

2

2

2

3

3

3

Art prints and posters

226

226

226

230

230

230

Games

5

5

5

5

5

5

Videotapes

634

639

622

828

838

819

Digital Video Discs (DVD)

1,259

1,298

1,360

1,460

1,507

1581

Laser Discs (CD-ROMs)

30

27

23

68

57

44

TOTAL

40,852

41,228

41,276

49,306

49,680

49,612

a Count adjusted after bibliographic and physical inventory.               

PERIODICALS

Titles 6/08

Titles 6/09

Titles 6/10

Titles 6/11

Titles 6/12

Current periodicals, purchased

121

108

97

86

90

   Paper

120

107

94

82

86

   Electronic

1

1

3

4

4

Current periodicals received but not purchased (free, gifts)

14

14

14

14

14

Inactive periodicals

49

62

42

53

36

Microfilm only

1

1

1

4

4

Total periodicals                                18

185

184

154

153

144

                                                       

OTHER MATERIALS

Reels 6/08

Reels 6/09

Reels 6/10

Reels 6/11

Reels 6/12

Microfilm reels

   1,871

1,697

1,705

1,705

1,705

Electronic Titles purchased via the UH Libraries consortium (EBSCOHost, ScienceDirect, ebrary databases)

 

Number of Databases

Journals in Databases

Other Titles in Databases (reports, newswires, etc.)

Electronic books (ebrary)

Total E-Titles (excluding databases)

2007-08

19

9,487

13,958

37,700

61,145

2008-09

28

11,705

13,021

44,511

69,237

2009-10

37

               11,561

11,896

49,971

73,428

2010-11

34

               12,120

11,304

70,233

93,657

2011-12

34

13,522

19,777

78,662

98,439

Electronic Titles directly purchased by Windward CC

 

Number of Databases

Journals in Databases + individual titles

Electronic books

Total E-Titles (excluding databases)

2007-08

 

na

2

7,349

2008-09

 

1,928

2

9,904

2009-10

 

1,987

4

1,991

2010-11

7

503

2,109

2,605

2011-12

9

489

2,179

2,668

Equipment

Equipment

Qty

Notes

Desktop computer

30

9 Macs and 21 PCs, including 4 express stations

Laptop computer

6

2 Macs and 4 PCs for use in building

Laptop computer

12

Older computers, semester loans

Printer

3

2 B&W, 1 color

Scanner

3

1 document scanner, 2 flatbed scanners

TV Monitor

4

 

VCR player

2

 

DVD player

2

 

Filmstrip/cassette player

1

 

Slide/cassette player

1

 

Cassette player

2

 

Photocopier

1

B&W, charge of $.10 per copy

Microfilm reader/printer

2

Microfiche lens also available

Fax

1

Send only, local calls

Supply table

1

Paper cutter, pencil sharpener, hole punch, stapler

Library Staff

FTE

Category

Position

Name

1.0

Faculty

Head Librarian

Nancy Heu

1.0

Faculty

Instruction Librarian

Tara Severns

1.0

Faculty

Reference Librarian/

Cataloger

Mariko Kershaw)

1.0

Faculty

Access Services/ Reference Librarian

Diane Sakai   

1.0

Civil Service

Library Technician V – Circulation

Diane Teramoto

1.0

Civil Service

Library Technician V – Technical Services

Genevieve Mero

1.0

Civil Service

Library Assistant IV – Periodicals/ISL

Gertrude Miyaji

THE TESTING CENTER

The Testing Center provides testing services to the College, the University of Hawai‘isystem, and the community.

Outcome:  The Testing Center provides assessment services to the college and the community in a secure and friendly testing environment.

Until the new Library Learning Commons opened in August 2012, The Testing Center was in small quarters — one-room — not conducive to testing.  In this one room without dividers are file and storage cabinets, the reception area and the 21 testing stations, Testing Center coordinator desk, student proctor desk, and a desk for an emergency hire from the VCAA office who works on class scheduling, Banner maintenance, and Curriculum Central maintenance.  Space was limited for those in wheelchairs; the door to the room is also difficult to open for those with strength challenges. The coordinator is on full-time faculty member who is assisted by student employees.

COMPUTING SERVICES

Computing Services’ mission is to facilitate meeting College needs for highly-effective information technology resources, support, planning, and management.

Service Outcomes.  Computing Services assesses its achievement of the following service outcomes:

1.     Computing Services meets needs for up-to-date hardware and software in classrooms/labs and faculty/staff offices.

2.     Computing Services provides highly competent and responsive technical assistance to faculty and staff.

Services Provided.  The primary services provided by Computing Services are as follows:

1.     Develop and maintain an information technology infrastructure that supports effective teaching, learning, and decision-making.

1.1.  Provide robust wired and wireless network connectivity.

1.2.  Provide comprehensive network services.

1.3.  Provide highly-capable client systems.

1.4.  Manage the campus VoIP telephone and voice messaging systems.

2.     Provide user services that facilitate full and effective use of the college’s technology resources.

2.1.  Provide prompt and proficient help desk services.

2.2.  Provide thorough usage guides and other self-help materials.

2.3.  Provide timely technology training and personalized mentoring to faculty and staff.

3.     Contribute information technology perspectives and expertise to cross-functional planning efforts and projects.

3.1.  Actively contribute to institutional planning and governance.

3.2.  Partner with other units to develop and implement new or enhanced materials, courses, programs, and events.

4.     Develop and maintain the ability of the Computing Services unit to fulfill its mission.

4.1.  Secure adequate Computing Services staffing and funding, and manage these resources appropriately.

4.2.  Enhance the knowledge and skills of Computing Services staff.

4.3.  Adopt efficient and effective operational tools and procedures.

Number and Description of Staff.  In AY2011-2012, the professional positions within Computing Services were staffed as follows:

·      1.0 FTE, Computing Services Coordinator, Pos. No. 87039:  Michael Tom

·      1.0 FTE, IT Specialist (Band B), Pos. No. 79990:  Bryan Tokuda

·      1.0 FTE, IT Specialist (Band A), Pos. No. 78187:  Jo Ann Takamiyashiro from 08/01/11

·      1.0 FTE, IT Specialist (Band A), Pos. No. 78345:  Susan Ma until 10/31/11; Michael McIntosh from 11/28/11 (casual hire) and 5/15/12 (permanent)

One staff position was essentially vacant for the entire academic year:  (The Computing Services vacancy provided funding for the casual hire of Woody Garrison who was assigned to the Media Center during the prolonged medical leave and recovery of a Media staff member.)

·      1.0 FTE, IT Specialist (Band B), Pos. No. 79977:  Vacant

Student Worker Hours.  Computing Services had one student employee who worked a total of 1030.75 hours in AY2011-2012:

·      Computing Services Assistant (A3):  Helena Morris.  231 hours in Fall 2011, 312.5 hours in Spring 2012, 487.25 hours in Summer 2012.

MEDIA/DUPLICATION

Media Center Mission:  The mission of the Media Center is to provide up-to-date media technology and efficient and congenial services to sustain and support the effective learning environment of the College. The Media Center provides the faculty with the instructional materials and presentation means to deliver timely and relevant instruction in the liberal arts.

The media Center provides a wide range of services that include graphic production, purchase and maintenance of classroom equipment, training of faculty in use of the equipment, duplication, equipment loans, the set-up of equipment for functions scheduled by the community college and outside agencies, and distance education support.

Operational hours per week

Open hours of operation for media are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm Monday through Friday for a total of 40 hours per week.  Open hours of operation for duplication services are 8:00 am to 6:00 Monday and Tuesday 8 am to 4 pm Wednesday to Friday for a total of 44 hours per week.

Names and positions of staff 2011-12:

FTE

Category

Status

Position

Name

1.0

Faculty

Mar 92-present

Media Specialist

Elizabeth Ratliff

1.0

APT

Aug 94-present

Electronics Technician II

Michael Bowles

1.0

APT

Feb 11-present

Distance Education Technician

Sydney W. Garrison

1.0

Civil Service

Jun 06-present

Office Assistant III

Sandra Carmichael

The Media Center employed 5 students, one who took on extra duties while the Office Assistant was out, and two who worked primarily in duplication and media production. The two remaining student assistants worked primarily for our Electronic Technician helping to answer classroom emergencies in a timely manner, clean and inventory classroom equipment as well as perform simple equipment setups.

KA PIKO STUDENT SUCCESS CENTER (Writing Lab, Speech Lab, and Math Lab, Supplemental Instruction, Assistive Technology)

The Ka Piko Student Success Center is a combination of academic and student affairs units designed to "assist and empower students to achieve academic and personal goals through a support network of peer and professional tutoring and guidance, study group facilitation, workshops and individual assistance aimed at helping students develop into lifelong learners." The writing, speech and math labs are supervised by the Office of Academic Affairs. The other services, including Supplementary Instruction and TRiO tutoring fall under Student Affairs and are funded through federal grants.

The Speech Lab: During the lab hours, students (not just speech students) are able to rehearse speeches and receive feedback, learn to use visual aids during the speech, and receive assistance in their speech outlines. It is manned by two student lab assistants (student employees) and supervised by the Mary Jane Lewis, the speech instructor. The lab was open for a total of 10 hours per week during the fall and spring semesters.

The Writing Center: Resource teachers (Mary Segura and Leslie Lyum, Spring 2012) provided supplemental material and instruction in the writing process, provided feedback on drafts (in person and via email). The lab was open in fall 2011 six hours per week and in spring 2012 eight hours per week. Regular hours were not available since the resource teachers were on assigned time. There is no regular staffing for the lab.

The Math Lab: One faculty member is assigned 1-2 credits to supervise math tutors and and manage the lab. The tutors provide drop-in assistance to students at all levels of mathematics. The average weekly tutor availability was 45 hours.

Supplementary Instruction:This is a peer facilitated, group study seesion which addresses high-risk gatekeeper courses. The goal is to increase student success at Windward. This is one of the Achieving the Dream strategies employed by Windward. A Supplemental Instruction Coordinator supervises at 15 to 28 SI leaders who serviced 70 section of 18 to 20 different courses during the last year.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Academic Support Services Program Health:
Not Yet Applied
Student and Faculty Information Program Year  
09-10 10-11 11-12
1 Annual Unduplicated Student Headcount     3,537  
2 Annual FTE Faculty     65
2a Annual FTE Staff     93
3 Annual FTE Student     1,384

Library Overall Health Call: Not Yet Applied
Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
4 Number of informational and reference questions per student and faculty FTE     4.0 Not Yet Applied
5 Number of students attending presentations sessions per student FTE     1.3
6 Number of circulations, electronic books used, full-text journal articles downloaded per student and faculty FTE     21.0
7 Number of web accessible computers per student FTE     0.0
Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
8 Number of informational and reference questions answered per FTE librarian     4.2 Not Yet Applied
9 Number of book volumes per student FTE     86
10 Total materials expenditures per student FTE     $37
11 Total library expenditures per student and faculty FTE     $380
Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
12 Common Student Learning Outcome: The student will evaluate information and its sources critically     73 Not Yet Applied
13 Student and faculty satisfaction measurements using common survey questions     90

Tutoring Services Overall Health Call: Not Yet Applied
Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
14 Number of students tutored per student FTE     4.0 Not Yet Applied
15 Number of students who placed in Dev/Ed through COMPASS per student FTE     1.4
Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
16 Tutor contact hours per tutor paid hours     0 Not Yet Applied
17 Student contact hours per tutor paid hours     0
18 Number of sessions per tutor paid hours     0
19 Tutoring Budget per student contact hours     $0
Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
20 Common Student Learning Outcome: Students who receive tutoring will pass their tutored course.     67 Not Yet Applied
Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) Survey Year
  2010 2012
21 4.h. Tutored or taught other students (paid or voluntary)
  Very Often     4.00
  Often     5.20
  Sometimes     22.60
  Never     68.10
22 13.d. Peer or other tutoring (frequency, satisfaction, importance)
  Frequencey     14.30
  Satisfaction     2.39
  Importance     52.50
23 13.e. Skill labs (writing, math, etc.) (frequency, satisfaction, importance)
  Frequencey     13.50
  Satisfaction     2.27
  Importance     51.60

Testing Services Overall Health Call: Not Yet Applied
Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
24 Number of placement tests administered per year per student FTE     1.0 Not Yet Applied
25 Number of Distance Learning tests administered per year per student FTE     2.8
26 Local campus tests proctored per year per student FTE     3.1
Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
27 Testing seats per student FTE     0.0 Not Yet Applied
28 Testing seats per total number of tests     0.0
29 Total number of tests per Testing Budget     $0
Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
30 Satisfaction measurements using common survey questions     94 Not Yet Applied

Technology Resources Overall Health Call: Not Yet Applied
Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
31 Number of online courses per year per total number of courses (live and online)     10% Not Yet Applied
32 Number of student, faculty and staff computers per IT desktop support staff     200.6
33 Number of technology workshops for faculty per faculty FTE     0.1
34 Number of technology workshops for staff per staff FTE     0.1
35 Number of technology workshops for students per student FTE     0
Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
36 Average response time for Help Desk calls     0.5 Not Yet Applied
37 Average processing time for work orders     1
38 Total number of computers per Computer Services Budget     $312
Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
Common survey questions Not Yet Applied
39 1) I am satisfied with the customer service of the Help Desk/computer services staff.     4
40 2) I am satisfied with the response time of the Help Desk/computer services staff.     4
41 3) The computers on campus meet my needs.     4
42 4) I am satisfied with the quality of work of the instructional design faculty and staff.     0
Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) Survey Year
  2010 2012
43 4.j. Used the Internet or instant messaging to work on an assignment
  Very Often     47.80
  Often     27.00
  Sometimes     18.60
  Never     6.60
44 9.g. Using computers in academic work
  Very Much     48.30
  Quite a Bit     36.80
  Some     11.00
  Very Little     3.90
45 12.g. Using computing and information technology
  Very Much     25.30
  Quite a Bit     40.00
  Some     23.40
  Very Little     11.30
46 13.h. Computer lab
  Frequency     1.69
  Satisfaction     2.41
  Importance     2.31

Last Updated: December 21, 2012
Glossary

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Library Services

Strengths

The Library provides a range of resources and services that support the curriculum.  Resources include print and audiovisual collections, and 24/7 remote access to ebook, journal and reference databases.  Librarians provide reference, information, technical and instruction services.  Instruction services include the Library Research Unit that helps students learn to locate and evaluate information sources, and provides customized class instruction in particular topics, such as Narrowing Your Topic, Literature Types, and discipline or assignment-specific information resources. In addition, the library collaborates with instructors to create online library guides <http://guides.wcc.hawaii.edu> help students locate information resources in their discipline areas.

The service-oriented staff members take pride in their work and are committed to taking the initiative in providing library patrons with assistance. They take the time and make an effort to build rapport with students and faculty. The library has recently developed a customer service training program for student assistants. Survey results have been consistently favorable regarding library services.

The library strengthened its Hawaiian Collection thanks to $5,000 in legislative funding to purchase additional copies and new material.

Weaknesses

Staffing: The main weakness in the library is the lack of staffing to adequately provide services needed in the new Library Learning Commons, which is approximately 69,000 square feet compared to the old building of 7,800 square feet

1. Head Librarian (faculty) - position vacant as of 1/1/2013:It is imperative that the operations of the library be continued with the retirement of the Head Librarian in January 2013. This position provides the leadership for all library operations including instruction, resource allocation, strategic planning, staffing, program development and evaluation of library resources and services.  The position plans for and responds to student, faculty and technology needs and represents the library on campus and in the University of Hawaii system. The position is also responsible for building security and facility needs of the units in the Library Learning Commons.

2.  Additional student help funds:  To keep the Library Learning Commons open until 10:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday evenings during fall and spring semesters and, most importantly, to provide security for the building, additional student help hours are required.    

The Library Learning Commons is in an experimental year of being open until 10:00 p.m. during the fall 2012 and spring 2013 semesters.  These expanded hours are intended to provide students a safe, quiet environment to study, write papers, and prepare projects. This service is crucial for students who do not have their own computers or who need quiet places to study. Students with parents also find the Library a quiet study area for their children as well, allowing both to take advantage of the supportive learning environment. The later hours also afford the College opportunities to hold evening events such as the recent “Out Loud in the Library.” This attracted 103 people, many of whom stayed past 8:30 p.m. to discuss the evening’s event, explore the library, or get back to their studies. The expanded hours satisfy the request for later hours from students on every library survey we have conducted. Currently, the Library experiences difficulty keeping a sufficient number of student help to adequately staff the Circulation Desk during all hours of operation. Furthermore, closing procedures take twice as long as in the old building because of the size and complexity of the new building.

The Testing Center

Strengths

The Testing Center saw an increase in numbers of students served in the administration of placement and distance learning tests.  The Testing Center continues to provide services at a consistent or possibly at a higher level as the number of students have increased in proportion to the number of exams proctored. This increase in number of placement tests administered continues to be a direct result of the UH System replacing the old policy in order to allow unlimited retesting sessions.In addition to students taking the placement test for the first-time, 192 students have retested as of June 30, 2012.

As the chart below shows there has been a significant increase in the number of distance learning (online/cable) and local campus courses.

 

Online

Cable

Courses Offered Total

Fall 2008

0

3

261

Spring 2009

4

1

241

Summer 2009

1

0

35

Fall 2009

14

1

308

Spring 2010

13

2

306

Summer 2010

5

0

48

Fall 2010

25

1

335

Spring 2011

26

2

311

Summer 2011

16

0

64

Fall 2011

41

2

377

Spring 2012

34

3

357

Summer 2012

18

0

78

 
Beginning in July 2011 the Testing Center also proctored 89 Tests of  Adult Basic Education (TABE) for potential students of the Ready Set Grow Hawai‘i and the Certified Nurse’s Aide (CNA) programs for the Office of Continuing and Community Education. While the increased number of students serviced (including testing for distance education courses) can be viewed as a strength, staffing for the increased numbers has remained the same.
 
Efficiency measures have remained consistent in Testing seats per student FTE and increased in Testing seats per total number of tests.  At the end of May 2011, the Testing Center Manager (an APT position) retired, and a faculty position was reassigned to Division I, Academic Support, to serve as the Testing Center Coordinator.

All satisfaction indicators continue to remain high (over 90%).  Three of the five indicators increased over last year.  One indicator is new, and the indicator relating to hours of operation has remained constant at 92% for the past three years, lower than the other indicators.  Hours of operation (52/week) are on par with or exceed those of similar-sized and some larger-sized UHCC campuses.

A possible reason for the increase in the indicators is the creation of a secondary testing site for computer-based exams during the fall and spring final exam weeks, which eliminated long wait lists where students had to sit on the tile floor in the hallway outside the Testing Center in Alaka`i 106 during the peak hours.  This plan came about through the efforts of the Dean, Division II, locating and booking an available classroom and Computing Services setting up and locking down the laptop computers.

Faculty need the Testing Center as a secure, safe, and calm place for their classes to take tests outside of class hours.  The Testing Center staff makes every effort to accommodate faculty requests.

Weaknesses:

Proctoring for all exams (local campus and distance learning exams for the System and out-of-state schools) continues to require a significant amount of resources to process. The Testing Center staff (one coordinator and student help) complete a complicated process that is necessary to ensure the integrity of the testing situation.

The Testing Center was in small quarters — one-room — not conducive to testing. Distractions include loud hallway conversations during class changes, phone conversations, and face-to-face conversation at the reception desk.  During peak times, (before semesters begin and during mid-terms and finals) there have been occasions when students were wait-listed.  Space is limited for those in wheelchairs; the door to the room is also difficult to open for those with strength challenges.  These issues have been alleviated with the move to the Library Learning Commons (LLC) in August 2012.

 

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

Hours of operation per week during

 

 

 

       Fall/Spring

52

52

52

       Summer

40

40

40

Number and description of staff

1.0 APT

1.0 APT

1.0 Faculty

Number of student help hours during

 

 

 

       Fall/Spring

50

50

60

       Summer

30

30

40

 

To maintain the integrity of the Testing Center, new student help hires necessitate individualized training.  This includes customer service and a review of Testing Center policies/procedures.  While relying on student help — a challenge to hire and retain — to keep the Testing Center open and flowing smoothly, it generally meets the needs of the students and faculty.  Both groups experience a well-monitored, -proctored, and -maintained space that is conducive to testing. 

Students and those from the community need a testing center that is available as many hours as possible during the week and is staffed with people who quickly and professionally get them set up to take the test and, with composure, respond to technical difficulties.

Computing Services

Strengths:

The Computing Services team is highly cohesive and highly dedicated to meeting the technology needs of the College and its faculty, staff, and students.  Staff members have been willing to extend themselves beyond assigned responsibilities and normal work hours to satisfy short-notice resource requests, to resolve any technology difficulties faculty encounter whether at the college or at home, and to contribute technical expertise to any Windward initiative.  Computing Services is creative in drawing on limited resources to meet as many needs as possible, and the unit continuously strives to improve its services and the productivity of its users.

Weaknesses:

The workload demands on Computing Services have been barely manageable, and they continue to mushroom due to rapid growth of the college’s IT infrastructure (up from 688 computers in August 2010, to 833 in August 2011, and 925 in August 2012) and the addition of new responsibilities such as managing the VoIP phone system and performing all telephone adds/moves/changes.  Numerous strategic projects, such as implementing the long-ago purchased KACE and Fortinet systems, have had to be delayed simply to keep up with user requests, and Computing Services staff are periodically struggling with burnout from constant “firefighting”.  While increased staffing in AY2012-2013 will bring some relief (the vacant IT Specialist PBB position will be filled and a second student employee will be hired), it’s also critical that Computing Services increase team productivity through training that raises skill levels and by upgrading to new tools that make it possible to accomplish more with less time and less effort.

The college’s ability to fund ongoing lifecycle replacement of computing equipment is uncertain.  One-time grant funds from Title III, ARRA, and other sources have been used to equip a number of new computing facilities on campus, but no financial provisions have been made to keep those facilities up-to-date by replacing the equipment as it ages.  A $500K annual legislative allocation for equipment was effectively lost to budget cuts, and the college has since been relying on end-of-year “budget dust” to fund equipment replacement.

Computing Services lacks appropriate network security tools, expertise, policies and procedures to adequately respond to and defend against network disruptions, malicious attacks, and data breaches.  Addressing these problems will require investments in network security equipment and monitoring tools, staff training, and development of appropriate security policies and procedures.

Media/Duplication

Strengths:

Out of 45 classrooms 31 are equipped with permanent multi-media equipment.  In laboratories and older building mobile equipment is provided.  WCC is fortunate that our classroom equipment is fairly uniform, a deliberate attempt on our part to maximize efficiency in equipment training, maintenance and repair.

Weaknesses:

The primary areas of weakness are in personnel resources and funding for replacement of classroom equipment and college audio-visual resources. The operational schedule clearly does not give adequate support services for evening and weekend classes.  Staffing is a limiting factor in expanding service hours and creative scheduling for existing staff has not been supported by administration because of the small number of staff.

This department continues to advocate for key support positions that have been identified as high need for the campus.  In the last campus satisfaction survey 64% of respondents reported that they considered levels of staffing inadequate for support services. There is a need for a Web Media Specialist and Instructional Developer to support both the growing number of On-line courses and increasing use of technology in traditional classrooms. Although the Media Center was responsible for creating and maintaining the campus Website initially, lack of qualified staff has necessitated the parceling out of the web maintenance in part to other academic support units. With online course offerings being expanded and plans to start videoconferencing classes at remote sites the need to reinstate this position and provide these service is becoming critical. 

As the unit continues to grow the entrepreneurial capabilities of the Duplication and Printing Services, the Media Center has an increasing need for a separate manager for this service with experience in managing a self-supporting unit.

KaPiko Student Success Center: Tutoring

Strengths

Having several student services and academic support under one umbrella, the KaPiko Student Success Center, should make it easier or more convenient for students to receive the help in assistive technology, mental health help, testing, Supplementary Instruction, and assistance in writing, speech, and mathematics. While the idea is conceptually a best practice, the actual implementation of the center has proven to be very cumbersome and difficult. Each lab is under the supervision of the appropriate academic departments. For example, the Speech and Writing Labs are coordinated by Language Arts faculty. This could be considered a strength in that the faculty assigned to coordinate has the expertise in the discipline to ensure students are receiving quality assistance in the case of writing and speech. The tutors in the math lab are supervised by  mathemetics faculty.

The Speech lab has had a steady demand for its services despite the limited number of hours the lab is opened. Survey results indicate that students who have utilized the services are very satisified.

The Math lab has had a steady demand for its services. It appears that the number of tutor hours available is more than adequate to meet the needs of the students.

Much of the tutoring is being done by Trio, Windward's highly successful federally-funded student support program. The total number of students served was  316 and of that total 210 students passed their courses with an average of 17 hours of tutoring per student.

Supplementary Instruction, which is funded by Title III, served a total of 992 students (those who attended at least two sessions). Of these students, 69.9% were successful in their courses (success is defined as grades of C or higher).

Weaknesses

One obvious weakness is that the center is under two different units: Student Affairs (Overall Ka PIko Coordinator, SI tutoring, Assistive Technology, and Career Center Services, Financial Aid, and Employment Services) and Academic Affairs (Writing, Speech, and Mathematics Labs). This division is also reflected in the physical location of the services. All the academic labs are located now in the new Library Learning Commons. Before the move this past summer, these labs were scattered throughout the campus.

Another issue is the funding source. Most of the Student Affairs units are funded through Title III and institutionalizing the positions is questionable. For example, the designated Ka Piko Coordinator/Tutoring Coordinator is an APT employee who reports to the VC for Student Affairs whose job is:

Because of the limiting nature of federally-funded grants, sustaining this KaPiko Coordinator position will become problematic in the future. Supplementary Instruction is also funded by Title III monies and if this service is to continue, SI needs to be institutionalized.

While the writing, speech, and mathematics labs are funded through Instuctional funds, the resources teachers or coordinators receive some assigned time, but the number of credits may vary from semester to semester. Student help for the speech and mathematics labs are generally stable or have been slightly increased.

The Wrting Lab is the most problematic unit. Because the concept of a writing lab originated from Achieving the Dream Initiatives such as the KaPiko Center and reinforced by 2010 CCSSE survey results, the writing lab was not part of the Language Arts departments' goals. WCC used to have resource teachers assigned to the  Learning Center (which was dismantled when construction for the Library Learning Commons began). The department never crystallized a plan for the new LLC and the return of the resource teachers. The writing lab was quickly created when faculty from ETC were transferred to the Language Arts department. Therefore, the writing lab and its personnel has been in flux. Because of this situation, the demand for the services is not strong, the lab's effiiciency is weak, and the effectiveness of the lab is unclear.

Because of the lack of coordination all the tutoring units, efficiency data is either not avaiable or incomplete. The KaPiko Coordinator/Tutoring Coordinator would be able to consolidate the collection of data.

Part III. Action Plan

Library

1.     Secure $75,000 to fill the 1.0 FTE vacant Head Librarian position that provides the leadership for all library operations including instruction, resource allocation, strategic planning, staffing, program development and evaluation of library resources and services.  The position plans for and responds to student, faculty and technology needs and represents the library on campus and in the University of Hawaii system. The position is also responsible for building security and facility needs of the units in the Library Learning Commons.  Meets WCC outcomes 2.1, 2.4-7.

2.     Secure $8,600 for additional student help hours to keep the Library Learning Commons open until 10:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday evenings during fall and spring semesters and to provide evening security for the building.   Extended library hours to provide students a safe, quiet environment to study, write papers, prepare projects, and use computers.

3.     Secure $45,000 to fund a 1.0 FTE Access Services Manager, APT position to handle increased Circulation transactions, supervise staff in charge of Circulation and Interlibrary loans, and provide support for expanded hours and circulation services in the new building.  Meets WCC Outcomes 2.1, 2.4-7, 5.3.

4.     Secure $60,000 to fund a 1.0 FTE 11-monthfaculty Electronic Resources Specialist Librarian position to procure, license and manage databases and information management systems, and service the expanding distance education program.  Meets WCC Outcomes 2.1, 2.4-7.

5.     Secure $60,000 to fund a 1.0 FTE 11-monthfaculty Hawaiian Specialist Librarian position in order to better serve Native Hawaiian students, students pursuing an AA or ASC in Hawaiian Studies, and the growing number of students enrolled in courses with a Hawaiian/Pacific focus.  Meets WCC Outcome 1.1, 1.4-7, 5.3 and supports the Title III grant-funded initiative to expand the number of Hawaiian Studies courses.

6.     Secure $200,000 to convert the slope between the Library Learning Commons and HÅi¿½kÅ«lani Imaginarium into an amphitheater.  This outdoor facility will create a visually attractive connection between these two buildings and mitigate the hazardous nature of the steeply sloped swale. The proposed amphitheater incorporates a space for learning and teaching, safety, beautification and functionality.   This request is co-sponsored by representatives from the Imaginarium, PAi¿½likÅ« Theatre, Hale `Imiloa and Gallery `Iolani.

Testing Center

1. The move in August 2012 to the LLC with additional testing seats in a quiet room, a room with a check-in counter, a separate testing room for students who require accommodations, and improved ambience;

2. A security camera in the testing room will be installed to assure compliance with Testing Center policies.

Computing Services

Computing Services will undertake the following strategic projects in AY2012-2013 to address the weaknesses discussed in the previous section and to continue meeting technology needs at Windward. 

1. Plan and implement computing facilities in the new Library Learning Commons, in the expanded A’o building, and in the renovated No’eau and Manaleo buildings.  The Library Learning Commons will include expanded open lab capacity, additional laptops for student checkout, and a new computer classroom.  The A’o expansion and the renovated Manaleo and No’eau buildings will each be configured with 4 additional classrooms and a number of faculty offices.  Computing Services will handle the planning, ordering, and installation of network switches, UPSes, wireless access points, computer, printers, and telephones in each of these buildings.

2.  Improve Computing Services staff productivity by implementing tools that streamline or automate common tech support tasks.  Bomgar remote control software will enable Computing Services staff to see and control a faculty/staff member’s computer as they discuss a problem over the phone, rather than requiring one party to walk to the other’s office.  The Dell KACE K1000 and K2000 systems management appliances will be used to manage help desk requests, track inventory, automate software deployments, and collect assessment data.  Once fully implemented, these tools should enable Computing Services staff to accomplish more in less time while also improving service to faculty/staff with more immediate assistance and faster turnaround on work requests.

3. Improve network reliability and information security by raising Computing Services skill levels and implementing intrusion prevention systems, vulnerability scanners, and security awareness training.  Computing Services staff will pursue training in how to more astutely manage the campus network and better resolve outages and security incidents.  A Fortinet FortiGate 311B appliance will be piloted to increase network security for the numerous offices in Alaka’i that handle sensitive data.  Computing Services will also facilitate campus participation in the UH Information Security Program that calls for running vulnerability scans on servers, auditing key offices, remediating security holes, and conducting security awareness training for users.

Media/Duplication

1. Submit PBC requests for the following replacement euquipment:

Priority 1: Upgrade Alakai Classroom Smartboards, 101,102,129,130  $32,000

Priority 2: Hale Noeau Renovation AV equipment $40,060

Priority 3: Hale Manaleo Renovation AV equipment $18,760

Priority 4: Hale A'o Renovation AV equipment $14,070

Priority 5: Hale Akoakoa Audio Control System $45,000

Priority 5: Hale Palanakila control system upgrades (15 rooms) $62,475

2. Submit PBC requests for an instructional developer, web media specialist, and duplication manager.

3. Complete and implement satisfaction surveys.

Ka Piko Student Success Center: Tutoring

1. As the Dean, I will work more closely with the KaPiko Coordinator and VCSA to develop an overall plan for the smooth operation of the various units in this center. This will require the VCSA, VCAA, and me to determine whether there should be only one administrative unit in charge of KaPiko and to determine how the center will operate.

2. Administration (VCSA and VCAA) should find ways to institutionalize the KaPiko Coordinator/Tutoring Coordinator postion. The coordinator should be an 11 month faculty or an APT with experience in managing centers who can plan and implement the center operations and work closely with the Language Arts and Mathematics faculty.

3. The coordinator must ensure assessment tools and procedures are implemented so that both the unit and the administration can determine the labs' effectiveness and efficiency. Currently, some of the labs are maintaining data. The coordinator must be able to coordinate all tutoring services.

4. If labs such as writing and mathematics are effective in helping students in their courses, then Academic Affairs will need to provide consistent financial support for a mathematics lab coordinator (2-3 credits) and the support of an English resource teacher (half-time or full-time) or graduate student for the Writing lab.

5. Maintain or increase student employees (lab assistants) hours for mathematics and speech to increase the numbers of students helped.

Part IV. Resource Implications

Library
The library's requests to the PBC are:

Outcome

Means of Assessment & Criteria for Success

Implementation Date

Budget request

Dept

Priority

Tier

4.2.a. Library services, programs, resources and personnel will be smoothly and effectively administered.

4.2.a.1. Head Librarian position, vacant as of 1/1/13, will be filled.

1/1/13

$75,000

PW 1

4.1.c. Users will have adequate access to the library building.

4.1.c.2. $8,600 in student help hours will be funded to keep the library open until 10:00 p.m. Monday to Friday during fall and spring semesters.

7/2013

$8,600

OO 1

2.1.d. Users will receive prompt service from the library staff.

2.1.d.1. 1.00 FTE Access Services Manager APT will be hired to manage circulation functions, handle increased fiscal responsibilities, extend hours and services, and provide additional oversight and management of the new building.

7/2013

$45,000

PW 1

3.3.a. Users will access electronic databases to locate information.

3.3.a.4. Distance Education and other students will be better able to locate information through the services of a 1.0 FTE 11-month faculty Electronic Resources Librarian who will handle the myriad of computer and database problems, upgrades and new functionalities.

7/2013

$60,000

PW 1

3.2.a. Students will learn about specific resources that meet the needs of subject area classes.

3.2.a.2. Students will have the expert knowledge of a 1.0 FTE 11-month faculty Hawaiian Specialist Librarian who will develop and manage the Hawaiian and Pacific collections and provide bibliographic instruction and mentorship.

7/2013

$60,000

PW 1

4.1.b. Users will have access to a quiet, clean, safe, and comfortable environment.

4.1.b.3.  Amphitheater between library and Imaginarium will be completed to add learning space and safety to steep swale.

1/1/13

$200,000

CP 1

The Testing Center

No resource implications at this time.

Computing Services

Computing Services is seeking a total equipment allocation of $133,700 in AY2012-2013.  This includes $22,400 for new equipment needed in the A’o extension and the renovated Manaleo and No’eau buildings, and $111,300 for lifecycle maintenance/replacement of computing equipment.

Item Cost

Description

$22,400

(12) iMac desktop computers @ $1450; $3000 for printers; and $2,000 for (3) UPSes.  New equipment necessary to implement baseline computing functionality in the A’o extension and the renovated Manaleo and No’eau buildings.

$42,000

(30) MacBook laptops @ $1400.  Will ultimately replace obsolete laptops on Imiloa Carts.  New MacBooks may go to faculty, who would hand-down their existing laptop to the Imiloa Carts.

$43,500

(30) iMac computers @ $1450.  Replacements for Akoakoa 113 classroom PCs and Palanakila open lab PCs.

$16,800

(12) PC/Mac computers @ $1400.  Replacements for faculty/staff, who would hand-down their existing laptop for use by lecturers.

$2,500

Replacement printers; various models and prices.

$6,500

Renew service contracts for campus wireless network and Bomgar remote support system.

Media/Duplication

The Media Center’s annual base budget should increase to provide for existing essential needs

The following funding would enable significant improvements in the efficacy of the Media Center

Priority 1: 60,000/year for 1.0 FTE Instructional Developer

Priority 2: 60,000/year for 1.0 FTE Web Media Specialist

Priority 3: 48,000/year for 1.0 FTE Duplication Manager*

*This could be achieved with a less costly conversion of the existing Clerical position to an Administrative, Profession, Technical position.

Ka Piko Student Success Center: Tutoring/Resource Hours

KaPiko Student Success Center Coordinator (11-month faculty or APT, Academic Specialist, Band B):  $60,000 or $45,000

Writing Resource Teacher (9-month faculty)                                                                                              $50,004                                    

Writing Graduate Assistant:                                                                                                                          $4015

Math Center Coordinator (3 credits TE) /semester:                                                                                     $4233/semester                                              

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2011-2012 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
The student will evaluate information and its sources critically

2

Yes
Library Student Learning Outcome: English 22 & 100 students completing the required Library Research Unit will: a. When given a list of available information sources, choose the appropriate sources & describe search strategies for locating the needed information. b. When given the URL for a Web page, access the page, identify the site’s title and author, its publication or posting date, and evaluate key characteristics about the site in terms of the information need, including timeliness, point-of-view, scope, and authority or credibility. c. When given access to a particular information search tool, identify appropriate key words and identify search strings that are focused and appropriately use phrase searching and Boolean operators.

3

Yes
Testing Center: The Testing Center provides assessment services to the college and the community in a secure and friendly testing environment.

4

Yes
Computing Services: 1. Meet the needs for up-to-date hardware and software in classrooms/labs and faculty/staff offices.

5

Yes
Computing Services: 2. Provides highly competent and responsive technical assistance to faculty and staff.

A) Expected Level Achievement

Library: At least 75% of the students taking the tests will correctly answer selected questions that relate to the three stated learning outcomes

Testing Center:  90% of respondents will indicate satisfaction.

Computing Services:

Outcome 1:  (a) Less than 20% of actively used campus computers will be more than 5 years old; (b) Instructors will be able to use the current version or next-most-recent major release of software in their courses; and (c) On satisfaction surveys, at least 80% of students and faculty/staff will agree that computers on campus meet their needs.

Outcome 2:  On satisfaction surveys, at least 80% of faculty and staff will indicate satisfaction with the support provided by Computing Services.

Media/Duplication: Satisfaction surveys are being revised.

 

B) Courses Assessed

Library--Not applicable. However, the outcomes are the Student Learning Outcomes for  ENG 22 and 100 students who are required to complete the Library Research Unit.

The Testing Center--Not applicable.

Computing Services--Not applicable.

Media/Duplication--Not applicable.

Tutoring Services--Not available.

C) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

LIbrary Outcome 1 and 2: Students complete three, 15 question multiple-choice tests designed to measure basic information literacy skills as covered in the study materials and exercises in the Library Research Unit.

Testing Center Outcome 1: Students and faculty complete a survey asking the common survey questions:

Common survey questions for students

1.     The Testing Center staff is friendly and helpful.

2.     The hours at the Testing Center meet my needs.

3.     The atmosphere at the Testing Center is conducive to testing.

4.     The services at the Testing Center are satisfactory.

5.     Tests are administered in a timely and efficient manner.

Computing Services: Student and faculty and staff surveys as well as quantitative data are used to measure quality and quantity of services provided.

Media Services: Assessment tools are being revised, surveys and quantitative data will probably be used for assessment in 2012-2013.

D) Results of Program Assessment

LIbrary Outcomes 1 and 2 Results:

(73%) When given a list of available information sources, (a) choose the appropriate sources (70%) & (b) describe search strategies (75%) for locating the needed information.

(66%) When given the URL for a Web page, access the page, (a) identify the site’s title and author (72%), (b) its publication or posting date (51%), and evaluate key characteristics about the site in terms of the (c) information need (not assessed),  (d) including timeliness (51%), (e) point-of-view (72%), (f) scope (68%), and (g) authority or credibility (75%).

(64%) When given access to a particular information search tool, (a) identify appropriate key words and identify search strings which are focused (68%) and (b) appropriately use phrase searching and 69%) (c) Boolean operators (57%).

Testing Center Outcome 1: Percentage in parentheses reflect satisfactory responses.

1.     The Testing Center staff is friendly and helpful. (96%)

2.     The hours at the Testing Center meet my needs. (92%)

3.     The atmosphere at the Testing Center is conducive to testing. (94%)

4.     The services at the Testing Center are satisfactory. (96%)

5.     Tests are administered in a timely and efficient manner. (94%)

Computing Services:

Outcome 1:  (a) In August 2011, the average age of campus computers was 2.7 years and only 5% were more than 5 years old.  The college allocated no funds to Computing Services for lifecycle replacement of computers during AY2011-2012, and as a result, by August 2012 the average age of campus computers had increased to 3.3 years and 18% were more than 5 years old.  (b) Computing Services provided the latest versions of Mac OS X, Windows, Microsoft Office, Adobe applications, and other software, to those requesting it.  (c) Fall 2011 surveys indicate that the overwhelming majority of students (89%) and faculty & staff (86% or more) are satisfied with the computers, software, and Internet access that the college provides.  The CCSSE data, however, indicates a very slight decrease in the mean student satisfaction with computer labs (from 2.52 in 2008, to 2.46 in 2010, to 2.41 in 2012).

Outcome 2: Fall 2011 surveys indicate that 91% of faculty and staff are satisfied with the adequacy and quality of services provided by the Computing Services staff, and that 93% are satisfied with the response time.  The average rating for both the quality of service and the response time was 3.7 where 4 = Excellent, 3 = Satisfactory, 2 = Less than Satisfactory, and 1 = Poor.


 

E) Other Comments

Media/Duplication Services is currently revising outcomes and assessment tools and have no assessment results to provide.

F) Next Steps

Library:

1. Consult with instructors for suggestions about how to improve overall success, or whether to take an entirely different approach to basic information literacy instruction for ENG 22 and 100 students.

2. Make changes to the instructional materials, with emphasis on analyzing sources in terms of publication date and timeframe, and Boolean operators.

The Testing Center:

1. Move into the new library learning commons.  The overall outcome (including the specific sub-components) have been met. However, it should be noted that the move to the LLC (new library) will provide additonal testing seats in a quiet room, a room with a check-in counter, a separate testing room for students who require accommodations, and improved ambience.

Computing Services:

1. While the needs for up-to-date computer hardware and software were met in AY2011-2012, it became necessary to rely on a growing number of computers that are more than 5 years old due to a lack of funding for lifecycle replacement.  During AY2012-2013, Computing Services will seek adequate funding to replace obsolete computers before problems with them begin hindering instruction and hampering faculty & staff productivity.

2. During AY2012-2013, Computing Services will seek adequate funding to replace obsolete computers before problems with them begin hindering instruction and hampering faculty & staff productivity.

Media Services: Based on quantitative data, the key initiatives are:

• Improve the productivity and expertise of Media Services staff through additional training and streamlining office procedure and operational policies.

• Assess the efficiency of the Media and Duplication centers through a comprehensive survey that includes data sets to be shared across the Community College system.

• Replace or dispose of outdated audio-visual equipment as budget allocations allow.  Focus on the completion and equipping of the Learning Resources Commons.

• Promote web use and facilitate shared maintenance of the college web sites by faculty, staff and students.