Honolulu Community College
2013 Annual Report of Instructional Program Data

Early Childhood Education

The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2013, and can be viewed at:
http://programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/node/862

Program Description

Program Mission

The Early Childhood Education program mission is to:

Program Description

The Early Childhood Education Program addresses its twofold mission in the following ways:

The Associate in Science (AS) degree program in combination with 6 months work experience prepares students for immediate employment as teachers in private early childhood programs for infants and toddlers or preschoolers. With 12 months of full time experience, graduates with the AS degree meet the requirements of the State of Hawai’i Department of Human Services (DHS) to be directors of early childhood programs. The course of study leading to the AS degree is developmentally based and emphasizes observation and opportunities to participate in programs with children through class assignments and field experiences, both on campus and in the community. The program provides candidates with varied opportunities to develop their skills for working with children and families and with a general understanding of the field of early education and care. Students who successfully complete this degree may transfer to the Early Childhood Concentration in the Social Sciences Program at the University of Hawai’i-West O’ahu. The AS degree in Early Childhood Education meets all requirements of that program for lower division course work.

The Children’s Centers are an integral part of the academic program. They serve as final practicum sites for all students in the AS degree program. The final practicum courses (ED 296 B & ED 296I, ED 296 C & ED 296P) are capstones in which all Program Student Learning Outcomes are assessed. The centers also accommodate a variety of students who are preparing assignments for other program’s courses and frequently host visitors from the community and other countries who are interested in observing models of exemplary practice in early care and education.

The Centers also provide essential childcare services that contribute to the academic success of students who can go to class and study knowing their children are well cared for. Faculty and staff who use the services also are able to work with peace of mind about their children’s welfare.  

It is essential for the health of the program that the Children’s Centers be maintained and staffed at the highest level of industry standards, that of NAEYC Accreditation. The facilities that house Keiki Hau`oli Children’s Center at HCC are old and become more difficult to maintain at acceptable levels of safety each year. The College Long Range Development Plan includes a new Human Services Building with space dedicated to a Children’s Center, but the project is scheduled for Phase 2 of the Plan, which has no projected start date (Phase 1 is projected to take 5 – 10 years). Obtaining new or renovated facilities within one or two years is essential to retaining both childcare licensing approval and NAEYC accreditation.

Also essential to maintaining the quality of the Children’s Centers is ensuring appropriate ratios of qualified staff to children. All three Centers currently employ a number student assistants to ensure that coverage is adequate to meet childcare licensing standards. While this provides work experience opportunities for many early childhood majors, the vast majority of these students meet only the lowest level of qualifications under licensing regulations and accreditation standards. They cannot work with young children without supervision. The consequence is that the APT teaching staff have reduced time for curriculum planning, child assessment and other professional duties that are not only required for accreditation, but are also part of their job descriptions. In addition because students can only work part time, teachers must schedule and manage a large number of assistants, further taking away from their time both with children and their other professional duties. When teachers or student assistants are absent due to illness, faculty are often called upon to cover because there are no qualified substitutes. Additional professional teaching staff are needed for safety and to maintain the quality of services to children and families as well as to the academic program.

Faculty and Staff

The program includes nine full time faculty, seven full time and two part time APT teachers in the Children’s Centers, and one office assistant. Lecturers are hired on an as-needed basis, usually one or two each semester. They are assigned a faculty mentor/liaison who is familiar with the course the lecturer is assigned to teach, and assessed through faculty observation and student evaluations each semester. Full time faculty members are Professors Linda Buck, Gaynel Buxton, Patricia Gooch, Iris Saito, Eva Moravcik, Miles Nakanishi, Sheryl Nolte, Cynthia Uyehara, and Lisa Yogi. APT staff include Steven Bobilin, LauraEllen Busche-Ong, Susanne Carvalho, Imelda Garma, Janine Konia, Lisa Padaguan, Jaqueline Rabang, Ena Reelitz, and Dayna Yee. Beverly Chang is the Office Assistant.

The program has begun transition planning as several faculty have indicated that they will retire within the next 1 – 3 years. As noted in the analysis of quantitative date in the Program Efficiency category below, several faculty have non-instructional duty assignments. Of these, three faculty serve as the site manager/coordinators for the three Children’s Centers. This has proven to be an inefficient and ineffective model. While the first priority is to obtain additional APT teachers for the Children’s Centers, the long term goal is to consolidate Centers management under an APT who would serve as Director. The ECE Program Coordinator would maintain oversight of all of the program components (Instruction, Children’s Centers and PACE). The workload for faculty assigned to PACE would remain the same.

Advisory Committee

The Advisory Committee met on February 15, 2013. 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

The underlying foundation for these outcomes is of knowledge of child development and of the multiple interacting factors that influence growth and learning. Through the program, the themes of development, families, communication, diversity and inclusion are addressed. Upon successful completion of the ED program, students will be able to:

  1. Plan, implement and evaluate curriculum and learning environments for individual and groups of children based on knowledge of child development and its multiple influences to ensure that they promote health, safety, positive development, and learning for all children.
  2. Assess children’s progress using formal and informal observation and assessment tools and methods.
  3. Communicate effectively and appropriately with children and adults from all backgrounds to build respectful, reciprocal relationships; use appropriate guidance practices with children.
  4. Participate actively in planning and decision-making concerning the educational, physical, fiscal and human resources in classrooms and programs for children.
  5. Base decisions and actions on ethical and other professional standards.
  6. Demonstrate collaboration, critical thinking and reflection.
  7. Advocate for children and their families in the classroom and the program

Mapping Course SLOs to Program SLOs

All courses have assigned SLOs.  Course SLOs have been mapped to Program SLOs to ensure adequate course SLOs are achieved in order for the student to in turn achieve the desired Program SLOs.  The mapping diagrams are found at the following URL:

 

            http://programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/node/1253

 

It should be noted that codes are used to identify the type of comprehension achieved as well as codes to identify the type of assessment.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Healthy

Majors Included: ECED     Program CIP: 13.1210

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 111 105 103 Healthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 98 90 90
3 *Number of Majors 182.5 218.5 182
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 48 57 48
3b     Fall Full-Time 30% 28% 27%
3c     Fall Part-Time 70% 72% 73%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 3% 2% 1%
3e     Spring Full-Time 28% 25% 23%
3f     Spring Part-Time 72% 75% 77%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 4% 4% 4%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 1,507 1,813 1,512
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 617 588 565
6 SSH in All Program Classes 2,124 2,401 2,077
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 71 80 69
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 53 59 53

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 14.0 14.3 13.8 Healthy
10 *Fill Rate 75.1% 25.5% 79.2%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 9 9 9
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 20.2 24.2 20.2
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 36.2 39.1 35.9
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 5.0 5.6 5.1
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $956,126 $1,284,405 $970,347
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $956,126 $1,279,428 $965,825
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $4,977 $4,522
15 Cost per SSH $450 $535 $467
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 26 26 21
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 74% 79% 79% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 24 23 36
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 65.5% 64.6% 60.6%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     41.8%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 34 41 30
20a Degrees Awarded 20 25 20
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 14 17 10
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 5 5 8
22a Transfers with credential from program 3 1 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 2 4 8

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 6 5 5  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes 144 140 137
25 Fill Rate 90% 93% 94%
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 62% 72% 73%
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 9 10 11
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) 56% 58% 57%

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 100.00 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 33.82 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 74.56 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 73.47 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 4.69 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 3.23 Not Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     20  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     5
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
38 Number of Pell Recipients     73
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     8
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Analysis of the Program Data

Demand

In the area of demand the program remains healthy with the number of majors exceeding the workforce demand and the number of courses taught sufficient to allow majors to take a full schedule if desired. In addition each semester PACE (Professional and Career Education for Early Childhood) the non-credit to credit conversion program enrolls from 75 – 100 participants. About 50 PACE participants convert one or more PACE course to credit each semester.

Efficiency

The programs call of “Healthy” in this indicator is based on the 79% class fill rate and the ratio of majors to FTE BOR appointed faculty (20.2). It should be noted, however, that although the program has a large number of BOR appointed faculty (9), up to 3.8 FTE each semester is assigned to non-instructional duties that include program coordination, management of the three campus children’s centers operated by the program and coordination of the PACE noncredit to credit conversion program.

Effectiveness

The health indicator for Program Effectiveness is determined by three measures: The number of certificates awarded divided by the number of majors; the number of unduplicated degrees divided by the estimated number of replacement positions in the workforce, and students’ persistence from fall to spring semesters.

The Cautionary status of the indicator is confounded by a number of considerations:

On the measure of persistence fall to spring, the program continues a slight downward trending. This is clearly an area that requires further investigation and strategies for improvement. The program faculty has offered voluntary advising for continuing students each semester for a number of years. There is no data, however, on whether advising has an impact on student persistence, or how many students take advantage of the opportunity. Analysis of the impact of advising could help to refine the process to insure the inclusion of students who may need assistance in order to return in the spring semester. The program might also want to drill down in the persistence data to see if there are patterns or particular student profiles that seem more likely to fail to return after fall semester. The program can consider building on the College’s new Early Alert program and other retention strategies by targeting outreach to students who seem likely not to return for the spring semester.

The fact that the program failed to meet the goal for Perkins Core Indicator 2P1 Completion can be attributed in part to the ability of students to meet workforce qualifications without a certificate or degree as discussed above.

Perkins Core Indicators 5P1 and 5P2 address the participation and completion of nontraditional students in the program. While the program attracts a diverse population in regards to ethnicity and age, it enrolls few male students. The care and education of children under the age of 5 is still largely seen as a female pursuit, and, perhaps more importantly, the wages in the field are still far below those of public education or other comparable fields. The ECE program is fortunate to have a male faculty member and two male teachers in the Children’s Centers it operates to serve as role models and resources for males. A recruitment strategy of outreach by these representatives of the program is likely to be more effective than traditional marketing activities such as brochures and media ads. It is not likely, however, to dramatically improve the representation of males in the program, which is, in the end, a reflection of the state of the field of early childhood education and care.

Part III. Action Plan

Progress on Action Plans

See Table 2. Action Plan and Resource Implications below.

Table 2. Action Plan and Resource Implications

Task

Who’s Responsible

Time Frame

Status

Resource Implications

Continue self study for NAEYC Associate Degree Program Accreditation Outcomes 2, 3, 6 & 7

ECE Coordinator, ECE faculty

Sp 09 – F 15

Ongoing

One course release in Fall 14 for one semester for faculty to work with ECE coordinator in completing self-study documentation begin data collection

Collect and analyze Program Assessment Data as part of Early Childhood Associate Degree Accreditation self study. Purchase tablet computers to assist faculty in student assessment. Strongly recommend that the College invest in a web-based assessment system such as Live Text or Task Stream.

Outcome 3

ECE Coordinator, ECE faculty, College Assessment Coordinator, Administration

Sp 09 – F 15

Ongoing

One course release in Spring 15 for one semester for faculty to work with ECE Coordinator to collect and analyze Program Assessment Data

Funding for purchase of tablets.

Funding for web-based assessment system (College)

Work with administration to secure additional teaching staff for Children’s Centers.

Develop alternative scenarios to acquire staff or reduce services in order to ensure that centers remain in compliance with regulations and accreditation standards.

Explore additional sources of operating support, e.g. from campuses served (HCC, KCC, LCC)

Program Mission &

Safety & Compliance

ECE Coordinator, Children’s Centers Faculty Site Coordinators and Staff

Sp 13 – F14

Ongoing

The goal of ensuring two qualified APT teachers in each Children’s Center classroom will require additional funds to hire needed staff. Details will be worked on within the time frame identified.

Work with administration to secure new facilities for Keiki Hau`oli Children’s Center at HCC.

Program Mission & Safety & Compliance

ECE Coordinator, Keiki Hau`oli Coordinator, HCC Adminsitration

Sp 13 – Sp 14

New initiative

Funding for new or renovated facilities

Refine business plan to increase PACE capacity supported by program revenues. Investigate use of special funds to support Office Assistant position. Outcome 2

Division 2 Dean, ECE Program Coordinator, PACE Program Coordinators

Sp 09

On hold due to budget issues

 

Seek funds to develop digital and other teaching materials that are culturally appropriate for Hawai`i. Outcome 7

ECE coordinator, faculty and staff of the Children’s Centers

Sp 09, ongoing

Ongoing – no progress to date

Grants and external funding.

Develop outreach strategy to increase enrollment of males in the program. Outcome 4

Division Chair, Dean, Outreach Counselor, ECE Program Coordinator, male faculty and APT staff.

Sp 14

On-going

Grants, e.g. Perkins

Develop strategies to increase persistence of students from fall to spring semesters.

Faculty, Coordinator, Dean, Recruitment and Student Success Coordinators

Sp 14

On-going

None

Part IV. Resource Implications

See Table 2 for Action Plan and Resource Implications.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Program SLOs are found in the Description section.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

Evidence of Industry Validation

Advisory Committee Members

Buffy Owens, Vice President, Kama`aina Kids

Steve Albert, Executive Director, Rainbow Schools

Momi Akana, Exectutive Director, Keiki `o ka aina

Polly Strona, representing Family Child Care

Michael Fahey, Good Beginnings Alliance

Diane Young, Early Childhood Specialist, DOE

Lynn Cabato, Director, HCAP Early Head Start/Head Start

Brian Te`o, Assistant Director, PACT Early Head Start/Head Start

Kaila Lui-Kwan, Assistant Manager, Kamehameha Early Education Programs, Waianae Area

Nicole Souza, Education Coordinator, Kamehameha Schools Early Childhood Programs

Charmaine Orbistondo, Assistant Director, Christian Academy

Momi Martinez, Director, Honolulu Jewish Preschool

Dale Faulkner, Director, Mililani Missionary Preschool

Cindy Ballard, CANOES Registry Specialist, PATCH

Jeanne Iorio, Assistant Professor, UH-West Oahu, BASS/Early Childhood

At the meeting on February 15, 2013 the ECE Program Advisory Committee acknowledged the program’s efforts to prepare and support effective practitioners, and recommended the following for consideration:

B) Expected Level Achievement

Expected Level of Achievement

Assessment of Program SLOs is accomplished by scaffolding learning opportunities throughout the program culminating in the final field practicum courses, ED 296B & ED 296I (Infant Toddler Seminar and Infant Toddler Laboratory), and ED 296C & ED296P (Preschool Seminar and Preschool Laboratory). All Program SLOs are assessed in these courses. Students are required to complete assessments with a score of 70% or better in order to complete the capstone courses.

Table 1: Early Childhood Education AS Degree Program Assessment of Program Learning Outcomes

Program Learning Outcome

Course Learning Outcome

ED 296C & ED 296P

Culminating Assessment Activities

Plan, implement and evaluate curriculum and learning environments for individual and groups of children based on knowledge of child development and its multiple influences to ensure that they promote health, safety, positive development, and learning for all children.

 

3. Integrate and apply understanding of child development, guidance, curriculum, working with families, professionalism, and program management.

 

Activity Plans and Implementation, Teaching Reflections, Observations, Child Portfolios, Family Conferences, Lead Teaching, Topic Discussions, Mock Interview, Professional Portfolio

 

Assess children's progress using formal and informal observation and assessment tools and methods.

 

4. Document and interpret children’s learning and development.

 

Activity Plans and Implementation, Observations, Child Portfolios

Communicate effectively and appropriately with children and adults from all backgrounds to build respectful, reciprocal relationships; use appropriate guidance practices with children.

 

5. Relate positively and effectively to children of different ages individually and in groups

6. Communicate respectfully and clearly with families using diverse means and help them understand children's development and learning.

7. Perform effectively as a member of a team in support of children's growth and learning.

 

Activity Plans and Implementation, Teaching Reflections

 

Child Portfolio, Family Conferences, Newsletter

 

 

Lead Teaching, Professional Dispositions Reflection

Participate actively in planning and decision-making concerning the educational, physical, fiscal and human resources in classrooms and programs for children.

 

1. Evaluate, select and implement appropriate, effective teaching practices consistent with Hawaii 0-5 practice standards (ASK)

 

2. Demonstrate how observation and reflection are used for planning and practice

 

Activity Plans and Implementation, Teaching Reflections, Child Portfolios, Family Conferences, Lead Teaching, Reading Responses, Mock Interview, Professional Portfolio

Activity Plans and Implementation, Observations, Teaching Reflections, Child Portfolios

Base decisions and actions on ethical and other professional standards.

 

3. Integrate and apply understanding of child development, guidance, curriculum, working with families, professionalism, and program management.

 

Activity Plan and Implementation, Teaching Reflections, Observations, Child Portfolios, Family Conferences, Lead Teaching, Topic Discussions, Mock Interview, Professional Portfolio

Demonstrate collaboration, critical thinking and reflection.

 

1. Evaluate, select and implement appropriate, effective teaching practices consistent with Hawaii 0-5 practice standards (ASK)

 

2. Demonstrate how observation and reflection are used for planning and practice

 

Activity Plans and Implementation, Teaching Reflections, Child Portfolios, Family Conferences, Lead Teaching, Reading Responses, Mock Interview, Professional Portfolio

Activity Plans and Implementation, Observations, Teaching Reflections, Child Portfolios

Advocate for children and their families in the classroom and the program.

 

6. Communicate respectfully and clearly with families using diverse means and help them understand children's development and learning.

7. Perform effectively as a member of a team in support of children's growth and learning.

 

Child Portfolio, Family Conferences, Newsletter

 

 

Lead Teaching, Professional Dispositions Reflection

C) Courses Assessed

Courses Assessed

Individual instructors assess all course SLOs each time the course is offered. Course SLOs are linked to Program SLOs. In Spring 2012 faculty addressed assessment of the program as whole for the first time.

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Assessment Strategy

Two methods of assessing SLOs were used in Spring 2012.

E) Results of Program Assessment

Results of Program Assessment

From these first attempts at program assessment, we learned that faculty need more discussion and preparation in how to collect data in a uniform manner so that it can be analyzed at the program level. For example, not all faculty established a target goal or completed the SLO inventory in a similar manner.

A system to collect the results and analyze them for program improvement purposes is also needed. Identifying an assessment system that will facilitate collecting and aggregating assessment data in order to analyze it for areas of strength, areas that require more attention, and trends will be an important next step. This will be done in conjunction with the support of the College and in the context of the self-study for the National Association for the Education of Young Children Early Childhood Associate Degree Accreditation (ECADA) as shown in the Action Plan above.

Analysis results of course and program SLOs can be found at:

http://programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/node/1625

 

F) Other Comments

No content.

G) Next Steps

No content.