University of Hawaii Community Colleges
2010 Annual Report of Program Data
Hawaii Community College
Instructional Executive Summary

Hawaii Community College Annual Program Review

Executive Summary

AY 2009-2010

 

With the completion of its sixth cycle of Program/Unit reviews, all programs and units have gone through the comprehensive review process at least once.  As required by the UHCC system, every instructional and non-instructional program did an Annual Program Review.  This year the Liberal Arts program has its own program review and health call scoring rubric.  Two full years of data were provided to the programs and the programs were asked to analyze the data.

To begin this annual program review process, in October, HawaiiCC’s Institutional Researcher provided separate training sessions to five focused groups on the program review data delivery plan.

What is different this year?

HawaiiCC has 26 programs including Liberal Arts.  Nine of the 26 are under the Applied Technical Education (ATE) Division.  These nine programs plus Nursing (ADN and PRCN) and Culinary have program capacity limitations which may skew the data since all majors may not necessarily be in the program.  “Number of Majors” is used in two of the calculations and may work either for or against the health call of the program.  In addition, the programs with one program faculty intake new students only once every two years.  The methodology used for program health calls may not be robust enough to effectively analyze the program based on its cyclic nature and necessarily low class sizes. 

HawaiiCC has two (2) programs with an overall Unhealthy call, nineteen (19) programs deemed Cautionary, and five (5) Healthy (including the Liberal Arts program).

Overall Health Call – Cautionary (19 programs)

Accounting (ACC):  Demand indicator is Healthy.  Number of majors has increased from 60 to 78 with 22 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 3.5 majors per job, a Healthy call.  The demand in the program classes are predominately non-majors; only 34% being program majors.  The Efficiency indicator is Cautionary primarily because there is only one FTE BOR appointed faculty for 78 majors.  The fill rate decreased by 5% to 81% but remains a Healthy call.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  The ratio of degrees awarded to number of majors is 15% and the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is .55; both Cautionary calls.  The 71% Persistence (Fall to Spring) decreased by 1% and is Cautionary.  Two students transferred to a UH 4-year which is a plus for the program.  Considerable time and energy has been spent by the 1 BOR faculty in developing a distance component for the program.  The 58% successful completion rate for online students is a decrease of 11% from AY2008-2009 and the number of students withdrawing increased by 7 students to 19, an area to address.  ACC met all Perkins IV Core Indicators except non-trad completion.  More effort needs to be directed in recruiting and retaining non-trad students. ACC has committed to an ambitious set of goals and objectives.  The program faculty hope to improve persistence rates (face to face and online), number of degrees awarded, and number of students transferring to a UH 4-year through increased mentoring and counseling with student majors.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Administration of Justice (AJ):  Demand indicator is Healthy.  Number of majors has been steady at 106 with 37 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 2.9 majors per job, a Healthy call.  The demand in the program classes are 60% program majors to 40% non-majors.  The Efficiency indicator is Cautionary primarily because there is only one FTE BOR appointed faculty for 106 majors.  The fill rate increased by 2% to 93%; a Healthy call.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  The ratio of degrees awarded to majors is 12%, an Unhealthy call, and the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is .35, Cautionary.  The 74% Persistence (Fall to Spring) increased by 1% and is Cautionary.  Five students transferred to a UH 4-year which is a plus for the program.  The requests for a second 1.0 FTE AJ faculty and an Ed Spec were not approved.  Considerable time and energy has been spent by the 1 BOR faculty on program modifications.  The completely on-line classes had a 96% fill rate with 68% successful completion, a decrease of 6% from AY2008-2009.  Eight students withdrew.  The AJ program met all Perkins IV Core indicators.  AJ has tried to collaborate with the English department to develop a new Report or Technical Writing course for AJ and should continue to pursue.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.  

Agriculture (AG):  Demand indicator is Unhealthy.  Number of majors increased by 3 students to 26 with 155 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to .17 majors per job, an Unhealthy call.  The program’s capacity is currently between 12 and 14 students.  While this capacity has fulfilled past needs, it will be impossible to meet trending demands and new opportunities without an increase in classroom and faculty resources.  It is important to note that there is no estimation of entrepreneurial opportunities for which many program students hope to endeavor.  The state’s heavy reliance on imports of food and plant materials, increased awareness of the importance of food security and community sustainability couples with our islands’ unique environments are indicators of opportunity for entrepreneurial growth and a continued positive trend in positions statewide.  The number of classes taught went from 11 to 6, yet the SSH in all program classes had a 38% increase.  The Efficiency indicator is Healthy with fill rate at 99% and one FTE BOR appointed faculty for 26 majors.  The number of low enrolled classes decreased from 8 to 1.  The Effectiveness indicator is Unhealthy.  The ratio of degrees awarded to majors is 7.7%, an Unhealthy call, and the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is .01, Cautionary.  Efforts have been made to increase the number of degrees awarded by creating two Certificates of Completion for students wishing to exit after two semesters.  The problem is students exiting the program do not always apply for certificates or degrees.  Increased mentoring and counseling may help to improve this.    The 64% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is a decrease by 3% and is Cautionary.  AG met four of the six  Perkins IV Core Indicators including the nontraditional ones.  The methodology used for program health calls may not be robust enough to effectively analyze the Agriculture program based on its cyclic nature and necessarily low class sizes.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Architectural Engineering and CAD Technology (AEC)Demand indicator is Unhealthy.  Number of majors decreased by 3 students to 59 with only 3 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 19.7 majors per job, an Unhealthy call.  The Blueprint Reading courses are “housed” with AEC causing the non-majors in program classes to be at 34%.  The program is incorporating Green Building Designs into its curriculum which will expand the employment opportunity base.  The Efficiency indicator is Healthy.  Number of majors to FTE BOR appointed faculty is 29.5, a Healthy call.  The fill rate increased by 4% to 88%, a Healthy call.  The Effective indicator is Cautionary.  The ratio of degrees awarded to majors is 23.8%, a Healthy call.  However, the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is 4.7, an Unhealthy call.  The 71% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is a decrease of 4% and is a Cautionary call.  Two students transferred to UH 4-year which is a plus for the program.  The program has been looking into partnering with UH-Manoa and UH-Hilo’s pre-engineering programs.  The AEC program met all Perkins IV Core indicators.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.  

Automotive Mechanics Technology (AMT):  Demand indicator is Unhealthy.  Number of majors increased by 42 to 93 with only 17 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 5.47 majors per job, an Unhealthy call.  The number of classes taught remained the same, yet SSH in all program classes increased 29% to 1140.  The economic situation has been very flat yet student enrollment has significantly increased.  Students become more competitive in the job market with a degree.  Industry partners indicate a slight increase in the local economy.  The Efficiency indicator is Healthy.  Number of majors to FTE BOR appointed faculty is 46.5, Cautionary.  The fill rate increased of 100% is Healthy.  The Effectiveness indicator is Healthy.  The ratio of degrees awarded to majors is 23.4% and the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement position in the County is 1.29, both Healthy calls.  The 79% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is an increase of 5% and is Healthy.  One student transferred to UH 4-year which is a plus for the program.  AMT did not meet the Perkins IV Core Indicators on non-trad.  More effort needs to be directed in recruiting and retaining non-trad students.   It is suggested that AMT explore ways to improve non-trad Perkins indicators and apply for Perkins funding if financial resources are needed.  Through special and Perkins funding, AMT upgraded several equipment items to meet industry standards.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.  

Business Technology (BTEC):  The Demand indicator is Unhealthy.  Number of majors increased from 93 to 103 with 13 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 7.92 majors per job, an Unhealthy call.  The demand in the program classes consists evenly of majors and non-majors.  The Efficiency indicator is Healthy.  The number of majors to FTE BOR appointed faculty is 25.8, a Healthy call.  The fill rate remained the same at 82%, a Healthy call.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  The ratio of degrees awarded and majors is 23% and the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is 1.85, a Cautionary call.  The 69% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is the same as AY2008-2009 and is Cautionary.  78% had successful completion.  There were 30 withdrawals, an area to address.  One complete on-line course was offered with an 83% fill rate and successful completion of 60%.  BTEC met three of the six Perkins IV Core Indicators and did not meet both nontrad participation and completion.  Many of the jobs in this area do not pay a living wage and therefore are not attractive for males so the program faculty will need to be creative in attracting males into the program in order to meet these indicators.  BTEC has done curricular modifications and worked with Nursing faculty to modify the Medical Office Assistant certificate of completion, to be offered Fall 2011.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Carpentry (CARP):  The Demand indicator is Cautionary.  Number of majors decreased from 61 to 46 with 60 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to .77 majors per job, a Cautionary call.  The program’s capacity is currently about 32 students which means the remainder of the number of majors are pre-majors.  The Efficiency indicator is Healthy.  The number of majors to FTE BOR appointed faculty is 15.3, a Healthy call.  The data reports 3 FTE BOR appointed faculty when in actuality there are only two; nevertheless still considered Healthy.  The fill rate decreased by 4% and at 89% is deemed Healthy.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  The ratio of degrees awarded to majors of 23.9% is Healthy and the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County of .18 is Unhealthy.  The 78% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is an increase of 1% and is Healthy.  100% had successful completion.  CARP did not meet the two non-trad Perkins IV Core Indicators.  More effort needs to be directed in recruiting and retaining non-trad students.   It is suggested CARP explore ways to improve non-trad Perkins indicators and apply for Perkins funding if financial resources are needed.  CARP works closely with Construction Academy to be sure the necessary knowledge and skills are taught at the high schools.  The handful of students with articulated high school credits have done well.  CARP is embracing Green Building Technology into the Annual Model Home project.  CARP continues to negotiate with the Carpenter’s Union Local 745 to obtain additional classroom credits for graduating CARP students.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Diesel Mechanics Technology (DISL):  The Demand indicator is Unhealthy.  Number of majors increased by 3 students to 28 with 3 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 9.3 majors per job, an Unhealthy call.  The program is dependent on the construction industry which continues on a downward trend causing new a replacement positions to be weak on the Big Island and should the economy remain the same, the DISL program will struggle with this rating.  There were 50 SSH non-majors in program classes and this needs to be looked at to be sure non-majors are not taking the seats of majors.  The Efficiency indicator is Healthy with fill rate at 99% and one FTE BOR appointed faculty for 28 majors.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  There was an increase of 3 degrees awarded for a total of 11 and in relationship to the number of majors, the call is Healthy at 39%.  The ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is 3.7, an Unhealthy call.  The 72% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is a decrease of 7% and is Cautionary.  Successful completion is 95% with only 1 withdrawal.  DISL did not meet the two Perkins IV Core Indicators on non-trad.  More effort needs to be directed in recruiting non-trad students.  The idea of forming a technical maintenance council is a good one.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Digital Media Arts (DMA):  The Demand indicator is Unhealthy.  Number of majors increased by 8 students to 62 with 5 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 12.4 majors per job, an Unhealthy call.  HawaiiCC offers programs to meet the demand of the community so the excuse that “New and Replacement Position in the State and County are outside of the control of our institution and reflect the job/labor trends in the community” is unacceptable.  The program will need to be proactive, research the community, and modify its program to expand the employment opportunity base.  The demand in the program classes are 59% program majors to 41% non-majors.  The Efficiency indicator is Cautionary with fill rate at 90% and no FTE BOR appointed faculty for the 62 majors.  The program did not report its budget allocation.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  There was an increase of 6 certificates awarded for a total of 8 and in relationship to the number of majors, the call is Unhealthy at 13%.  The ratio of certificates awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is 1.6, a Cautionary call.  The 71% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is an increase of 10% and is Cautionary.  Successful completion is 83% with 6 withdrawals a sizable improvement from 26 in the previous AY.  DMA did not meet any of its Perkins IV Core Indicators.  DMA should explore ways to improve Perkins indicators and apply for Perkins funding if financial resources are needed.  There is no action plan and no mention of assessment.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Early Childhood Education (ECED):  The Demand indicator is Cautionary.  Number of majors increased from 91 to 93 with 73 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 1.27 majors per job, a Cautionary call.  The demand in the program classes consists of both program majors as well as non-majors.  The Efficiency indicator is Cautionary.  The ratio majors to FTE BOR appointed faculty is 46.5, a Cautionary call.  The fill rate increased 12% and at 73% is deemed Cautionary.  Number of low-enrolled classes decreased from 11 to 7.  The Effectiveness indicator is Unhealthy.  The ratio of Degrees awarded to the number of majors is 12%, an Unhealthy call.  The ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is .16, a Cautionary call.  The 55% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is a decrease of 10% and is Unhealthy.  74% had successful completion.  There were 12 withdrawals, an area to address.  ECE met two of the six Perkins IV Core Indicators and did not meet both nontrad participation and completion.  Many of the jobs in this area do not pay a living wage and therefore are not attractive for males so the program faculty will need to be creative in attracting males into the program in order to meet these indicators.  It is suggested ECE explore ways to improve Perkins indicators and apply for Perkins funding if financial resources are needed.  ECE has committed to an ambitious set of goals and objectives and is commended for pursuing NAEYC National Accreditation, for creating and piloting learning outcomes and assessment that will be aligned at all levels, and for implementing the professional portfolio as the student’s capstone project.

Electrical Installation & Maintenance Technology (EIMT):  The Demand indicator is Cautionary.  Number of majors increased by 4 students to 92 with 22 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 4.2 majors per job, a Cautionary call.  The program’s capacity is currently about 40 students which means the majority of majors are pre-majors preparing to get into the program.  The Efficiency indicator is Healthy with fill rate at 88% and two FTE BOR appointed faculty for 92 majors.  The program did not report its budget allocation.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  There was a decrease of 3 degrees awarded for a total of 12 and in relationship to the number of majors, the call is Unhealthy at 13%.  The ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is .55, a Cautionary call.  The 76% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is an increase of 3% and is Healthy.  Successful completion is 96% with only 1 withdrawal.  EIMT met 5 out of the 6 Perkins IV Core Indicators, not meeting nontrad participation.  More effort needs to be directed in recruiting and retaining non-trad students.  EIMT is in the process of modifying its curriculum to include photovoltaic technology to prepare students to be employable for the renewable energy market.   There is no action plan and no mention of assessment.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Electronics Technology:  The Demand indicator is Unhealthy.  Number of majors decreased by 1 student to 18 with 2 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 9 majors per job, an Unhealthy call.  The Efficiency indicator is Cautionary with fill rate at 44% and one FTE BOR appointed faculty for 18 majors.  The one FTE BOR faculty has since retired.  The program did not report its budget allocation.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  There were no degrees awarded which is Unhealthy.  The 78% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is a decrease of 5% but still considered Healthy.  Successful completion is 90% with no withdrawals.  ET met 3 out of the 6 Perkins IV Core Indicators and did not meet both nontrade participation and completion.  More effort needs to be directed in recruiting and retaining non-trad students.  It is suggested ET explore ways to improve Perkins indicators and apply for Perkins funding if financial resources are needed.  Due to the absence of a FTE BOR faculty, no analysis was done.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Fire Science (FIRE):  The Demand indicator is Cautionary.  Number of majors is at 45 with 11 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 4.09 majors per job, a Cautionary call.  The demand in the program classes consists of 54% program and 46% as non-majors.  The Efficiency indicator is Cautionary with fill rate at 83% and no FTE BOR appointed faculty for the 45 majors.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  The ratio of degrees awarded to majors is 6.7%, an Unhealthy call and the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is .27, Cautionary.  The 70% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is Unhealthy.  81% had successful completion with one withdrawal.  FIRE was approved for provisional status in March 2009 and has not yet moved forward for permanent status.  The College has converted a vacant faculty position to a full-time position in Fire Science and will be hired for Spring 2011.  The FIRE faculty has a good working relationship with the County Fire Chief as well as federal and state fire agencies.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Hawaiian Life Styles (HLS):  The Demand indicator is Cautionary.  Number of majors has decreased from 59 to 57 with 12 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 4.75 majors per job, a Cautionary call.  HLS has strong academic crossover appeal in which demand in the program classes are predominately with non-majors; only 20% being program majors.  The Efficiency indicator is Healthy.  There are 9.5 majors to FTE BOR appointed faculty, a Cautionary call. The Fill Rate increased by 12% to 88%, a Healthy call.  The number of low-enrolled classes decreased from 8 to 3.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  The ratio of degrees awarded to majors is 29.8% and the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is 1.41, both Healthy calls.  The 59% Persistence (Fall to Spring) decreased by 6% and is Unhealthy.  Successful completion is 74% with 38 withdrawals, an area to address.  Five students transferred to a UH 4-year which is a plus for the program.  HLS met 3 out of the 6 Perkins IV Core Indicators and did not meet nontrad completers.  Twelve complete on-line courses were offered with a 98% fill rate and successful completion of 72%.  HLS offerings are largely value-added and the quality of  program offerings is relative to our communities social-ecological, cultural, and interpersonal needs.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Information Technology (IT).  The Demand indicator is Healthy.  Number of majors decreased by 2 to 31 and with 12 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 2.6 majors per job, a Healthy call.  The demand in the program classes are 55% program majors to 45% non-majors primarily due to ICS 100/101 being open to anyone meeting the prerequisites.  In an effort to increase enrollment IT has proposed to lower the Math prerequisites in the introductory ICS courses.  Since f2007 ICS 100 fulfills the Social Science general education requirement which has helped to increase enrollment.  The Efficiency indicator is Unhealthy with fill rate at 49% and no FTE BOR appointed faculty for 31 majors.  This data is not accurate as IT has one FTE BOR appointed faculty with 31 majors and is actually a Healthy call.  Effectives indicator is Cautionary.  The ratio of degrees awarded to majors is 19.4% and the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is .5, both Cautionary calls.  The 64% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is a decrease of 10% and is Cautionary.  This is a significant decrease that needs to be addressed.  Successful Completion was 83%, an increase of 11% with three withdrawals.  IT met three of the four Perkins IV Core Indicators.  IT benefits from strong community support.  The majority of its graduates have obtained employment.  IT has an ambitious Action Plan and if carried out should help to increase its enrollment.  The development of a Health IT certificate of completion as part of the Beacon Community Grant is exciting.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Machine, Welding, and Industrial Mechanics (MWIM):  The Demand indicator is Unhealthy.  Number of majors increased by 14 students to 58 with 4 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 14.5 majors per job, an Unhealthy call.  MWIM is questioning the low number of new and replacement positions and will need to review its EMSI SOC codes to expand the employment opportunity base.  This program is the only program of its kind in the state.  There was a sizable increase in SSH in all program classes due to the increase in the number of classes taught.  The Efficiency indicator is Healthy with fill rate at 90% and major to FTE BOR appointed faculty of 28.8.  Low-enrolled classes decreased by 5, from 8 to 3.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  There was a significant increase of degrees/certificates awarded, from 6 to 28 and in relationship to the number of majors the call is Healthy at 48%.  MWIM responded to a need by the Hawaii County Economic Opportunity Council (HCEOC) to train its employees as technicians to work in the renewable energy field.  This group comprised a second cohort of students.  The ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is 7, an Unhealthy call.  The 84% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is a decrease of 5% but remains a Healthy call.  Successful completion is 94% with 13 withdrawals, a significant amount that needs to be addressed.  MWIM did not meet four of the six  Perkins IV Core Indicators including non-trad participation and completion..  More effort needs to be directed in recruiting non-trad students and meeting the core indicators.  MWIM has an ambitious Action Plan that if carried out should enhance its program.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Marketing (MKT):  The Demand indicator is Cautionary.  Number of majors remains the same at 29 with 57 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to .51 majors per job, a Cautionary call.  The courses offered in MKT support the other Business Education and Technology programs.  As a result, the demand in the program is predominantly non-majors with 23% consisting of program majors.  The Efficiency indicator is Healthy.  The majors to FTE BOR appointed faculty is 14.0, a Cautionary call.  The fill rate increased 5% to 81%, a Healthy call.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  The ratio of degrees awarded to majors is 24%, a Healthy call; however the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is .12, an Unhealthy call.  The 76% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is Healthy.  Successful completion decreased 8% to 75% and there were 11 withdrawals.  These are significant and need to be addressed.   There was one transfer to UH 4-year, a plus for the program.  One complete on-line course was offered with an 83% fill rate and successful completion of 88% which is good for an online class.  MKT met five of the six Perkins IV Core Indicators, not meeting 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment.  MKT has begun participation efforts in the Western Association of Food Chains (WAFC) recognized retail management certificate.  This will increase the pool of potential students to include and attract industry active individuals who may not have originally planned on attending an educational institution.  MKT has also taken active steps to familiarize students with the MKT program and to introduce them to the true definition of Marketing and its professional possibilities.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

NURSING--ADN  (NURS):  The demand indicator is Unhealthy.  NURS continues to be a high demand area.  Number of majors increased by 64 students to 422 with 34 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 12.4 majors per job, an Unhealthy call.  The program’s capacity is currently about 40 students which mean the majority of majors are pre-majors preparing to get into the program.  The Efficiency indicator is Healthy.  Although the fill rate decreased dramatically by 16% to 81%, this remains a Healthy call.  NURS has 14 FTE BOR appointed faculty for 422 majors, a Healthy call.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  Nineteen degrees were awarded and in relationship to the number of majors, the call is Unhealthy at 4.5%.  The ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is .26, a Cautionary call.  The 76% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is Healthy.  Successful completion is 93% with 9 withdrawals.  Because of the way the health is determined in the Demand and Effectiveness areas, the program is in a Cautionary Status.  NURS met 5 out of the 6 Perkins IV Core Indicators, not meeting nontrad participation.  More effort needs to be directed in recruiting and retaining non-trad students, although 6 of 29 spring 2009 graduates were male.  Equipping and occupying the new modular nursing learning resource center in Kona supports the mission of serving the entire island of Hawaii.  NURS faculty are currently engaged in completion of the NLNAC Self-Study for the February 2011 accreditation site visit.  Achieving NLNAC accreditation allows for the continued existence of the ADN program and the workforce mission of the College.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Substance Abuse Counseling (SUBS):  The Demand indicator is Healthy.  Number of majors has been steady at 23 with 8 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 2.9 majors per job, a Healthy call.  SUBS has strong academic crossover appeal in which demand in the program classes are predominately with non-majors; only 35% being program majors.  Kauai Community College students seeking the Certificate of Completion in SUBS normally declare HawaiiCC as their secondary campus.  A PCR request for a 1.0 FTE BOR faculty was submitted but rejected.  The Efficiency indicator is Cautionary with fill rate at 77% and no FTE BOR appointed faculty for the 23 majors.  The Effectiveness indicator is Cautionary.  The ratio of degrees awarded to majors is 69.6%, a Healthy call; and the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is 2.0, a Cautionary call.  The 63% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is a 26% increase and is Cautionary.  Two students transferred to a UH 4-year which is a plus for the program.  SUBS met 2 out of the 4 Perkins IV Core Indicators.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

Overall Health Call – Unhealthy (2 programs)

Hospitality and Tourism (HOST).  The Demand indicator is Cautionary.  Number of majors remained the same at 28 with 22 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 1.27 majors per job, a Cautionary call.  Although the number of majors and the total number of classes taught remained the same, the SSH in all program classes and the average class size decreased and there were 4 more low-enrolled classes.  The Efficiency indicator is Unhealthy with fill rate at 40% and no FTE BOR appointed faculty for 28 majors.  The Effectiveness indicator is Unhealthy.  The ratio of degrees awarded to majors is 7.1% and the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is .09, both Unhealthy calls.  The 74% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is an increase of 8% and is Cautionary.  Successful Completion was 63%, a decrease of 20%, with six withdrawals.  This is substantial and need to be addressed.  HOST met all four Perkins IV Core Indicators.  The HOST curriculum requires students to take the first semester of the CULN program.  This is unattractive for many HOST majors and may be the gatekeeper that the HOST program needs to address.  HOST has an ambitious Action Plan that if carried out should help to increase its enrollment.  Of utmost importance is ongoing assessment with results used for continuous quality improvement of program and student learning.

TropicalForestEcosystem & Agroforestry Management (TEAM):  The Demand indicator is Unhealthy.  Number of majors increased by 8 students to 47 with 2 new and replacement positions in the County.  This equates to 23.5 majors per job, an Unhealthy call.  TEAM is questioning the low number of new and replacement positions and will need to review its EMSI SOC codes to expand the employment opportunity base. The SSH in all program classes had a 26% decrease.  Although the number of majors and the total number of classes taught increased, the average class size decreased and there were 3 more low-enrolled classes.  The Efficiency indicator is Unhealthy with fill rate at 46% and no FTE BOR appointed faculty for 47 majors. This information is incorrect as one FTE BOR appointed faculty has been hired for the TEAM program.  Cost per SSH increased from $654 to $737.  The ratio of degrees awarded to majors is 10.6% and the ratio of degrees awarded to new and replacement positions in the County is 2.5, both Cautionary calls.  The 77% Persistence (Fall to Spring) is a decrease of 9% and is Cautionary.  Successful Completion was 86% with no withdrawals.  TEAM met 5 of the 6 Perkins IV Core Indicators and surpassed the goals for nontrade students.  TEAM is situated in an ideal environment which provides students with the opportunity for hands-on field experience.  TEAM has a strong relationship with its Advisory Council which strengthens the program as well as provides internship opportunities for students.  TEAM has committed to an ambitious set of goals and objectives.

Overall Health Call – Healthy (5 programs)

Auto Body Repair and Painting (ABRP), Culinary Arts (CULN), Human Services (HSER), Liberal Arts (LBRT), and Nursing—Practical (PRCN) were all deemed Healthy.

Care Home Operator (CHO):  This program has been deleted as of May 2010.

 

 Executive Summary

Remedial/Developmental Education Programs 2009-2010

HawaiiCommunity Collegecompleted program reviews in remedial mathematics, reading, and writing for the second time.  Through the efforts of the system-wide committee on remedial/developmental education a set of data was delivered to each campus. 

The College uses the Compass Placement Test to place students appropriately in the various levels in math, reading, and writing.  Based on Placement Test results, students are required to take these courses before gaining access to college-level courses for the Associate of Arts (AA) degree and for courses in the Career and Technical Education programs.  It should be noted that the College does not have a separate program for remedial/developmental education; however, the courses are an integral part of the Liberal Arts and Public Services Division.

There is a high demand for remedial/developmental classes and the “program” is managed efficiently.  A high percentage of students complete the courses; however, the percent of students receiving a grade of “C” or higher ranges from 44% to 67%.

Eighty sections of remedial/developmental math classes were offered with 950 students enrolled during AY2009-2010.  This is an increase of 25.7% over the previous academic year.  Non-regular discipline faculty are heavily relied on to teach classes with only 30% of classes taught by regular discipline faculty.  The average class size was 23.9 with a 100% fill-rate.  There were no low-enrolled classes.  Cost per SSH was $80.  92% of students completed 1 level below college level courses with 63% receiving a grade of “C” or higher.  93% of students completed 2 levels below college level courses with 66% receiving a grade of “C” or higher.  96% of students completed 3 or more levels below college level courses with 67% receiving a grade of “C” or higher.

Thirty-four sections of remedial/developmental reading classes were offered with 604 students enrolled during AY2009-2010.  This is an increase of 24.3% over the previous academic year.  Regular discipline faculty taught 53% of the classes.  The average class size was 19.1 with a 96% fill rate.  There was only 1 (2.9%) low enrolled class.  The program budget allocation provided on the data sheet is incorrect; the cost per SSH was $120.  97% of students completed 1 level below college level courses with 65% receiving a grade of “C” or higher.  93% of students completed 2 levels below college level courses with 50% receiving a grade of “C” or higher.  100% of students completed 3 or more levels below college level courses with 57% receiving a grade of “C” or higher.

Thirty-seven sections of remedial/developmental writing classes were offered with 599 students enrolled during AY2009-2010.  This is an increase of 6.6% over the previous academic year.  Regular discipline faculty taught 70% of the classes.  The average class size was 19.1 with a 95% fill rate.  There were no low enrolled classes.  The program budget allocation provided on the data sheet is incorrect; the cost per SSH was $125.  94% of students completed 1 level below college level courses with 53% receiving a grade of “C” or higher.  95% of students completed 2 levels below college level courses with 47% receiving a grade of “C” or higher.  99% of students completed 3 or more levels below college level courses with 44% receiving a grade of “C” or higher.

Remedial/developmental faculty and lecturers have engaged in initiatives to increase student success rates.  Participation continue in the Hulu`ena program, an Achieving the Dream (AtD) initiative which involves tutors and counselors actively assisting native Hawaiian students in an effort to increase retention.  Successful completion of at least one remedial/development course within first academic year of an AtD cohort averaged 63%.  In AY2009-2010, the reading and writing remedial/developmental faculty and lecturers participated in a new pilot program, Hui Makamae, which includes additional student support.

Remedial/developmental faculty have participated in campus Remedial/Developmental committees as well as a system-wide Developmental Education Committee.  In addition, math faculty participate in Math Summits, a collaboration between Department of Education teachers and UHCC faculty to enhance smoother transitions for students between high school and the community colleges, and reading faculty participate in Reading Summits, a collaboration with UHCC faculty to articulate courses—students learning outcomes (SLOs), rubrics, and assessment strategies—within the UH system 

There are ongoing discussions of SLOs for remedial/development courses as well as sharing of best practices campus and system-wide to increase student success.  The remedial/development classes are included in the ongoing 20% review of courses.

Many of the programs rely heavily on the support of the Liberal Arts department to offer courses in Remedial/Developmental math, reading, and writing.  Some of the challenges facing the offerings in our remedial/development programs are lack of resources, inadequate facilities, increased demand on faculty to participate in initiatives to service this population, and a decreasing pool of qualified lecturers in most disciplines. Additional challenges also include the separation of the lower campus from the upper campus and the separation of the East and West campuses.  A half-time English faculty and a half-time Math faculty were hired for West Hawaii to support the increase in courses offered there.