University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kauai Community College
Program: Early Childhood Education

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2005 on web, submitted 2012, and can be viewed at:
http://info.kauai.hawaii.edu/admin/prapru.htm#pr

Program Description

 

Program Description:

The mission of the Early Childhood Education Program at Kauai Community College is to provide readily accessible education and training to prepare people to work in various capacities with children ages birth to eight and their families, and/or to transfer to the UH setting to pursue a Bachelors and/or advanced degree.  The Early Childhood Education Program supports the mission of the Kaua’i Community College in many ways.

Through coursework, supervised field experiences in community early education settings, and mentored practicum at the on-campus Early Childhood Development Lab Preschool, Na Kama Pono, the Early Childhood Education Program meets the preferred training and experience requirements for early education teachers as described by the State of Hawaii’s Department of Social Services.  The ECE Program offers students a career pathway that includes a Certificate of Competence (9 credits) and a Certificate of Achievement (39 credits) which provide background and experience needed for entry level positions in the field,  as well as an Associate of Science Degree (62 credits) which articulates into UH West O’ahu’s Bachelor of Social Science Program with a concentration in Early Childhood Education.  Full-time students can complete the Certificate of Achievement in two semesters and a summer.  The Associate in Science Degree in Early Childhood Education can be completed in five semesters of full-time study.

The Early Childhood Education Program is staffed by one full-time faculty member hired in August 2012 who serves as the Program Coordinator, Director of the Early Childhood Development Lab Preschool, and Instructor for the three lab courses. Three to four part-time Lecturers are hired per semester to teach the other courses offered in the program. A full-time Teacher and Assistant Teacher, as well as three to four part-time KCC students hired as Classroom Aides staff the on-campus Early Childhood Development Lab Preschool, Na Kama Pono.

Accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children, the campus-based Early Childhood Development Lab Preschool is an integral component of the Early Childhood Education Program and is interwoven into the Kauai Community College campus and broader community in many ways.  Designed as the ECE Program’s demonstration preschool, Na Kama Pone provides an accessible, quality setting for ECE students to complete course assignments and gain practical experience through supervised, mentored practicum required for degree completion and employment in the field.  The Early Childhood Development Lab Preschool contributes significantly to KCC’s student and employee recruitment and retention efforts by providing a valuable support-service for first-priority student-parents attending KCC classes, faculty and staff needing on-site, full-day child care, students from various disciplines needing part-time employment, and high-school students enrolled in work-study courses and other volunteers from the community needing practical, resume-building experience. The Early Childhood Development Lab provides an accessible setting for students from other disciplines such as psychology, social sciences, and nursing to complete assignments and gain practical experience observing and interacting with young children and families, as well as a site at which to apply talent and skill sets learned in other programs such as the Hawaiian studies, Music, Culinary Arts and Carpentry programs to various projects. The Early Childhood Development Lab also serves as a valuable community resource and venue for events such as parent workshops required of families receiving the Puahi Kamamahea Scholarships, and professional development opportunities for early education professionals hosted by the KCC Early Education Program as well as various organizations and agencies such as Good Beginnings Alliance and the Kauai Association for the Education of Young Children. 

Licensed for 20 preschool children ages 2.8 to 6 years of age, the Early Childhood Development Lab Preschool, Na Kama Pono, has consistently maintained full enrollment and a waiting list of interested families. As of the date of this report the Lab Preschool is fully enrolled serving 20 children from 19 families, with a waiting list of 27 children of KCC student-parent, faculty, and staff families, as well as 54 children of families from the broader community. 

With tuition for children’s enrollment set at $530 per month, the program generates funds to cover the program’s operational costs, including the salaries of the program’s Office Assistant and classroom Aides.  Previous APRU’s have indicated that the funds generated through families tuition paid for children’s enrollment in Na Kama Pono have also been used to pay the salaries of the part-time Lecturers for the Early Education Program rather than funds from ECE student’s tuition paid to the College (a point that possibly needs re-visiting and clarification).  The salaries of the two full-time teachers and the one full-time faculty are paid from General Funds.

The ECE Program has experienced several transitions since the retirement of the long-time Director in 2009, with the Lead Preschool Teacher assuming the roles and responsibilities of overseeing the program, and teaching an ECE course in addition to her regular full-time responsibilities on an interim bases. In Spring 2012 a new ECE Faculty and Program Coordinator was hired but resigned at the end of the term.  The position was filled again with the new person beginning in August 2012.  

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: ECED

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 81 111 105 Unhealthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 2 1 5
3 *Number of Majors 23 35 31
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 208 262 220
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 57 24 49
6 SSH in All Program Classes 265 286 269
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 9 10 9
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 14 13 14

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
9 Average Class Size 6.3 7.3 6.4 Cautionary
10 *Fill Rate 58% 64% 58%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 1 1 1
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 23 35 31
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 14.4 23.1 19.5
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 1.6 1.5 1.6
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $301,527 $379,556 $435,426
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $301,527 $253,753 $195,845
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees Not Reported Not Reported $135,424
15 Cost per SSH $1,138 $1,327 $1,619
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 11 9 11

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 69% 85% 86% Healthy
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 9 3 3
19 *Persistence (Fall to Spring) 70% 64% 75%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 0 8 5
20a Degrees Awarded 0 4 0
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 0 4 5
21 External Licensing Exams Passed Not Reported Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 1 0 3
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 2
22b Transfers without credential from program 1 0 1

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
09-10 10-11 11-12
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollment Distance Education Classes 0 0 0
25 Fill Rate 0% 0% 0%
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 0% 0% 0%
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 0 0 0
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) 0% 0% 0%

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2010-2011
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.10 90.00 Not Met  
30 2P1 Completion 45.00 70.00 Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 56.00 85.00 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 51.00 75.00 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 16.25 2.78 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.15 0.00 Not Met
Last Updated: August 6, 2012
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

 

Action Plan Results for 2011-2012

·         The OCET II building was acquired to provide additional preschool classroom space, a small office space, and a small resource/storage space.  Part of the agreement for acquiring the building was that it also serves as classroom space in which ECE Program course could be held. The children’s play yard and area surrounding the OCET II building was fenced, and plans for adding a source of running water and children’s toileting/sink area is in conversation (possible funds from Facilities are being considered to make this necessary renovation to the building). The purchase of equipment, materials, and supplies for the additional classroom space was minimal and will be re-visited in the upcoming year.

·         The Hui Kilo Pohaku Group (a collaboration of ECE professionals and community) was formed and the establishment of a pilot program in which ECE lab students were placed in various preschools island wide was implemented. The lab students provided feedback in which they clearly indicated that while they valued gaining the perspective of working in another setting, they felt they would have been provided stronger mentoring and support at KCC’s Lab Preschool.

·         An Office Assistant was hired on a temporary basis and a search is underway to fill the position.

·         An on-going effort to change unhealthy indicators to healthy resulted in outreach to the community through brochures and visits to area high schools. One male student is enrolled in the ECE Program, and one male student is working part-time in the Lab Preschool.

·         Perkins funds were not applied for during 2011-2012.

Quantitative Indicators for 2011-2012

Overall Program Health:         Cautionary

Demand Indicators:                Unhealthy

Efficiency Indicators:             Cautionary

Effectiveness Indicators:        Healthy

 

Demand Indicators

      Kauai has the same need for quality early childhood education and care programs, family support, and other occupations to which graduation for the ECE Program prepares students.  However, Kauai is unique in that it is a small island community approximately thirty six to forty licensed preschool settings and a limited number of other organizations and agencies that employ a workforce with the training and experience gained by completion of KCC’s ECE Program. Though there may be few openings available at any given time on Kauai (the fact that people in positions directly working with children and families seem to have low turnover is actually a goal that the profession strives for in that it provides for consistency), there is a need for ongoing training and professional development among the workforce.

Many of the early education teachers and classroom assistants currently employed on Kauai are minimally trained with a Child Development Associate (CDA) which can be obtained through 120 contact hours of non-credit on-line training.  KCC offers an alternative to non-credit training through the Certificate of Competence consisting of the first three ECE courses which can be applied toward the CDA and later toward the AS Degree in Early Childhood Education. As Head Start, the largest employer of ECE teachers and support personnel on Kauai continues to move toward meeting the Federal training requirements outlined in Section 648A of the 1998 Head Start Act requiring 50% of the teachers to hold a Bachelor’s Degree, and classroom aides needing to first hold the CDA and then an AS Degree, KCC is positioned to continue with recruitment efforts to partner in improving this part of the workforce. In addition, the accreditation requirements of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), also requires teachers to continue their training towards a Bachelors Degree.  There are only a few accredited preschools on Kauai, including KCC’s Lab Preschool.  If there are to be more accredited preschools on the island, KCC will need to continue its role as the primary trainer of the early childhood education workforce.

            According to the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) 2010 Occupational Outlook Handbook located    at www.bls.ogr, the average salary for a preschool teacher (preschool teachers educate and care for children ages 2.5 to 5 years of age who have not yet entered kindergarten in public and private schools, centers, and organizations) entering the workforce with an Associate of Science Degree in Early Childhood Education in May 2010 was $25,700 with an average wage of $12.35 to $14.04 per hour.

 

            The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average growth rate for all occupations was 14% as of occupations as of April 2011.  The BLS projected that the job outlook for preschool teachers from 2010-2020 will be 25% faster than average, with job openings for preschool teachers growing much faster than most other careers (19%) from 2008-2018. According to CollegeBoard.org, this growth is driven by the fact that the number of children under five is rising, and that more mothers are working outside the home. As it becomes increasingly recognized that the early years are foundational to healthy growth and development, some states, such as Hawaii, are bringing into focus the idea of state funded ‘universal preschool’ for all 4 year olds whose families wish them to attend, which will demand a well trained workforce.

 

            In Hawaii, Senate Bill 2545 enacted legislation establishing the states first Executive Office of Early Learning with an appointed cabinet-level director was signed by Governor Neil Abercrombie on June 28, 2012.  “One of the goals of my administration was to ensue that there was a collaborative effort to see to it that every young child in Hawaii has access to high quality preschool”, Abercrombie said.  “Investing in the next generation is the wisest decision that we can make as a people, and this measure makes such an investment.  In addition to establishing the Executive Office of Early Learning and the Early Learning Advisory  Board, the measure repeals ‘junior kindergarten’ at the end of the 2014-2015 school year, and requires children be at least five years of age on July 31 to enter Kindergarten beginning in the school year 2014-2015. The commitment expressed by the Governor as well as the changes made by the enactment of Senate Bill 2545 will mean that there will be an even greater need for quality, accessible preschools staffed by a well-trained workforce throughout the state, including Kauai, for the many children who will not be age-ready to enter Kindergarten.

 

            Efficiency Indicators: Cautionary

 

            The Early Childhood Education Program had 31 students enrolled as majors for 2011-2012,

and classes have tended to be consistently small in size over the past several years (perhaps, as some students have suggested, due to the low visibility of the program placed alongside the Nursing Program rather than under the umbrella of an Education Department, limited promotion through the media and other venues, and certainly, as is acknowledged by the profession itself, historically low wages certainly at the entry point into the career). Even though courses might be under-enrolled, they are offered in a sequence once a year so that students can make progress, taught by a Lecturer from the community who receives a per-course salary that is adjusted according to the number of students enrolled.  One full-time ECE faculty teaches the three lab courses, and serves as program coordinator and director of the Lab Preschool.

 

            The Overall Program Budget Allocation for 2010-2011 was shown as $379,556, which reflects an accumulation of funds over several years beyond operating costs. As of the date of this report the Overall Program Budget Allocation for 2011-2012 was not shown on the Program Quantitative Indicators report.  In actuality, the Early Childhood Education Lab Preschool generates approximately $106,000 (20 children X $530 X 10 months) which is placed in ‘special funds’ to operate the Lab Preschool, including paying the salary of the CE Program office assistant, and the classroom aides. It has been noted in previous reports that Lecturers for the ECE Program courses are also paid with the ‘special funds’ generated by the children’s tuition at the Lab Preschool (rather than from the colleges General Funds which pay the salary of the one full-time faculty member and two APT’s-this is an area that would be useful to revisit and clarify in light of requests made for program improvement).

 

            Effectiveness Indicators: Healthy

 

            The Effectiveness data indicates that the persistence for 2011-2012 improved over the previous two years (70% to 75%), as did the successful rate of completion (69% to 86%). While no certificates were awarded (as some students have indicated there is little awareness among students that they can apply for the two program certificates along the way toward completion of the degree), 5 degrees were awarded with 3 students transferring to a UH 4 year program. It is worth noting that although the ECE Program has had a fewer number of students, there is a higher rate of successful completion compared to other ECE programs in the UH system.  Perhaps this can be attributed to smaller class size which can allow for more individual student attention and support from the instructor.

 

            Perkins

 

            Perkins funds were not applied for during the 2011-2012 year.

Part III. Action Plan

 

Program’s Goals and Relationship to the College’s Goals

Program Goal & Campus

Strategic Priority

 

Action Item

 

Resources

Needed

Person(s)

Responsible

Timeline

 

Improvement

Indicator

 

PLO

Impacted

 

Status

 

 

UH Goals 1,2,3,4,5

KCC Goals 1,2,3,4,5,6,

ECE Program Goals 1-6:

Action Plan Goals:

 

I. To provide accessible quality education and training on Kauai that prepares individuals to work in various capacities with young children birth to age eight.

 

 

 

 

II. To provide a teaching/learning environment, educational experience and student support-service that helps to recruit, retain, and support students toward meeting their career goals in early childhood education and related professions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A. Hold focus groups with ECE faculty to identify program strengths, areas for improvement

B. Continue to work to strengthen program indicators

 

 

A.  Repair/revitalize  the Lab School facility to reflect standards of best-practice in the field:

  1. Address staff space needs

  2. Address health, safety, sustainability  issues of buildings through repairs, upgrades

  3. Furnish, equip, & supply  the preschool classrooms to support student & children ‘s learning

  4. Design and develop a natural outside learning environment in the newly acquired yard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Funds from preschool tuition/budget & other sources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ECE Program

Coordinator

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ECE Program Coordinator, Preschool Teachers, & Facilities

 

 

 

 

 

a. By end of spring term

 

 

b. On-going

 

 

 

A. ASAP

 

 

 

 

 

a. Suggestions collected & discussed

 

 

b. Healthier indicators

 

 

 

Staff & children’s safety, health & well-being; ECE student success

1,2,3,4,5,6

 

 

 

 

 

On-going

 

 

 

CAMPUS  SLO’S: Kauai Community College

PROGRAM SLO’S:  ECE Program

COURSE SLO’S: ECE

1. Communication: Effectively use language and non-verbal communication consistent with and appropriate to the audience and purpose.

3. Build positive relationships and guide children through supportive interactions.

6. Build respectful partnerships with children, families, and their communities.

ENG 100, SP 151

ED 105, ED 110, ED 115, ED 131, ED 140, ED 192, ED 195, ED 245, ED 263

2. Cognition: Use critical thinking skills to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate ideas.

 

 

1.  Use knowledge of child development of individual children to create healthy, challenging learning environments and experiences.

2. Observe, document and assess children’s development and learning in partnership with families.

4. Plan, implement, and assess learning experiences using appropriate content, concepts, and methods.

ED 105, ED 110, ED 115, ED 131, ED 140, ED 192, ED 195, ED 245, ED 262

3. Information Competency: Conduct, present and use research necessary to achieve educational, professional, and personal objectives.

1.  Use knowledge of child development of individual children to create healthy, challenging learning environments and experiences.

ED 105, ED 110, ED 115, ED 131, ED 140, ED 192, ED 195, ED 245, ED 262

4. Social Responsibility: Interact with others demonstrating respect toward their opinions, feelings, and values.

3. Build positive relationships and guide children through supportive interactions.

. 6. Build respectful partnerships with children, families, and their communities.

ENG 100, SP 151

Hawaiian Studies

ED 105, ED 110, ED 115, ED 131, ED 140, ED 192, ED 195, ED 245

5. Personal Responsibility: Demonstrate self-management through practices that promote physical, mental, and emotional well-being.

5. Base decisions and actions on ethical and other professional standards.

7. Advocate for children and their families within the program.

ENG 100, SP 151

Fine Arts

Hawaiian Studies

ED 105, ED 110, ED 115, ED 131, ED 140, ED 192, ED 195, ED 245

 

Program Goal I

            A. Hold focus groups with ECE faculty to identify program strengths and areas for improvement.

 

            B. Continue to work to strengthen program indicators

Program Goal II-1 Repair/revitalize the Early Childhood Development Lab Preschool, Na Kama Pono to reflect best-practices in the field of early childhood education

            As the primary education and training site on Kauai preparing students to assume leadership roles in early childhood education and other professions working with children and families, KCC’s Early Childhood Education Program needs to take a leadership role in setting and maintaining the highest of standards in all aspects of the curriculum and the teaching/learning environment.  It is important to the recruitment, retention and training of early education students that the Early Childhood Development Lab Preschool as the demonstration and practicum site for ECE students presents an exemplary program that supports students, staff, children, and their families in a safe, healthy, and nurturing environment.  The following items addressed in the action plan will help to create the environment that will serve to model best-practice in the profession.

 

            A-1: Address staff space needs

 

            There is a need is for additional office/work space for the ECE Program staff which currently consists of the full-time ECE Program Coordinator/Director/Instructor, two full-time Preschool Teachers, the ECE Program Office Assistant, three part-time daily classroom Aides, and several ECE Lab Students on any given day of the week. Acquiring the OCET II building adjacent to the original preschool in July 2012 provided additional classroom space for the children (and presents opportunity for expansion of the children’s program to serve additional KCC student-parent families, faculty & staff after the building and play yard are made ready for additional children), ECE Program classroom space, a small storage space, and a small office space currently used by the ECE Program Coordinator. However, even with this addition, the office/work space for the staff is inadequate. 

 

            -The two teachers share a narrow, half-wall and glass 5’ X 16’ space designed to be an observation booth for lab students in the original preschool building. There are many health and safety issues with using this cramped space as office/work space for two individuals. There is only one entry/exit doorway at one end of the space which presents a potential safety hazard should the teacher at the far end need to escape in case of fire;  

the 12” wide shelf along the length of the space under the observation windows serves as             both teacher’s desk upon which their computers are placed, with only a couple of inches of shelf space that can be used for work space; ventilation and air circulation in the narrow space is extremely inadequate, requiring the use of small fans placed up high with extension cords extending along the wall to the nearest socket; the cramped space  requires the two teachers to sit so close together that they are bumping into each other, and breathing each other’s air, often complaining of headaches and sore throats; storage of materials, ECE student work, and necessary teaching supplies is problematic as having storage cabinets in the space reduces the already minimal square footage the two teachers are using.

 

            -The Office Assistant utilizes a similarly narrow space in the original building. This space was designed as office and the work space, and while adequate for one person, the space has reached it’s capacity with every cabinet, cupboard, and shelf packed.  There is a safety issue with the way that various cords and sockets are set up and exposed (the current Office Assistant was advised to not touch any one of the cords as doing so would impact the entire building’s electrical circuit).

 

            -Building additional multi-use space, or purchasing and bringing onsite, or relocating a small building (or two) that is not being used elsewhere on campus to the Lab Preschool would help to address space needs for the program.  The space could be placed in between or in back of the two classrooms, or built as an add-on to one of the existing buildings, providing office space for the ECE Program Coordinator and Office Assistant, allowing one teacher to move to the existing Office Assistant space, thus providing a more adequate, comfortable, and efficient work space for the other teacher. The small office in the OCET II building could then serve as the speech therapy and on-site staff -break room that is removed from children required by the program’s accreditation through the National Association for the Education of Young Children.

 

            A-2:  Address health, safety, sustainability issues of buildings through repairs/upgrades

 

            Guided by standards in the field of early education and care such as Department of Human Services licensing regulations and those set for the by the National Association for the Education of Young Children, operators of all child-care facilities are mandated to provide an environment that is safe, healthy, and sanitary at all times for young children. Leveled after Hurricane Iniki, Na Kama Pono was quickly rebuilt and after twenty some years of use is showing wear and tear with health and safety issues that need to be taken care of  in light of licensing and program accreditation.  In addition, a few upgrades will model sustainability ideas that can be used to improve health and safety.

 

            To address issues of mold and deterioration in the kitchen located in the original building, Plans for addressing issues of water leakage, mold, and deterioration in the kitchen located in the original building are under way with plans to have the upgrade completed in between terms (funds for the re-vitalizing of the areas are being used from some accumulated tuition money from the Lab Preschool).

 

            While the children have been using the classroom space in the newly acquired second building, there is no source of running water or toilet and sink facilities for the children. As need arises, children have been escorted back to the other classroom by staff to use the toilet, which is disruptive to their play and work, counter-productive to the philosophy of the program to nurture children’s independence and self-esteem, and problematic in inclement weather as there is no covered walkway attaching the two buildings. Children are currently drinking water from a portable water dispenser in the classroom. Discussion with the Facilities Department is underway to build this much needed, and required accommodation in the classroom.

 

            In addition to these two projects underway, several additional building areas need to be addressed to promote health, safety, and to begin to further to goal of campus-wide sustainability.  These include:

 

-The 20 plus year old carpeting in the original preschool classroom needs to be removed and a different, easily cleaned flooring such as tile or wood needs to be installed.  This is especially important as children use this area for rest-time every day.  As carpeting is a known source of allergens for young children, the carpeting in the second building should be taken out as well and a different floor covering installed.

-The windows in the second classroom present a safety hazard for children as they are cranked to roll out and upward with sharp edges at children’s eye level.  The windows need to be replaced with screened windows that slide horizontally to open to prevent any hazard to children.

            -Air circulation and quality is problematic in both buildings, requiring the extensive use of the air             conditioners.  Installing 3-4 ceiling fans in each classroom so that windows could be open and the fans             used, especially in the cooler winter months, would greatly improve ventilation and air quality. In             addition, the use of open windows and overhead fans is one small contribution to KCC’s efforts toward             a sustainable campus and modeling of sustainable practices for students and the community.

 

            A-3: Furnish, equip, & supply the preschool classrooms to support student & children s learning

 

            As with the carpet in the original preschool classroom, much of the furnishing, equipment, and materials used in the children’s program to promote children’s learning as well as for demonstration for the Lab students at the Lab Preschool has served well and is need of replacement (it is worth noting that some of the equipment and materials were actually rescued from the damage caused to the original classroom and play-yard!).

 

            A-4: Design and develop a natural outdoor learning environment in the newly acquired yard

 

            The newly acquired play yard in front of the OCET II building has been fenced.  Developing a plan to convert the space to a natural outdoor learning environment is the next step.  There are many resources, including the parents of Na Kama Pono, on campus that can be tapped into to bring native plants to the yard, build raised garden beds, construct walkways and wheel toy paths, gathering places, and other areas of interest.  A large shade canopy will need to be research, ordered and installed, as well as a shade tree planted.

Part IV. Resource Implications

 

 

            As mentioned previously, the Early Childhood Development Lab Preschool has some funds that have accumulated over the years that  can be used to purchase furniture, equipment, and materials needed for the preschool classrooms and natural outdoor environment, as well as contributing many of the health and safety issued that should be addressed to make the buildings and program appropriate to the needs of young children, staff, families, and students studying in the Early Childhood Education Program.  Any of the issues and improvements that can be addressed through ‘institutional responsibility’ or other sources of funding will be useful and appreciated in that monies in the program’s Special Funds can then be freed up for continued use by the Early Childhood Development Lab and the Early Childhood Education Program.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2011-2012 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Plan, implement and evaluate curriculum and learning environments for individual and groups of children based on knowledge of child development and its multiple influences to ensure that they promote health, safety, positive development, and learning for all children.

2

Yes
Assess children's progress using formal and informal observation and assessment tools and methods.

3

Yes
Communicate effectively and appropriately with children and adults from all backgrounds to build respectful, reciprocal relationships; use appropriate guidance practices with children.

4

Yes
Participate actively in planning and decision-making concerning the educational, physical, fiscal and human resources in classrooms and programs for children.

5

Yes
Base decisions and actions on ethical and other professional standards.

6

Yes
Demonstrate collaboration, critical thinking and reflection.

7

Yes
Advocate for children and their families in the classroom and the program.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

Lab school is accredited by NAEYC.

B) Expected Level Achievement

No content.

C) Courses Assessed

No content.

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Professional portfolio (ASK)

E) Results of Program Assessment

 

New PLOs:

 

  1. Plan, implement and evaluate curriculum and learning environments for individual and groups of children based on knowledge of child development and its multiple influences to ensure that they promote health, safety, positive development, and learning for all children.
  2. Assess children's progress using formal and informal observation and assessment tools and methods.
  3. Communicate effectively and appropriately with children and adults from all backgrounds to build respectful, reciprocal relationships; use appropriate guidance practices with children.
  4. Participate actively in planning and decision-making concerning the educational, physical, fiscal and human resources in classrooms and programs for children.
  5. Base decisions and actions on ethical and other professional standards.
  6. Demonstrate collaboration, critical thinking and reflection.
  7. Advocate for children and their families in the classroom and the program.

PLOs in the ECE program are evaluated within the context of each course as well as based on the professional portfolio (ASK) each student needs to complete in order to graduate with their associate’s degree. The standards they must meet are as follows

1.  Select and implement appropriate, effective teaching practices consistent with Hawaii 05 practice standards.

2.  Engage in observation and reflection as an ongoing part of planning and practice.

3.  Identify and apply understanding of child development, guidance, curriculum, working with families, professionalism, and program management.

4.  Document children’s learning and development

5.  Relate positively and effectively to children of different ages individually and in groups

6.  Communicate respectfully and clearly with families regarding their children and the program

7.  Communicate effectively and build positive relationships with co-workers.

F) Other Comments

No content.

G) Next Steps

No content.