University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kauai Community College
Program: Electronics Technology

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The last comprehensive review for this program can be viewed at:
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/arpd/instructional.php?action=analysis&college=KAU&year=2011&program=93
STEM Program

Program Description

The Electronics Technology program at Kauai Community College was created to meet the demand for technicians on the island of Kauai.  The curriculum offers basic electronics, computer maintenance, programming and networking technologies (IT, Imformation Technology) courses enabling graduates to qualify for entry-level technician or IT positions.  Elective courses in advanced networking are offered through the embedded Cisco Networking Academy.  Courses in fiber optics, RF, and photonics are also offered on an irregular schedule. Students completing the program exit by means of the COM (Certificate of Competence), the CC (Certificate of Completion), the CA (Certificate of Achievement), or with an AS (Associate in Science) degree and fulfill basic competencies enabling entry into the variety of jobs requiring knowledge of advanced technology. 

AS degree graduates may seek electronics technician positions or may choose to continue their education at baccalaureate electronics or computer engineering technology programs.  University of Hawaii Maui College offers a BAT (Bachelors in Applied Technology) in Electro-optics and the program is has articulated many of its courses with this program. Students planning on pursuing Bachelor’s degrees in electrical engineering or computer science are enrolled in the liberal arts program at Kauai Community College, but may take electronics courses as electives. Articulation to Electrical Engineering does not exist at this time, but the demand for graduates with a four year degree is growing due to ever advancing technologies. Statistical analysis of this need is included in this review. Students presently need to relocate to another island in order to pursue a four year degree, which continues to create a hardship for many.

This year the program has been undergoing a complete review of all its courses, renewing and revising all CSLOs, gaining approval from the Assessment Committee, and mapping all CSLOs to PSLOs, to ISLOs. Course content is modified as needed to reflect rapidly advancing technologies, and industrial affiliates have provided input to the program content. During this process, it became evident that in our modern society an AS degree is often not sufficient to obtain many high tech jobs, and that the need for graduates with a baccalaureate degree exceeds the need for an AS degreed person by a factor of 10 or more on the island of Kauai. This revelation will cause the ETRO program to undergo revisions to include more program offerings in the next year or two, in order that job placement indicators will improve.

Professional industry certification is an important employment criterion in the field of Information Technology (IT) along with education and experience. Funding has been acquired through the Perkins Grant to establish a Pearson VUE testing center at KCC. This will provide students a way of taking industry certification exams without flying to Honolulu.  Depending on the employer a student with an Associate’s degree plus one or more industry certifications, such as A+ and Cisco CCNA, can get an entry level position. However, for the higher paying positions a bachelor’s degree is desirable.  Some students attend the program only to prepare for industry certification and not a degree.  For them industry certification is their goal, but the system doesn’t treat that as a completion. This will skew the statistics for completion rates.

The Electronics Technology Program Mission Statement: The Program's mission is to produce graduates who are technically competent, can communicate and work with others effectively, demonstrate responsible citizenship, leadership and an awareness of the global context of their work.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: ET     Program CIP: 15.0303

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 114 12 11 Unhealthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 4 1 0
3 *Number of Majors 32.5 37 37.5
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 9 19 14
3b     Fall Full-Time 45% 41% 34%
3c     Fall Part-Time 55% 59% 66%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 6% 5% 14%
3e     Spring Full-Time 33% 52% 43%
3f     Spring Part-Time 67% 48% 58%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 18% 6% 8%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 283 331 330
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 281 373 303
6 SSH in All Program Classes 564 704 633
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 19 23 21
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 21 24 27

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 9.8 9.9 8.1 Cautionary
10 *Fill Rate 74.5% 76.2% 60.1%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 2 2 1
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 16.2 18.5 37.5
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 15.4 14.1 13.0
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 2.1 2.6 2.9
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $177,273 $198,876 $177,233
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $177,273 $193,721 $173,333
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $5,155 $3,900
15 Cost per SSH $314 $282 $280
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 8 12 16
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 85% 68% 82% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 5 12 11
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 72.7% 58.5% 74.2%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     48.5%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 11 9 22
20a Degrees Awarded 8 5 4
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 12 9 38
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 2 1 3
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 1 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 2 0 3

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes N/A N/A N/A
25 Fill Rate N/A N/A N/A
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) N/A N/A N/A
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) N/A N/A N/A
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) N/A N/A N/A

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 85.71 Not Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 42.86 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 78.57 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 60.00 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 14.71 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 33.33 Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     4  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     1
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     4
38 Number of Pell Recipients     22
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     3
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

In this section, the Electronic Technology program’s strength and weakness are analyzed in terms of demand, efficiency, and effectiveness. The analysis is performed with respect to the single permitted CIP code of 15. 0303, but since this is overly restrictive and not representative of all Program Outcomes, additional analysis is performed using data obtained from the Hawaii State Department of Labor and Industrial Relations' Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW)  and  Current  Employment  Statistics  (CES) programs, as compiled by the Hawaii Workforce Infonet, www.hiwi.org.  It is also noted that this year was a transition year for the program, as Dr. Francis Takahashi retired and Dr. Shirong Du departed. Dr. Georgeanne Purvinis Friend replaced Dr. Takahashi in the fall, and Mark Anderson joined in January. Some program indicators are affected by this change and discussed below.

Demand Indicators - Unhealthy

Demand Indicators are unhealthy again this year, and have been unhealthy since two years ago when only one CIP code was allowed to compute this metric. Students graduating from the Electronics Technology program can not only have jobs as electronic technicians (CIP  15.0303, SOC code 17-3023), but they are also qualified to have jobs as Computer Support Specialists (SOC code 15-1150) and electrical and electronic equipment mechanics, installers and repairers (SOC 49-2000). These are shown below in Table II-1. Additionally, there were 21 FTEs enrolled in program classes, but there were 3 transfers to UH 4 year degree programs. Thus, 14 % of the students were seeking a 4 year degree, not an Electronic Technology degree, and the job market for these students is not being accounted for in the demand indicators. The demand for the program to prepare students for entry into a 4 year program is not included, but needs to be accounted for.

 

The Demand Indicator also states there were no positions available in Kauai County for graduates. However, in reality, the program graduated 4 students: one is now employed by PMRF as an electronic technician, one is employed by Hawaiian Telecom as a technician, and one has transferred to a 4 year program. Clearly the statistics of zero available jobs is not accurate. 

 

In regards to what we feel the Demand Indicator ought to reflect, the program graduates are qualified for jobs as electrical and electronic technicians (SOC 17-3023), drafters (SOC 17-3012),  electrical and electronic equipment mechanics, installers, and repairers (SOC 49-2000), and computer support specialists (SOC 15-1150). See Table II-1. These professions require a 2 year associates degree or less. However, even considering those additional job codes, we find that the current demand indicator will still be unhealthy. Long term occupational forecasts from www.hiwi.org for Kauai County indicate current employment and projected, and shows somewhat better demand than that indicated by the single CIP code; however, ultimately the demand for positions requiring only an associate degree in electronics technology is shrinking, as more and more high tech positions require graduates with a 4 year degree as technologies have become increasing complex. The table below indicates that a forecasted total of 20 new jobs net is anticipated between 2010 and 2020, or approximately 2 jobs per year. (average annual openings not calculated in chart, just employment positions forecasted were tabulated. This is likely due to the inaccuracies of working with small data sets) 

Table II-1. Relevants AS degree occupational forecast

LONG TERM OCCUPATIONAL PROJECTIONS, KAUAI COUNTY, 2010-2020, www.hiwi.org
    Employment Growth Avg. Ann. Average Annual Openings BLS Education and Training Values
SOC Code Occupation Title 2010 2020 Net Percent Growth Growth Replacement Total Education  Work Exper. Job Training 
15-1150 Computer Support Specialists 80 90 10 13.3% 1.3% ** ** ** Some college, no degree None Moderate-term OJT
17-3012 Electrical and Electronics Drafters 20 20 0 5.9% 0.6% 0 0 0 Associate's degree None None
49-2000 Electrical and Electronic Equipment Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers 40 40 10 18.9% 1.9% ** ** **      
 

 

Table II-1 summarized the demand for AS degreed people who graduated from our program. As the outlook is poor, this review includes an analysis of the forecasted demand for baccalaureate degrees in engineering and computer fields for Kauai. The table below (Table II-2) indicates that for Kauai County, it is expected that an average of 10 annual openings for Computer Specialists (which includes sub categories of programmers, network administrators, etc.) and 10 annual openings for various engineering specialties will be available. Clearly, Kauai Community College is not presently able to fulfill this anticipated need and should grow its program into a pre-engineering and computer science program.

Table II-2. Relevant bachelor degree long term occupational forecasts

LONG TERM OCCUPATIONAL PROJECTIONS, KAUAI COUNTY, 2010-2020
    Employment Growth Avg. Ann. Average Annual Openings BLS Education and Training Values
SOC Code Occupation Title 2010 2020 Net Percent Growth Growth Replacement Total Education  Work Exper. Job Training 
15-1000 Computer Specialists 270 340 70 26.3% 2.6% 10 10 10      
15-1121 Computer Systems Analysts 30 30 10 22.2% 2.2% ** 0 ** Bachelor's degree None None
15-1131 Computer Programmers 30 40 10 16.1% 1.6% 0 ** ** Bachelor's degree None None
15-1133 Software Developers, Systems Software 40 60 20 54.1% 5.4% ** 0 ** Bachelor's degree None None
15-1142 Network and computer systems architects and administrators 30 40 10 30.0% 3.0% ** 0 ** Bachelor's degree None None
15-1179 Information Security Analysts, Web Developers, and Computer Network Architects 40 50 10 37.1% 3.7% ** 0 ** Bachelor's degree 1-5 yrs. None
15-1799 Computer Occupations, All Other 20 20 0 13.3% 1.3% 0 0 0 Bachelor's degree None None
17-2000 Engineers 180 190 20 10.9% 1.1% ** ** 10      
17-2051 Civil Engineers 50 50 0 8.2% 0.8% 0 ** ** Bachelor's degree None None
17-2061 Computer Hardware Engineers 20 20 10 27.8% 2.8% 0 0 0 Bachelor's degree None None
17-2071 Electrical Engineers 30 30 0 13.8% 1.4% 0 ** ** Bachelor's degree None None
17-2072 Electronics Engineers, Except Computer 40 40 0 2.6% 0.3% 0 ** ** Bachelor's degree None None
17-2199 Engineers, All Other 30 30 0 15.4% 1.5% 0 ** ** Bachelor's degree None None

 

Efficiency Indicators – Cautionary

Two categories caused the Efficiency Indicator to be cautionary. First, the fill rate was only 60.1 % and 75% is required to be healthy. The year 2012-13 was a transition year, due to the retirement of Dr. Takahashi and the departure of Dr. Du, and recruitment into the program likely was not actively pursued. This statistic will change next year, as enrollment has increased. The other category causing an unhealthy rating was the student/faculty ratio, which was too high. This is due to the fact that the fall semester only had one full time faculty (again due to Dr. Takahashi’s retirement and Dr. Du’s departure). However, in January new faculty was hired, so the department again now has two full time faculty members and this category should no longer be cautionary.

 

Effectiveness received a cautionary also for persistence. The programs persistence fall to spring was 74.2 % but 75% is required for a healthy rating, so the program is very close. The other metric involves using line 22 (degrees and certificates) and dividing by line 2, new and replacement positions, which is zero. This is actually unhealthy, so it is reiterated that the program ought to evolve into a pre-engineering/computer science program. Another piece of data supporting the need for a pre-engineering program is the fact that 3 students transferred to a 4 year program, but without credentials from the Electronic Technology program. This indicates the present program was not able to provide a full 2 year preparatory program for the engineering degree these students were seeking.

 

Perkins IV Core Indicators

Technical Skills Attainment and Completion measures were both not met this year. Usually, the reason for a student stopping program participation is personal. As the class sizes are small, losing a student seriously affects statistics. For example in one class two students stopped participation for family reasons (financial support of a child and multiple deaths in family). Non-traditional participation is a difficult indicator to meet in Electronics Technology, as this is a traditional male-dominated field. One of the department’s new faculty, Dr. Georgeanne Purvinis Friend, is serving as a female exemplar and mentor, and currently there are two females enrolled in the program. It is the goal that her example will encourage more non-traditional participation.

Part III. Action Plan

The “Indicator of Improvement” column should identify and quantify the outcomes expected from the action item by using the actual numbers from the quantitative indicators table in Part I, according to the template for this review.  However, it is noted that the quantitative indicators are not aligned with all the UH goals and college goals above. Thus a program and college goal may involve sustainability and health and safety (UH goal 5, KCC goal 5), but no quantitative indicator exists for which to measure the improvement. Another example is that UH Goal 3 (KCC goal 6) addresses diversity and global contexts, but no quantitative indicator exists to measure improvement.

Action items are generally striving to restructure and build the Electronics Technology program so that it is technically aligned with industry and current technologies. Aged and broken equipment is a factor in student success; therefore the action items seek to improve the educational environment and promote student retention and success (Perkins 1P1, and 2P1). Nontraditional participation is currently being addressed as the program now has female faculty serving as an example, plus the other new faculty has significant experience with encouraging women in Information Technology. By supporting the program needs and faculty, it is believed the nontraditional participation metric (5P1) will be met in the future.

Program Goal & Campus

Strategic

Priority or Goal/ Perkins Core Indicator

Action Item

Resources Needed

Person(s) Responsible

Timeline

Indicator of Improvement

PLO impacted

Status

ETRO program goal 3, 7

 

Perkins 1P, 2P

Refurbish electronics supply to be compliant with ROHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances) electronics fabrication and assembly and for Surface Mount Device technologies

$$ - Solder flux,

Solder, tips

Dispensers,

Cleaners,

Tools for SMT

 

 

Friend

Purchase items and incorporation into curriculum by Fall 2013 upon receipt of funds

Quantitative indicators are not tied to UH Goal 5, but this Action Item is directly tied to Goal 5 in that it addresses Health and Safety Issues and promotes sustainability. 

 

 

1, 2, 3, 6

Safe and viable chemicals presently not part of program supplies. SMT not presently supported but mandatory in the electronics industry.

ETRO program goal 1,3

 

Perkins 1P, 2P

Develop pre-engineering program outline and pursue articulation agreement. Investigate developing a BSET program.

$$- Several trips to UH Manoa Engineering department.

 

Additional engineering faculty to teach statics, dynamics.

Friend

2 years

Job placement will ultimately improve, (from 0 jobs to an average of 10 per year) but not until the quantitative indicator metrics are modified to support the new program offerings. 

1, 2, 3

Analysis of the program quantitative indicators clearly indicates need for new curriculum to support forecasted jobs requiring baccalaureate degrees.

ETRO program goal 1,3

 

Perkins 1P, 2P

Develop a Computer Specialist program that will transfer to a baccalaureate transfer program  (emphasis on network technologies and explore programming options)

Initially additional lectures leading to FTE instructors.

Anderson

2 years

Job placement will ultimately improve, (from 0 jobs to an average of 10 per year)  but not until the quantitative indicator metrics are modified to support the new program offerings. 

1, 2, 3

Analysis of the program quantitative indicators clearly indicates need for new curriculum to support forecasted jobs requiring baccalaureate degrees.

KCC Goal 3

 

Perkins 1P, 2P

Re-upholster or replace lobby furniture

$$

Anderson/Friend

2013-2014

Quantitative indicators are not tied to KCC goal 3, but this Action Item is directly tied in that it addresses Health and Safety Issues. The lobby area also promotes team functioning and provides an environment for the diversity of students to comfortably interact.

4

Furniture was originally donated by a doctor’s office many years ago. The vinyl has become sticky with age (not cleanable) and is likely unhealthy. It is also an embarrassment for the Daniel K. Inouye Technology Center.

ETRO program goal 3, 7

 

Perkins 1P, 2P

220 VAC connection in optics lab

$$

Friend

2013-2014

Improves job placement for AS degreed graduates.

1, 2, 3

Optics lab cannot power up some lasers donated by Boeing, which limits the optics course.

ETRO program goal 3, 7

 

Perkins 1P, 2P

Electronics test equipment – function generators

13 BK Precision Function generators at $250 each.

Friend

Fall 2013

Improves retention and transfer rates, as students will be able to accomplish experiments and labs with equipment that predictably functions

1, 2, 3

Our 25 year old Heathkit function generators/ DC supplies are failing, thus electronics classes cannot build and test circuits. Very frustrating for students and faculty.

ETRO program goal 3, 7

 

Perkins 1P, 2P

Electronics test equipment – DC power supplies

13 BK Precision DC power supplies at $265 each.

Friend

Fall 2013

Improves retention and transfer rates, as students will be able to accomplish experiments and labs with equipment that predictably functions

1, 2, 3

Our 25 year old Heathkit function generators/DC supplies are failing, thus electronics classes cannot build and test circuits. Very frustrating for students and faculty.

ETRO program goal 3, 7

 

Perkins 1P, 2P

Replace damaged and worn-out Ethernet cabling fabrication and testing equipment

8 Ethernet cabling fabrication kits with testing meters. $250 each.

Anderson

Spring 2014

Improves retention and transfer rates, as students will be able to accomplish experiments and labs with equipment that predictably functions

1, 2, 3

Present equipment has corroded and deteriorated over many years. Ex: a dozen cable testers were thrown out due to electronic corrosion and damage from constant usage.   

ETRO program goal 3, 7

 

Perkins 1P, 2P

Upgrade Cisco routers to current model required by new updated Cisco Networking Academy curriculum.  

Minimum of 15 Cisco 1941 routers (prefer 20)

$1150 each.

 

Anderson

Spring 2014

Improves retention and transfer rates, as students will be able to accomplish experiments and labs with equipment that predictably function and match the Lab instructions.

1, 2, 3

Present equipment is outdated (Cisco no longer sells it) and doesn’t properly support the new curriculum. All examples and instructions in curriculum and lab manuals don’t match current equipment.  

ETRO program goal 3,7

Perkins -all

Replace classroom projectors 3 projectors Anderson/Friend Fall 2014 Improves retention, as students will now be able to read slides all Present equipment is low resolution and dull. Details of slide presentations can not be discerned. One of the projectors is malfunctioning.

ETRO program goal 9

KCC goal 6

Send faculty and students to Japan sister colleges financial (airfare and accommodations) Friend & the International Education Coordinator Ikeda 2013-2014 year Advance discipline specific knowledge through international collaboration and partnerships all, but especially 4, 6 intial contacts and international relationship is established

Part IV. Resource Implications

The following resources are requested in support of the action items:

Priority

Resource Item

Qty

Cost

Total

Justification

1

Function generators (sine wave, square wave, etc.)

13

$250

Shipping $100

$3350

Pricing from Digikey.com

2

DC Power supplies

13

$265

Shipping $100

$3445

Pricing from Digikey.com

5

ROHS and SMT fabrication and assembly items

varies

 

$1200

On line pricing of parts and chemicals

4

Ethernet cable fabrication kits

8

$250 each plus shipping

$2500

+ tx/sh

Online pricing

3

Cisco 1941 Routers

15

$1150 plus shipping

$17250

+ tx/sh

Online pricing

6 Faculty and student support for international collaboration 7= 6 top students + 2 faculty airfare + shared accomodations + food allowance = $3000/person $24000 online pricing

8

Lobby furniture recovering

 

 

$3000

Local upholsterer estimate

7 classroom projectors 3 1950 $5850 on line pricing

 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Demonstrate an appropriate mastery of the knowledge, techniques, and skills in the use of contemporary tools of electronics technology.

2

Yes
Demonstrate theoretical and technical knowledge of components, systems, and control processes that govern the outcomes of systems for purposes of operation, maintenance, and improvement.

3

Yes
Apply current technical knowledge in the analysis and solution of technical problems.

4

Yes
Function effectively on teams interacting with all levels of personnel, fully participating, and adding to the dynamics of the group

5

Yes
Communicate effectively orally, in writing, and by means of the various electronic communication devices.

6

Yes
Exhibit professional, ethical, and social responsibilities showing a respect for diversity and an awareness of contemporary professional, societal, and global issues.

7

Yes
Explain the importance of commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous professional improvement in adapting to emerging technologies.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

Meetings with PMRF staff and local high tech companies indicate that course offerings need to include more computer networking and programming skills, and that 4 year degrees are primarily sought.

B) Expected Level Achievement

PSLOS are assessed generally at 70 percent. However, PSLOs are not directly assessed but rather CSLOs and assessments are translated into PSLO assessment. Since all CSLOs were reviewed this year, and mapped to PSLOs, futures years will indicate PSLO assessment.

C) Courses Assessed

All courses underwent assessment committee review this year and were revised as appropriate. All CSLOs are assessed when they are taught.  ETRO 18, ETRO 140B, ETRO 140C, ETRO 122, ETRO 240B, ETRO 240C, and ETRO 280 were assessed in 2012-2013. The chart below shows the % of completing students reaching the benchmark. These CSLOs map directly to the PSLOs.  <unable to insert>

 

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument


  1.  

NO.

How is it assessed?

1

Hands-on skills with hand/power tools, meters, instrumentation, and software; demonstrated by projects, tests, practical labs

2

Technical knowledge and critical thinking skills as applied to systems, operations and development; demonstrated by projects, tests, practical labs

3

Technical knowledge and critical thinking skills as applied  to troubleshooting; demonstrated in lab environments

4

Workplace skills--Work ethic, initiative, leadership, team player; demonstrated in lab and group environments

5

Communication demonstrated in projects, computer submissions, oral presentations

6

Ethics, diversity, awareness with sensitivity and respect toward others.

7

Life long learning, adaptability, and an ingrained consciousness toward quality, thoroughness and attention to detail.

E) Results of Program Assessment

See item C.

F) Other Comments

The cost of teaching high technology courses involves costly consumables that have to be purchased prior to many of the ETRO classes. Examples: ETRO 18, 120L, 121, and 122L require over a $100 of components, solder, solder iron tips, etc. per student per class.  At least two classes (ETRO 140B and 121 require cable fabrication end-connectors, jacks, cables, etc. These classes also have tools and parts that have a limited life span, such as the WAN modules in the Cisco routers wear out from constant use.  The funding we get from the division is not enough to cover these costs.  Our solution is to start charging Lab Fees for most of the ETRO classes.

 

G) Next Steps

As stated in the review, the need for graduates with a baccalaureate degree in engineering or a computer specialist field far exceeds the need for electronic technicians with an Associate Degree in Kauai, which is a reflection of our rapidly changing and advancing society. Therefore the current program needs to grow its technology and degree offerings to support the anticipated needs for engineers, computer programmers, and IT professionals with baccalaureate degrees.  In particular, three new program offerings need to be vetted as to the best routes to pursue, given the resources and enrollment numbers in Kauai. These are: an AA degree in pre-engineering and AA degree in pre-computer science, and a BS in Engineering Technology degree.