University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kauai Community College
Program: Hospitality and Tourism

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2011, and can be viewed at:
http://info.kauai.hawaii.edu/admin/prapru.htm#pr

Program Description

To provide quality education in Hotel Operations which will prepare students for a career in the Hospitality Industry or for transfer to a bachelor’s degree in Travel Industry Management; to promote positive work ethic, self esteem and attitudes stressing curiosity, accountability, cultural understanding, quality and productivity, positive interpersonal skills, hotel and customer service skills, and professionalism; and to support students in achieving their goals.

The Hospitality and Tourism program at Kauai Community College is designed to ensure student success in their chosen hospitality careers. The program is designed to meet the needs of those who are already employed in the hospitality services industry, as well as those who wish to prepare themselves for entry into this global field. We welcome you to experience the diversity and professionalism that make this career choice a sustainable opportunity.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: HOPE,HOST     Program CIP: 52.0901

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 110 101 117 Cautionary
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 10 12 14
3 *Number of Majors 33.5 46 59.5
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 13 13 23
3b     Fall Full-Time 56% 41% 55%
3c     Fall Part-Time 44% 59% 45%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 7% 3%
3e     Spring Full-Time 52% 43% 38%
3f     Spring Part-Time 48% 57% 62%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 6% 4% 2%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 296 421 523
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 783 852 672
6 SSH in All Program Classes 1,079 1,273 1,195
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 36 42 40
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 23 24 23

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 15.7 17.7 17.4 Cautionary
10 *Fill Rate 66.3% 76% 74%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 0 1
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 0 59.5
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 13.9 18.3 24.3
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 2.4 2.5 2.4
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $4,237 $65,135 $94,175
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $4,237 $63,705 $92,614
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $1,430 $1,561
15 Cost per SSH $4 $51 $79
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 5 3 1
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 69% 72% 70% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 27 34 25
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 54.5% 77.5% 69.8%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     43.6%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 11 9 26
20a Degrees Awarded 4 4 11
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 1 0 2
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 6 5 28
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 0 1 1
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 1 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 0 0 1

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 7 8 8  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes 145 174 148
25 Fill Rate 83% 87% 74%
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 61% 67% 53%
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 12 17 11
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) 63% 72% 72%

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 88.24 Not Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 29.41 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 67.74 Not Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 69.23 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation N/A N/A N/A
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion N/A N/A N/A

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     13  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     4
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
38 Number of Pell Recipients     45
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     1
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

According the 2013 Instructional Annual Report of Program Date, the HOST Program is Cautionary for the academic year 2012-13.

The Demand Indicator is ranked at Cautionary. The numbers of New & Replacement Positions in the State and County have increased by approximately 15% over the previous year; however, the Number of Majors has increased by 23%. The HOST program is producing more graduates than available positions in the County. While a 23% increase in the number of majors is welcomed, graduates may have difficulty in job placement. However, since we are limited to only one SOC code, I believe the industry has many career opportunities in addition to the one SOC code. The number of Native Hawaiian Majors has also increased by approximately 77.5% over the 2011-12 year, which is very exciting as one of our system and campus goals is to increase Native Hawaiian enrollment.  The number of Fall Full-Time has also increased by 14% over 2011-12. The numbers in Fall Part-time, Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in the system and Spring Full-Time have decreased from the previous year by 14%, 4%, and 5% respectively. There is a 5% increase over last year in the Spring Part-Time enrollment.  The decrease in numbers is fairly small, and it appears that growth in the Fall Full-Time correlates to the decrease in the Fall Part-Time numbers.

The SSH Program Majors in Program Classes also increased by 24% over the previous year; however, the number of SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes decreased by almost 21%. The SSH in All Program Classes are about 6% lower than the previous year.  FTE Enrollment in Program Classes was down about 5% and the Total Number of Classes Taught went from 24 to 23. Over the past three years, the number of Program Majors and Native Hawaiian majors has shown positive growth; however, the number of positions available in the State and County has remained relatively flat.

The Efficiency Indicator is rated at Cautionary.  The average class size has only decreased by .3 and the Fill Rate has decreased by 2% from 2011-12 to 2012-13. The FTE BOR Appointed Faculty number has been corrected to reflect the one faculty member. The number of Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty has increased by 6%.  And, once again this year illustrates a positive trend in the Number of Low-Enrolled Classes in that it has decreased from 3 to 1 over the previous year. In 2011-12, there was also a positive decrease in low enrolled classes from 5 to 3. This indicator is in line with since the increase in the number of majors is reflected in less low enrolled classes, while the Fill Rate and Average Class Sizes remain about the same. It is interesting to note that in comparison to the LAH ARPD, the HOST program fared better and yet LAH is rated as Healthy in the Efficiency Indicators. For example, In Average Class size, the HOST program went down .3 percent to 17.4: LAH's Average Class size is 16.6 and it is down from the year before. In Fill Rate, the HOST program went down 2% to 74%; LAH was also down from the year before and their Fill Rate is 72.4%, lower than HOST. In Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty, HOST is at 59.5, LAH is at 29. In the Number of Low-enrolled Classes, the HOST program went down from 3 to 1; LAH went up from 34 to 48. Perhaps the data is skewed due to the fact that the HOST program is considerably small compared to LAH; however, it does seem odd that the more positive indicators in HOST are still listed as Cautionary in comparison to LAH.

The Effectiveness Indicators contains a mixed bag. On the downside, the Successful Completion rate dipped by 2%; however, there is a positive trend in the number of Withdrawals. The number of Withdrawals has declined from year to year, with a substantial drop from the previous year of 27%. Basically, there were 27% less withdrawals over the previous year, which is good news. The Persistence from Fall to Spring dropped by about 7.7% too, which needs to be addressed.  While the data shows a drop in the Persistence from Fall to Spring and a small dip in the Successful Completion rate, the lower number of Withdrawals may indicate that students are attempting to complete classes, but are not receiving a C or higher in the classes. That may affect their decision to persist from Fall to Spring as they may need to repeat a course.

While the Effectiveness Indicators are deemed Cautionary, there is a lot of good news on the amounts of Degrees and Certificates Awarded. Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded increased over the previous year by 190%; the number of awards went from 9 to 26, which is incredible for a relatively small program. Positive indicators are reflected in the number of Degrees Awarded, which increased by 170%, or from 4 to 11. The Certificates of Achievement awarded went from zero to 2 and the number of Other Certificates Awarded skyrocketed from 5 to 28 over the previous year. Transfers to UH 4-yr and Transfers with and without credential from program remained relatively flat. Overall, I feel the Cautionary Effectiveness Call focuses on very minor indicators and discounts the tremendous success in the Completion of Degrees and Certificates.

In Distance Education, the Number of Courses Taught remains unchanged; however, enrollments decreased. This may be attributed to the increase in online course offerings from other disciplines and system campuses. Consequently, the Fill Rate was also affected. The Successful Completion also significantly decreased. This may be attributed to the fact that as more courses are offered via distance education, students may be electing to pursue these classes although they are unprepared for the rigor of online learning. It appears that the number of Withdrawals has decreased significantly, so students may be opting to stay the course rather than withdraw even though their grades are lower. The Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) remained at 72%. At least there was no negative change in that indicator.

The Perkins IV Core Indicators for 2011-12 need improvement. The program did not meet the goals set for Technical Skills Attainment, Completion, Student Retention or Transfer. Further investigation as to the cause of these low performance indicators will need to be addressed in light of the fact that there was a substantial increase in the amount of Degrees and Certificates Awarded. The correlation between these two indicators appears to be skewed.  The new Performance Funding indicator is a new addition.

Overall, even though the HOST Program is listed as Cautionary, there are many triumphs over last year mainly in the growth in majors, the substantial increase in the number of Native Hawaiian Majors, the escalation in the number of Degrees and Certificates Awarded, and a drop in the number of Low-enrolled classes and Withdrawals.  These are significant strengths in the program and positive indicators over the previous years. The weaknesses, though relatively minor, focus on the Fill Rate, Persistence, and the Successful Completion of classes. The slight drops in these areas do need to be addressed by the Program Coordinator (PC). Additionally, the PC may seek funding to increase the attainment of Perkins IV Core Indicator goals.

As per last year’s action plans, the new HOST PAR was initiated as of Fall 2013. The curriculum is strengthened to facilitate transferability to four-year institutions. Additionally, the HOST program has updated the General Education (GenEd) Course offerings in line with ACCJC requirements. This may impact HOST majors negatively as students enrolled in CTE programs may struggle with the higher level of GenEd requirements. This may need to be addressed via additional sources of tutoring and mentoring as well as the development of courses that incorporate new learning strategies.

 

Part III. Action Plan

UH System, KCC and/or Program Goals

Action Item

Resources Needed

Person(s) Responsible

Timeline

Indicator of Improvement

PLO impacted

Status

UH Goal 1: Educational Effectiveness and KCC Goal 1 Access and KCC Goal 2 Learning and Teaching

Recruit Native Hawaiian students

Increase number of NH majors by 25%

External funding; support from external NH agencies

Candace Tabuchi

Spring 2014 to Fall 2015

Number of majors will increase from 23 to 28

All

 

Increase success of non-traditional students in CTE programs

Identify student population that may be non-traditional and seek ways to improve Perkins Core Indicators  on Technical Skills Attainment and Completion

Unidentified

Candace Tabuchi

Jon Kalk

Spring 2014

Improve Perkins Core Indicators by 5-10%

All

 

 Increase and improve design and delivery of distance education offerings

Develop HOST and/or Business –related distance education  courses and certificates to improve  Perkins Core Indicators  on Technical Skills Attainment and Completion

Assigned time or summer overload

Candace Tabuchi

 Spring 2015

  Improve Perkins Core Indicators by 5-10%

PLO 3

ongoing

 Increase and improve design and delivery of distance education offerings

Develop strategies to increase rates in Successful Completion and Persistence from Fall to Spring

Assigned time and funding

Candace Tabuchi

Fall 2014

Upon implementation of developed strategies, will increase Completion Rates by 10% and Persistence by 3%

PLO 3

Pending; may be dependent upon external funding

 Increase overall retention and persistence to graduation and transfer

Initiate plan to update the A.A.S. in HOST to an A.S. in HOST

Assigned time

Candace  Tabuchi

Complete in Fall 2014

Double  transfers to 4-year in the year following implementation

 All

Initiated discussions with colleagues and started on document

Increase transfer rates by strengthening four-year pathways, particularly in STEM fields and Improve partnerships with K-12 to improve college preparation and to ensure that students are aware of specific opportunities that KCC provides.

 

Obtain BOR approval for  the AS Business

Assigned time

Candace Tabuchi

Fall 2014

Will increase transfer rates to 4-year institutions

None

Will present the AS in Business proposal to the CCOAO in November 2013

UH Goal 2: A Learning, Research, and Service Network and KCC Goal 5 Community Development

Revised Curriculum to increase education capital for the States’ economy

Obtain system approval to move the HOST program from an AAS to an AS in HOST as a three campus joint effort

Assigned time

Candace Tabuchi

Hawaii CC Program Coordinator  and Maui College Program Coordinator

Fall 2014-Spring 2015

Will double transfer rates to 4-year institutions in the year following implementation

All

Began work on document process for AAS to AS in HOST program

UH Goal 3: A Model Local, Regional, and Global University and KCC Goal 6 Diversity

Increase Enrollment and Foster Global understanding  and Intercultural Competence of International students

Work with IEC and International Coordinator to define the framework for program internships

Assigned Time

Candace Tabuchi

Fall 2014-Spring 2015

Will define the framework and develop a  plan for implementation

PLO 4 & 5

ongoing

UH Goal 4: Investment in Faculty , Staff, Students, and their Environment and KCC Goal 4 Personal Development Strategic Goals

To increase entrepreneurial opportunities for program majors, and to promote green jobs (sustainability).

Develop an ecotourism course and a new certificate. Submit curriculum documents by Spring 2015.

Assigned time or summer overload

Candace Tabuchi

One-two years

Increase certificates awarded by 5%.

PLO 5

 

Part IV. Resource Implications

No content.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Effectively and purposely use verbal and nonverbal language about HOST topics with confidence and appropriate to the audience.

2

Yes
Use critical thinking skills to effectively synthesize and evaluate information from assigned readings and articles through written memos, reports, reflective notes, and essay exams.

3

Yes
Conduct presentation projects that include Internet research and visual media.

4

Yes
Interact with others through team-building speeches and visual-oral presentations, which are designed to promote teamwork solutions and teach teamwork principles. Values such as respect for diversity, the need for fairness, empathy, and human dignity are stressed.

5

Yes
Demonstrate self-management related to the Hospitality industry through practices that promote physical, mental, and emotional health.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

The HOST Program is not involved in external accreditation; however, the program does have an industry advisory committee that meets annually to discuss program goals and effectiveness. The HOST program also works with the HOST PCC to articulation progam goals and align program courses.

B) Expected Level Achievement

n/a

C) Courses Assessed

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Course

Methods of Assessment

HOST 101

Essay tests: Exams consist of essay and multiple choice questions, and case studies: Case studies are conducted both individually, in small groups, and included in unit exams. Capstone experience: The student project presentation requires research, organization, analysis of industry concepts, and a student presentation.


HOST 125

Class is based on lectures, group discussions, and case studies.  Student participation is required in a community service project.  Problem-based learning through real-world case studies, critical thinking questions, and issue updates help students apply chapter material.


HOST 150

The course content is based on lectures, group discussions, and role-playing. Student participation and hands-on learning are addressed through the Chapter and Task Demonstration Presentation. Problem-based learning is incorporated through critical thinking based on case study analyses. 


HOST 152

The course content is based on lectures, group discussions, and role-playing. Student participation is required through the simulation exercises and registration performance show.  Problem-based learning is addressed through critical thinking based on case study analyses.


HOST 154

Essay tests: Exams consist of essay and multiple choice questions, and case studies: Case studies are conducted both individually, in small groups, and included in unit exams. Capstone experience: The student project presentation requires research, organization, analysis of industry concepts, and a student presentation. Students will participate in a front and back of house service experience.


HOST 193V

Students in this course will be working and therefore will receive on-the-job training. This includes all the different ways of learning while on the job. Students will be keeping weekly journals, submitting work-related assignments, and will recieve supervisor feedback. Students will conduct a written and oral final report.


E) Results of Program Assessment

Program

PSLO #

PSLO Title

# of Assessments

% Met Benchmark

Hospitality and Tourism

1

Communication

770

79

Hospitality and Tourism

2a

Critical Thinking

322

82

Hospitality and Tourism

2b

Synthesize and Evaluate Information

198

84

Hospitality and Tourism

3a

Presentation Skills

90

91

Hospitality and Tourism

3b

Research Skills

132

98

Hospitality and Tourism

4

Teamwork

50

82

F) Other Comments

Student perform at satisfactory or above satisfactory levels as indiciated on the results of the Program Assessment table.

G) Next Steps

The HOST Program Coordinator will continue to work towards meeting the proposed action plan goals and assess courses to ensure student success in the program.