University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Hawaii Community College
Program: Digital Media Arts

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2009, and can be viewed at:
http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/program-unit-review/docs/2009_dma_annual_program_review.pdf

Program Description

The Digital Media Arts(DMA) program at Hawai‘i Community College at present offers a 21-credit hour Certificate of Completion (C.C.) intended to prepare students for a variety of entry-level work: in Graphic Design, Webpage Design (also known as Interface Design), Digital Video, Digital Photography, 2-D Animation and 3-D Computer Graphics. The curriculum includes the study of traditional studio arts (i.e. drawing, design, photography) and with the new digital media arts technologies to meet the multimedia technology training needs of the state.

The DMA certificate prepares students for work in the fields of digital media design and production. It gives necessary education and training to students seeking entry-level positions as digital media artists. It provides professionals ready in the field with updated technology training.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Unhealthy

Majors Included: DMA     Program CIP: 10.0304

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 51 10 20 Unhealthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 6 1 2
3 *Number of Majors 63.5 63 53
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 29 28 22
3b     Fall Full-Time 42% 22% 25%
3c     Fall Part-Time 58% 78% 75%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 0% 0%
3e     Spring Full-Time 27% 31% 22%
3f     Spring Part-Time 73% 69% 78%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 2% 2% 0%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 489 489 441
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 480 621 549
6 SSH in All Program Classes 969 1,110 990
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 32 37 33
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 24 25 23

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 13.5 14.8 14.3 Cautionary
10 *Fill Rate 83.8% 77.7% 73.3%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 0 0
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 0 0
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 24.5 24.0 21.4
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 2.6 2.6 2.5
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $257,538 $237,229 $295,659
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $33,425 $48,771 $23,310
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $224,113 $178,888 $245,303
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $9,570 $27,046
15 Cost per SSH $266 $214 $299
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 3 5 5
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 80% 82% 76% Unhealthy
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 19 17 25
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 68.2% 66.1% 53.3%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     25%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 24 12 10
20a Degrees Awarded 0 0 0
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 24 12 10
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 1 2 3
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 1 2 3

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 1  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes N/A N/A 25
25 Fill Rate N/A N/A 83%
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) N/A N/A 48%
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) N/A N/A 2
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) N/A N/A No Fall Courses

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 100.00 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 0.00 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 50.00 Not Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 66.67 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 53.49 Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 0 Not Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     0  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     0
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
38 Number of Pell Recipients     20
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     3
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Overall Health -- Unhealthy

Demand -- Unhealthy

DMA has an "Unhealthy" demand indicator(same as last academic year) score due to the high number of majors (53 - Demand Indicator #3) being significantly greater than the number of new and replacement positions available that are county prorated(2 positions - Demand Indicator #2.)

The dataset that was used to determine the demand indicator (unhealthy) of the DMA program indicates an excess of supply over demand. According to the data provided, the average annual new and replacement positions are 20 (Demand Indicator #1) at the state level and only 2 postitions (Demand Indicator #2) at the county level. This may not be an accurate reflection of the state of the local job market for our graduates. Furthermore, once prorated, the number is reduced to the point that the number of prorated available new positions in our county is so low (2 positions) that DMA will most likely always be classified as "Unhealthy" using only this data source. Often times DMA graduates work as self-employed freelancers, which is a common practice in DMA-related fields, but are not accounted for within the provided data. In fact, the number one industry for DMA fields, according to the CIP website,  is "self-employment." DMA is assigned the CIP code #10.034. It is unclear why other CIP codes that DMA prepares students for as well is not included also, such as CIP code #10.0399 Graphic Communication.

Student interest in the Digital Media Arts program has dropped from 63(AY11-12) majors to 53.  During AY 10-11 there were 64 majors, and in AY10-09 there were 62 majors. It is concerning that the number of majors has drop, since for the first time DMA has had a fulltime Educational Specialist for the whole year, assiting with counseling and advising on every step of each student's academic journey. One reason could be that the new finacial aid rules has forced, other wise DMA declared majors, to be declaring as Liberal Arts majors to get the financil aid for their classes.

When evaluating the data, it is important to note the sequence of DMA classes a student is advised to take and the limited rotations of classes in the program each semester. Here is the sequence of classes we advise students to take:

First semester: Art 112, Art 115, (and Ent 120, and/or optional class)

Second semester: Art 202, Art 209, (and Art 293 to finish C.C. in one year)

Or Third semester: Art 293 and Ent 120(requires students to finish in 3 semster)

Note the cohort that matriculates to the second semester is limited to the Art202 and Art209 class capped at 20 students per class/semester, 20 X 2 semesters for a total of 40 majors per year, and that is the benchmark by which this figure should be measured. The 20-student-max per cohort number is determined by space limitations, specifically the number of computers capable of fitting into the DMA lab.

Efficiency -- Cautionary

The Average Class size (Efficiency Indicator #9) at 14.3 remains similar to last year's 14.8.The Class Fill Rate (Efficiency Indicator #10) is at 73.3%, down from the previous year of 77.7%. According to the scoring rubric, this is considered cautionary down from last year's "Healthy." When averaged with the Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty ratio (Efficiency Indicator #12) value of 0 the overall program efficiency score is decreased from "Cautionary" to "Unhealthy" 53:0. In fact there are two BOR FTE that are shared between ART and DMA so the ratio is 53:2, which would be a "Healthy" call.

Effectiveness -- Unhealthy

Number of Unduplicated Degrees awarded(10) to number if Majors(53) is 20% which is a "Healthy" call.  But, number of unduplicated degrees awarded(10) divided by New & Replacement of Positions County prorate(the problem with this scoring is explain above) is 2, which results with the program having an "Unhealthy" call.

DMA student successful completion and persistence has been steadily decreasing:

Completion: AY11-12: 82% to AY12-13: 76%

Persistence: AY11-12: 66% to AY12-13: 53%

Certificates awarded rate remain the same a last year at 19% of majors graduated.

In general the DMA program will shift its focus from recruitment activities to retention activities.  Retention will improve through student support services such as: intensive counseling, career planning, internship placement and tutoring to DMA majors.  In addition, the program will develop extra curricula activities such as workshops on Native Hawaiian activities, and opportunities for involvement in community service projects.

 

Significant Program Actions for 2012 - 2013

1.  A grant funded full time Educational Specialist was hired to help advise and council students with their academic journey.

2.  The program Fiscal Specialist position was vacant for the whole year. The program coordinator had to fill in those duties this program year.

 

Previous Program Actions

Recruitment via high schools visitations, open house, hosting of visiting student to the DMA lab will be continuing. The program promotion via the website and social media are kept current and active.

Grant Development:  DMA will continue to work with Alu Like Inc. of Honolulu to pursue grant opportunities to support Native Hawaiians, and others all others, in career and technical education, and to support ongoing student support initiatives.

Continue student learning outcome assessment.  Working with instructors to reflect on assessment results and using these results to make adjustments in the curriculum.

Professional Development:  The DMA program, with funding from the Native Hawaiian Career and Technical Education Program (NHCTEP) grant, will continue to invest in its instructional staff in order to maximize the learning experience of the students both in the classroom and in the program as a whole.

The DMA program will continue its efforts to develop a 2+2 program in Digital Media Arts with UH Hilo art department.

 

Perkins IV Core Indicators

DMA did not meet Perkins IV Core Indicator for 2P1-Completion and 3P1- Student Retention or Transfer.

Part III. Action Plan

Program Action 1

The DMA program will continue its efforts to develop a 2+2 program in Digital Media Arts with UH Hilo art department.

We are currently in collaboration with UH Hilo Art Department faculty on drafting a 2+2 program in Digital Media Arts. Students will do two years of course work at HawCC then transfer or graduate to UH Hilo to do two more years of upper division course work in digital media, and then graduate with a BA with a digital media emphasis.

Program Action 2

To improve persistence and completion rates.  This aligns to Goal A:  Educational Effectiveness and Student Success.  

1.  Help students with internship placement one semester prior to the student registering for the internship class.

2.  The program will guide the student in the graduation process.

3.   The program will contact each eligible student to apply for graduation.

4.   Advising students target graduation in one year of entering the program.

Program Action 3

Aligns to Goal B: Functions as a Seamless State System.  Modify the AS degree that was approved in curriculum central to align to UHH.  Get AS proposal BOR approved.

1.   Help students with internship placement one semester prior to the student registering for the internship class.

2.   The program will guide the student in the graduation process.

3.   The program will contact each eligible student to apply for graduation.

4.   Advising students target graduation in one year of entering the program.

5.  Catch struggling students early to seek tutoring.

 

Part IV. Resource Implications

Cost Item 1

Upgrading of new digital media software                   Equipment                 $ No cost indicated

DMA maintains one computer lab with 20 workstations. The workstations are installed hi-end industry standard graphics software packages, and a broad range of technology peripherals. Upgrades to softwares are necessary to keep our student current with the digital media industry when they enter the work force.  This cost item aligns with the technological strategic plan 1.4 - Update equipment as needed to stay abreast with technological and user demands.

Cost Item 2

Replacement of digital camera, video equipment, and printers                  Equipment                        $ No cost indicated

Replacement of broken or out dated digital hardware is necessary to keep our student current with the digital media industry when they enter the work force.  This cost item aligns with the technological strategic plan 1.4 - Update equipment as needed to stay abreast with technological and user demands.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No
1. Use technology effectively to create visual artworks.

2

No
2. Gather, analyze and evaluate information visually and critically.

3

Yes
3. Contribute and apply knowledge of aesthetics to the needs of the community.

4

No
4. Demonstrate professionalism with a digital portfolio.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

Students take Art293 Internship class(a culminating class before graduation) as part of the CC curriculum. Since this class sends students with digital media skills to do actual industry work, it gives the DMA program feedback/validation on the student’s outcome from the program.

Another aspect of industry validation for the DMA program is that advisory committee has actively participated in helping the program draft rubrics to assess our DMA SLO’s.

B) Expected Level Achievement

70% of the artifacts assessed by the Assessment Team will meet or exceed expectations.

C) Courses Assessed

Art 293

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

SLO #3: Contribute and apply knowledge of aesthetics to the needs of the community.

Step 1. Identify the artifact(s) (i.e., student work) for assessment and course(s) from which selected:

Name/Description of artifact:  Art 293 Internship digital portfolio

Step 2.             Develop the assessment tool (e.g., rubric) to be used with 3 levels of assessment, if applicable—Level 1=does not meet expectations; Level 2=meets expectations; Level 3=exceeds expectations.  Attach the assessment tool.

EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS – LEVEL 3     Score 3 points

MEETS EXPECTATIONS – LEVEL 2          Score 2 points

DOES NOT MEET EXPECTATIONS - 1      Score 1 point

1) Effectively contributed and communicated aesthetic knowledge and expertise as an intern.

1) Contributed and communicated aesthetic knowledge and expertise as an intern.                       

1) Did not contributed and communicated aesthetic knowledge and expertise as an intern.

           

2) Effectively demonstrated self-management and interpersonal skills with people from a variety of backgrounds.

2) Demonstrated effective self-management and interpersonal skills with people from a variety of backgrounds.

2) Limited self-management and interpersonal skills with people from a variety of backgrounds. 

 

3) Effectively demonstrated self-awareness and self-assessment as an intern.

3) Demonstrated self-awareness and self-assessment in the internship.                  

3) Demonstrated limited self-awareness and self-assessment in the internship.

 

4) Analyzed information collected and presented them coherently in the project.

4) Analyzed information collected and presented them in the project.

4) Little or no analysis of information collected and presented in the project.

           

5) Worked effectively as a member of a project team and meet deadlines.

5) Worked as a member of a project team and met deadlines.

5) Did not worked effectively as a member of a project team and meet deadlines

Step 3.   Set the Performance Rate

80% of the artifacts assessed by the Assessment Team will meet or exceed expectations

Step 4.             Describe the method used to collect the artifacts:

Where or from whom artifacts will be collected:

Eportfolios are presented and collected at the end of the semester.

When will artifacts be collected:  Collected by May 11, 2013.  Assessment Team evaluation completed by May 11, 2013.

Step 5.             Describe the sampling method used to collect the data:

100% of the eportfolio were evaluated by the Assessment Team

Step 6. Describe the composition of the Assessment Team (AT) (add more rows as needed):

Evaluator(s):

1 One faculty member

2 One graduate currently working in DMA or one employer of graduates

3 One Advisory Board member

E) Results of Program Assessment

Of the 21 forms given to the three members to evaluate the e-portfolios, 80% of the evaluations were rated exceeded or meet expectations.

F) Other Comments

The assessments were done live, which means students gave the presentation of their e-portfolio to the assessment committee during their final presentation for the class.

G) Next Steps

Benchmarks for this PLO has been met. The rubric to assess this PLO was reviewed by the DMA advisory council in our April 2013 meeting.