University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Honolulu Community College
Program: Construction Management

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Program did not provide date of the last comprehensive review.

Program Description

Program Mission:  The Construction Management program’s mission is to provide training for students who are interested in developing entry level skills or in-service professional development required for employment in the construction management field. Provide students with general education skills, attitudes, and values for effectively working with others, contributing to the Construction Management industry.

 

Program Description:  The Construction Management program is designed to prepare students for immediate employment as quantity surveyors, estimators, coordinators, project engineers, and supervisors.

The program intends to provide well rounded individuals with skills in AutoCAD, Building Information Modeling software, Primavera, and other industry standard software.

The program leads to an Associate in Science degree. 

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: CMGT     Program CIP: 46.0412

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State)     135 Healthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated)     9
3 *Number of Majors     27.5
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian     6
3b     Fall Full-Time     52%
3c     Fall Part-Time     48%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System     0%
3e     Spring Full-Time     50%
3f     Spring Part-Time     50%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System     0%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes     322
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes     21
6 SSH in All Program Classes     343
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes     11
8 Total Number of Classes Taught     16

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size     6.8 Cautionary
10 *Fill Rate     27.9%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty     1
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty     27.5
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty     16.1
13a Analytic FTE Faculty     1.7
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation     $131,279
14a General Funded Budget Allocation     $124,559
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation     $0
14c Tuition and Fees     $6,720
15 Cost per SSH     $383
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes     12
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher)     75% Unhealthy
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W)     2
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring     59.2%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     29.6%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded     0
20a Degrees Awarded     0
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded     0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded     0
20d Other Certificates Awarded     0
21 External Licensing Exams Passed     Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
22a Transfers with credential from program     0
22b Transfers without credential from program     0

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught     2  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes     31
25 Fill Rate     62%
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher)     61%
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W)     1
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education)     44%

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment        
30 2P1 Completion      
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer      
32 4P1 Student Placement      
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation      
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion      

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     0  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     0
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
38 Number of Pell Recipients     8
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

A “Healthy” demand for the program is due to a positive forecast of industry needs at the national and more importantly state level; as the local economy improves, construction will follow.  Although this will help the Construction Management program in respect to its future Demand Indicators health, at the same time it will adversely impact the program’s future effectiveness status because of our inability to meet such a great demand without an immediate growth in enrollment and achievement of degrees.  This type of growth will not be immediately attained in the program’s early stage of existence.

Shown below is O*NET’s forecasts of future employment and average wages for Construction Managers and applicable related fields: 

SOC Code 11-9021.00 - Construction Managers

Location

Pay
Period

2012

10%

25%

Median

75%

90%

United States

Hourly

$23.89

$30.67

$39.80

$52.69

$69.48

Yearly

$49,700

$63,800

$82,800

$109,600

$144,500

HHawaii

Hourly

$27.37

$34.43

$44.57

$59.02

$69.02

Yearly

$56,900

$71,600

$92,700

$122,800

$143,600

United States

Employment

Percent 
Change

Job Openings 1

2010

2020

Construction Managers

523,100

609,600

+17%

12,040

Hawaii

Employment

Percent 
Change

Job Openings 1

2010

2020

Construction Managers

2,510

2,930

+17%

60

1Job Openings refers to the average annual job openings due to growth and net replacement.

 

SOC Code 47-4011.00 - Construction and Building Inspectors

Location

Pay
Period

2012

10%

25%

Median

75%

90%

United States

Hourly

$15.41

$19.74

$25.70

$32.78

$40.27

Yearly

$32,100

$41,100

$53,500

$68,200

$83,800

Hawaii

Hourly

$17.79

$21.66

$26.49

$32.19

$37.45

Yearly

$37,000

$45,100

$55,100

$67,000

$77,900

United States

Employment

Percent 
Change

Job Openings 1

2010

2020

Construction and Building Inspectors

102,400

120,800

+18%

4,860

Hawaii

Employment

Percent 
Change

Job Openings 1

2010

2020

Construction and Building Inspectors

740

850

+15%

30

1Job Openings refers to the average annual job openings due to growth and net replacement.

 

SOC Code 47-1011.00 - First-Line Supervisors of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers

Location

Pay
Period

2012

10%

25%

Median

75%

90%

United States

Hourly

$17.73

$22.36

$28.70

$36.55

$45.36

Yearly

$36,900

$46,500

$59,700

$76,000

$94,300

HHawaii

Hourly

$23.33

$28.81

$36.83

$43.71

$53.11

Yearly

$48,500

$59,900

$76,600

$90,900

$110,500

United States

Employment

Percent 
Change

Job Openings 1

2010

2020

First-Line Supervisors of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers

558,500

689,500

+24%

25,970

Hawaii

Employment

Percent 
Change

Job Openings 1

2010

2020

First-Line Supervisors of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers

2,690

3,230

+20%

120

               

1Job Openings refers to the average annual job openings due to growth and net replacement.

 

SOC Code 13-1051.00 – Cost Estimators

Location

Pay
Period

2012

10%

25%

Median

75%

90%

United States

Hourly

$16.60

$21.46

$28.30

$37.08

$46.48

Yearly

$34,500

$44,600

$58,900

$77,100

$96,700

Hawaii

Hourly

$19.88

$26.18

$33.39

$42.41

$49.07

Yearly

$41,400

$54,500

$69,500

$88,200

$102,100

United States

Employment

Percent 
Change

Job Openings 1

2010

2020

Cost Estimators

185,400

252,900

+36%

10,300

Hawaii

Employment

Percent 
Change

Job Openings 1

2010

2020

Cost Estimators

980

1,300

+33%

50

                     

1Job Openings refers to the average annual job openings due to growth and net replacement.

Until the CMGT program undergoes a full rotation of 4 semesters, a complete and accurate analysis of program efficiency and effectiveness cannot be made. However several observations and predictions within these areas can still be made.

The efficiency of the CMGT program is currently in “Cautionary” status largely due to an extremely small Average Class Size number and a low Fill Rate percentage.  These numbers include the small number of existing students who participated during the experimental stages.  These students, who were technically in their 3rd and 4th semester during our first academic year of course offerings, ultimately brought down the overall class size average. 

The Effectiveness Indicators currently show the program’s status as “Unhealthy”. The completion of the first provisional year (2 semesters) of the Construction Management (CMGT) program realized several outcomes and changes. The remaining seven students who participated in our experimental courses, continued towards successfully completing the program and obtaining a degree. Unfortunately none of these students were able to achieve their degree in the planned 2 year timeline.  Being that these students were among the original participants during the developmental period, many factors added to the difficulty of achieving this goal and is no way looked at as a lack of program effectiveness.  Instead, these students are looked at as the trailblazers of our program who have endured the growing pains of curriculum adjustments and course schedule changes during developmental stages through to approved provisional status and ultimately remain on course to achieve success.  Of the seven, four students are currently taking the few remaining courses required and are on track to earn their degree in the Spring of 2014.  The other three did not complete program courses and will likely not return. Two are currently employed in the field and one outside our field of study. These students are still counted as successes as all three took the skills learned during their participation in the program and utilized them in acquiring employment. All of the aforesaid setbacks were widely due to the inability to avoid scheduling conflicts between course offerings and employment opportunities.

Alternately, we saw the addition of 35 students declaring Construction Management as their major with 21 students meeting existing program prerequisites and successfully enrolling in CMGT courses. The other 7 are working on meeting the program prerequisites. After contacting the students who expressed interest in the program and did not enroll, the cause was either the inability to attend courses during the scheduled course times because of existing employment needs to meet personal financial responsibilities or just the inability to afford education without acquiring or the qualification of financial aid.  A report from our Financial Aid office found that in the 2012-2013 Academic Year, there were 28 Construction Management students who applied for financial aid using the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) and only 15 of them received aid.

As we continue into our second academic year of provisional status, we will concentrate on the expansion of marketing the program with extensive recruitment strategies along with course scheduling changes to accommodate potential students who are currently employed.  This will be done with the expectation of seeing a steady increase in enrollment, which will ultimately aid in achieving an improvement of program efficiency and effectiveness.

Part III. Action Plan

Results of last year’s action plan…

1.Upgrade existing out dated surveying hardware, software, and curricula to maintain the program's success and leadership in preparing students for entry-level employment in the CMGT industry. Through a Perkins grant we were able to purchase the most current model of Total Stations being used in industry. The grant amount was $44,000.00.

2.Develop the new one-year Certificate of Achievement. The Certificate of Achievement proposal is currently going through curriculum approvals.

3.Develop the new third-year Professional Degree in support of the proposed Bachelors of Applied Science Degree in Construction Management being proposed by West Oahu College. The proposal had changed to a 2+2 model and is currently on hold pending final BOR approval of the CMGT program at Honolulu Community College.

4.Continue to work with our Advisory Committee to increase its engagement with the program and students.  This was the motivation for the Advisory Committee members to meet for the first time this year with students at the beginning of the academic year. Other efforts of a similar type will be made as well. Due to the unexpected emergency leave by one of the program faculty, we were unable to fully accomplish this action item.

5.Work with the Advisory Committee to increase the membership. This past year saw the addition of a representative from the local chapter of the Construction Managers Association of America, Mike Young of Bowers & Kubota, Song Choi Associate Dean College of Engineering, and a representative from the General Contractors Association joining our advisory committee.

6.Continue to work with local organizations on building and design projects as opportunities arise.  The program is currently working with the State Department of Hawaiian Homelands on a project in the Honolulu Punchbowl area. As the Hawaiian Homelands project has stalled, we are working with Senator Chun-Oakland on a Homeless Shelter Initiative and currently have a MOA in hand and will begin the project in the Spring of 2014. This project will utilize various programs on campus to assist in the development and construction of a prototype shelter.

7.Continue Grant writing to support program growth and technology. Last year in a joint project with the AEC program faculty we received a Perkins grant for the purchase and curriculum development for 3D printers for $32,423.00. We also received a Perkins grant for the surveying equipment in the amount of $ 44,000.00. Our faculty also brought in an additional $31, 500.00 for a summer engineering program. This totals $107,923.00 in grant funding received by our program.

8.Begin to offer non-credit training to industry professionals and others that promote greater program visibility and further develop relationships with our industry and community partners. With the unexpected absence of one faculty member we had to shelve any non-credit activities until his return.

9.Continue our partnerships with General Contractors Association, Building Industry of Hawaii, Construction Managers Association of America Hawaii Chapter, and Construction Specifications Institute Hawaii Chapter. Currently CMGT faculty sit on the boards of the CMAA and meets regularly with the education committee at the GCA, we also maintain communication with the Building Industry of Hawaii staff and meet with them as needed, we maintain student chapters with CMAA and the NAHB (BIA). This past year the Student Chapter attended a National Construction Management Competition at the International Builders Show and won “Rookie of the Year” honors. The Student chapter also won “People’s Choice” at the Annual BIA Stew Challenge.

Our work with the local CMAA chapter has brought 2 scholarships for our students in the amount of $1,000 each. Our students have also been included locally in scholarship opportunities given by Design Build Association of Hawaii, National Organization of Women in Construction, and National Association of Home Builders.

10.Continue to advocate for a dedicated lab and/or classroom for CMGT students. Current classroom usage does not allow the CMGT program to fully utilize classroom space and create mockups of assemblies. CMGT faculty offices are filled with equipment and classroom items that could be stored in more permanent locations in the classroom. (We have also made an agreement with the ICS faculty to utilize their computer labs at night and help in maintaining them. Which will save costs in the long run)

11.Expand the use of 3D printing for construction modeling. Last year in a joint project with the AEC program faculty we received a Perkins grant for the purchase and curriculum development for 3D printers for $32,423.00. Current curriculum actions will be addressing the inclusion of the 3D printers and research continues in the area. We have given presentations to DOE and UHCC faculty, Construction Managers Association of America Mini Conference, Society of Military Engineers, and The Mercury Business Club.

12.Acquire a mobile lab for CMGT students. (This item has been shelved at the current time with the agreement with ICS.)

New Action Items for the 2013 to 2014 Academic Year…

1.Increase enrollment.

2.Develop and use a student satisfaction survey that is designed to collect exit data from graduating students.

3.Expand and develop student employment tracking information system.

4.Expand and develop surveying program. By introducing an advanced surveying course elective and by acquiring 3D scanning technology.

5.Have the program listed as a STEM career.

6.Continue the development of curriculum for the 3D printers.

7.Begin to offer non-credit training to industry professionals and others to promote greater program visibility and further develop relationships with industry and community partners.

8.Continue improvement of program and course assessment instruments and methods.  Close the loop in the area of program and course assessment.

Part IV. Resource Implications

1.Action Item # 3 – Initial non-credit offerings of courses will help to expand the surveying module. The acquisition of the 3D scanner will open new opportunities for non-credit training and hands-on learning activities for students.(Grant Funding will have to be obtained to finance this project)

 

No other items in the action plan will require special budgeting or resources.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Demonstrate key skills necessary for effective management, planning, scheduling, and control of the overall construction project with attention to related sustainable construction practices.

2

Yes
Explain the materials and methods used in the construction of commercial and residential construction projects, covering procedures, equipment, sustainability, and techniques.

3

Yes
Demonstrate proficiency in the interpretation of construction drawings and specifications, construction safety principles and practices, sustainable construction practices, and related federal, state, and county codes.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

Program Student Learning Outcomes (PLO’s) were presented to and approved by the CMGT Advisory Board members. Both PLO’s and individual course Student Learning Outcomes (SLO’s) are in alignment with the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE) Topical Content.  Additionally, all students selected for internship opportunities are given an evaluation which is conducted by the participating employer. A positive validation of the programs effectiveness in preparing students for employment has been seen in recent evaluation reports and comments

 

These are some comments from employers with whom students have been placed:

 

“I have worked with several different interns from the UH system, ????? is the first from your Construction Management program I have had a chance to work with. She entered

the job head and shoulders above the other interns as far as ability to perform on a construction site.  The foundation of knowledge and understanding she came on board with helped her jump right into doing real work and has helped our team out a ton. She has been successful with the document management, searching and finding material or labor we need quickly, material takeoffs, detailing, LEED management, and advanced submittal review. Each of these things usually takes me weeks to train new a project engineer to get right, ????? was already familiar with each of these tasks and now performs them with little oversight if any. Of course her natural aptitude and great attitude are a big factor in her success to date, but her work in the CM program has set her well ahead and given her great momentum to advance.”

 

“????? has been a great asset this past year.  No matter what I asked him to do, he dug into it, found out what he needed, and added value to my organization for the effort he expended.  From very simple office jobs to assisting our Site Safety and Health Officer (SSHO) on a $26M construction project to construct a new fitness center at Camp Smith, he was an asset.  Our SSHO stated that ????? was knowledgeable of construction safety requirements and greatly aided him on-site. We provided training he needed and then he took over.”

 

“His knowledge of reading drawings and specs has aided in the early preparation of our future proposal to construct arched concrete hangars in Guam.  He researched forming methodologies and provided information to our construction managers on potential cost effects methods of forming cast-in-place arched concrete.”

B) Expected Level Achievement

  1. The program faculty currently assesses and collects evidence of student achievement of program learning outcomes using a variety of methods including hands-on lab assignments, written projects, oral reports, group projects, written exams and quizzes, and various culminating projects. Students are expected to demonstrate satisfactory achievement of course SLO’s, which is required to receive a passing grade in all program related courses.

C) Courses Assessed

  1. Continued discussions with our advisory board to ensure that course SLO’s are current and relevant to industry expectations and expected student achievements in meeting the course learning outcomes, especially in regards to course SLO’s,. We have reviewed the majority of our courses in our curriculum, including courses SLO’s and through careful monitoring and assessment we can update the SLO’s when expectations for the course have changed or are not meeting the needs of industry.
  2. We are currently looking at our assessment methods and will be refining them to target specific SLO’s and PLO’s. Current assessment methods include examinations and quizzes, written reports, discussion boards, hands-on assignments, and culminating projects.

 

The following courses were assessed during the 2012-2013 Academic Year:

Fall 2012

Spring 2013

CMGT 100

CMGT 122

CMGT 112

CMGT 123

CMGT 210

CMGT 145

CMGT 214

CMGT 220

CMGT 216

CMGT 224

CE 211*

CMGT 226

IS 106**

CMGT 228

                                                               *Instructed by CMGT faculty for CMGT majors

                                                               **Instructed by CMGT faculty for CMGT majors and other programs   

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

  1. Over the summer we completed the CMGT program map and have posted it at http://honcccm.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/program-map.pdf
  2. Our current strategy includes pre and post knowledge surveys as well as embedded assessments targeting various SLO’s and PLO’s. Current assessment methods include examinations and quizzes, written reports, discussion boards, hands-on assignments, and culminating projects.
  3. On an informal basis we observe the students to ensure that they demonstrate increased proficiency and knowledge of information as they progress through the program.

E) Results of Program Assessment

  1. One of the results of the program assessment made us look at the CAD portion of the program and make changes in curriculum and course content. As it is not our programs mission to create competent CAD technicians, our program is geared to provide the student with a working knowledge of CAD software and utilize the software to enhance student learning of interpretation of construction drawings. It is our feeling that by understanding how drawings are put together the student will be better able to interpret those drawings in the field of construction management. We have made changes to the content and SLO’s of our introductory CAD course and will continue to monitor and make adjustments to subsequent CAD courses in the near future based on assessment data. This was presented and discussed with our advisory group and approved.
  2. We have also created a new course based on assessment data from AEC 118 that indicated to us that AEC 118 has a strong emphasis on materials and not the materials and its use in construction. We have created a new course CMGT 114 to address this and this course will be offered in the 2014-2015 Academic Year as an online course. This has been presented and discussed with our advisory group and approved.

F) Other Comments

  1. None at this time

G) Next Steps

  1. See Part III, Action Plan.