University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Honolulu Community College
Program: Computing, Electronics & Networking Tech

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The last comprehensive review for this program can be viewed at:
http://programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/sites/programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu.intranet/files/CENT_0708.pdf
STEM Program

Program Description

Program Mission Statement

The mission of the Computing, Electronics, and Networking Technology program at Honolulu Community College is to serve the community as a learning-centered, open door program which provides technical training to meet the demands of the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) industry and the needs of the individual. The program is designed to provide the student with a mixture of knowledge and hands-on training with an emphasis on preparing students for entry level employment in the Information and Communications Technology industry.

Program Description

The CENT program offers an Associate in Science (AS) Degree and an Advanced Professional Certificate (APC) in Computing, Electronics, and Networking Technology.

The Associate in Science (AS) Degree in the Computing, Electronics, and Networking Technology program is a two-year course of study that prepares the student for entry-level employment in the field of Information and Communications Technology (ICT). Core classes are designed to give students a firm foundation in the basics of computers, networking and information systems. Elective courses allow students to further specialize in a field of study in Information and Communications Technology. Students are required to participate in an internship or cooperative education experience before completing the program. Our courses also prepare the student to take the following Information and Communications Technology industry certification exams: Computer Technician A+, Linux+, Cisco Certified Network Associate, Microsoft Certified Professional, Security+, and VMWare Certified Professional. The CENT program, in partnership with the Pacific Center for Advanced Technology Training (PCATT) at Honolulu Community College, is a Cisco Authorized Regional Academy, a CompTIA Training Center, a Microsoft Regional Academy, and a VMWare Academy.

The Advanced Professional Certificate (APC) in CENT is designed to provide the student with advanced technical training in the field of Information and Communications Technology with a core emphasis on Information Assurance (IA). This program also features training in the soft technical skills required to become an ICT professional. The student will have the opportunity to pursue advanced industry certifications.

The Honolulu Community College CENT program has established an articulation agreement with the University of Hawai'i at West O'ahu leading to a Bachelor of Applied Science Degree in CENT or a newly established Bachelor of Applied Science Degree in Information Security and Assurance (ISA). There is also an articulation agreement leading to a Bachelor of Arts in System Administration with Hawai'i Pacific University. Students who complete the Associate of Science degree may apply to transfer to these institutions to complete a baccalaureate degree in any of these programs. Students may be concurrently enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science program at UH West O'ahu and the CENT AS or APC program at HCC.

INFORMATION ASSURANCE COURSEWARE CERTIFICATION
The Committee on National Security Systems and the National Security Agency have certified that both the University of Hawai`i - West O`ahu and Honolulu Community College offer a set of courseware that has been reviewed by national level Information Assurance Subject Matter Experts and determined to meet National Training Standards for Information Systems Security Professionals NSTISSI 4011, and CNSS 4012 for academic years 2013-2018.  Honolulu Community College has also been designated as a Center of Academic Excellence - 2 Year for training in Information Assurance.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Healthy

Majors Included: CENT     Program CIP: 11.0901

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 30 140 221 Healthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 24 79 110
3 *Number of Majors 188 198 176
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 18 24 23
3b     Fall Full-Time 46% 44% 46%
3c     Fall Part-Time 54% 56% 54%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 4% 3% 2%
3e     Spring Full-Time 47% 46% 46%
3f     Spring Part-Time 53% 54% 54%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 3% 2% 6%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 1,930 1,952 1,929
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 2,369 2,416 2,189
6 SSH in All Program Classes 4,299 4,368 4,118
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 143 146 137
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 64 62 64

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 19.8 20.5 18.6 Healthy
10 *Fill Rate 89.1% 89.4% 79%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 3 3 3
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 62.6 66 58.6
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 23.5 25.1 21.9
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 8 7.9 8.0
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $284,429 $267,956 $299,020
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $284,429 $254,928 $284,110
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $13,028 $14,910
15 Cost per SSH $66 $61 $73
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 4 2 7
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 77% 78% 78% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 53 57 69
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 68.6% 77.1% 71.5%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     54.1%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 16 21 30
20a Degrees Awarded 15 20 30
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 3 1 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 3 1 0
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 10 21 13
22a Transfers with credential from program 2 9 1
22b Transfers without credential from program 8 12 12

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 3 0 0  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes 58 N/A N/A
25 Fill Rate 92% N/A N/A
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 74% N/A N/A
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 5 N/A N/A
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) 44% N/A N/A

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 92.86 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 28.57 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 80.37 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 64.15 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 9.66 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 12.50 Not Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     30  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     3
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     30
38 Number of Pell Recipients     73
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     13
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

CENT SOC codes and CIP codes:
Network and Computer Administrators:
SOC: 15-1071 (old) 15-1142 (new); CIP: 11.0901/11.1001
Computer Support Specialists:  SOC: 15-1041 (old), 15-1150 (new); CIP: 11.1006
Telecommunications Equipment Installers and Repairers:  SOC: 49-2022; CIP: 47.0103 Communications Systems Installation and Repair Technology

The CENT program overall Health metric was satisfactory (Healthy).

The Demand Indicators metric reflects the CENT program as Healthy, based on 176 majors and 110 New and Replacement Positions prorated at the county level.

The Efficiency Indicators metric reflects the CENT program as Healthy.  The program overall class fill rate was 79% (Healthy), the ratio of Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty dropped to 58.6 (Cautionary) as compared to the previous year, with the calculated “Analytic FTE Faculty” at 8.0. The CENT program officially has 3 FTE BOR appointed faculty members, one of whom is currently on leave of absence and not teaching, which means the effective ratio of Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty is really 88.  We get additional part-time teaching support from Bill Becker who works in HCC ITS, Vern Takebayashi and Michael Cress who are ICS faculty, and three lecturers.

The Effectiveness Indicators metric reflects the CENT program as Cautionary.  The program showed growth in Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded metric from 21 to 30, although the ratio of Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates awarded compared to Number of Majors was 17.0% (Cautionary), which was a significant increase compared to 10.6% the previous year.  The ratio of the number of Degrees and Certificates awarded compared to New and Replacement Positions (County) was .273 (Cautionary) compared to .266 for this metric the previous year.  The Persistence from fall to spring was 71.5% (Cautionary), down from 77% (Healthy) the previous year.  Beyond these measures the CENT course completion rate remained solid at 78%.  There was a drop in the number of Transfers to UH 4-yr from 21 last year to 13 this year, with 12 of those transfers occurring before students completed the CENT AS degree. The transfer rate reflects the CENT program’s articulation agreement with the University of HawaiÊ»i at West OÊ»ahu for the Bachelors of Applied Science Degree in CENT. The articulation agreement with UHWO also allows for dual enrollment, so students frequently take courses at both campuses before completing their degree requirements.

The Perkins IV Core indicators show that as a campus overall Honolulu Community College did not meet the Perkins IV Core Indicator 2P1 Completion. The overall campus completion rate was 28.57% compared to a system-wide goal of 45%.  Perkins goals are set as system level goals for two year programs, not as goals for individual programs.  The established goal of 45% does not take into account unique program characteristics, such as the fact that the majority of students in the CENT program are participating in one of our four year degree options, as well as those students who are seeking the two year AS degree.  Consequently, the fact that many students in the CENT Program are participating in an overall 4 year degree program, which allows concurrent enrollment at two campuses, may adversely affect the overall campus completion rate for this Perkins core indicator metric. The campus also did not met the Perkins IV Core Indicator 5P1 Nontraditional Participation with a score of 9.66 compared to a system-wide goal of 17.99.  CENT will work with the CTE Dean to regarding ways to increase nontraditional participation in our program.

Part III. Action Plan

The following action plan items can be tied to the HCC Specific Additional Outcomes and Measures accessible online at http://programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/sites/programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu.intranet/files/2009-strategic-outcomes-statements.pdf

  1. Hire additional faculty.  (Outcome #2).  The CENT Program previously had five full-time faculty positions, of which two positions were vacated in June 2008. We were able to operate with reduced faculty because we had low enrollments at that time, and we had not yet implemented our articulation with UHWO for the BAS degree. For four years we had three full-time faculty members, supplemented by lecturers and faculty from ICS teaching courses on our behalf. Our enrollments steadily increased as a result of our articulation with UHWO.  One of our 3 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty has been on leave of absence since January, which means the remaining 2 full-time faculty must manage an even heavier load for teaching, curriculum development and maintenance, equipment maintenance and program management, in addition to the responsibility for updating our skills based on continuous technology changes.  We have reached the point that our need for additional full-time staffing to maintain existing courses and assist in developing new courses for the CENT programs has become critical.

We have requested authority to hire additional full-time faculty since spring 2012, but have received no indication of possible action with regard to these requests.  We need to have support from Administration for action on this request, so we can hire additional full-time faculty to support the needs of the program for instruction and continued program development.

The ramifications of not having additional full-time faculty are increasing reliance on lecturers and the inability of current CENT faculty to develop needed new courses, adequately maintain our current courses up-to-date, and to continue to meet ongoing program management and program review requirements. This adversely affects our ability to satisfactorily meet our Program SLOs and ensure that our students are receiving training that conforms to the needs of industry.  We are at a very critical point where the CENT program, faculty, and students are experiencing adverse effects of our work overload on an ongoing basis.

  1. Maintain/update equipment required to offer industry current curriculum for CENT 231 Telecommunications. (Outcome #2 and outcome #7)  Specific items needed to procure to maintain our Telecommunications course include:

    • Additional VIC2-2FXS Router Voice Interface cards, VIC2-2FXO Router Voice Interface Cards, and Adtran Atlas 550 T1/PRI Network Cards for CENT 231. This equipment will be used to improve coverage of voice over IP for the CENT 231 Telecommunications course. We were able to procure some cards several years ago, and additional sets of cards will provide improved support for a class of 18-24 students. (item carried over from previous year)  (Outcome #2 and outcome #7)

    • Fiberoptic installation kits to support training related to termination and splicing of fiberoptic cabling to improve support for our existing CENT 231 Telecommunications course. (item carried over from previous years.)  (Outcome #2 and outcome #7)

    • We have one fusion splicer that is misaligned and needs to be sent to the manufacturer for alignment and calibration.  This would make it possible for students in the CENT 231 Telecommunications course to get practical, hands-on experience with fiberoptic fusion splicing. (Outcome #2 and outcome #7)

  2. Establish a virtualized environment for remote lab access  (Outcome #2).  With increasing utilization of physical classroom/lab space during the academic day because we are now offering more sections of courses and will also need to offer additional courses as a result of our recent curriculum changes, the opportunities for students to work in the classroom outside of normal class times have become limited. With the support of HCC ITS, we are in the process of developing a virtualized environment that provides CENT students the ability to remotely access a virtual lab environment in which they can work to complete course assignments. This will improve accessibility to the resources students need to have to perform required course work and alleviate conflicts between courses using the physical lab/classrooms and students who need to work on lab activities for courses outside their scheduled class time. We have received some Perkins funding and have started this initiative with that funding.  This is an ongoing initiative that we have previously discussed with the campus CIO on a preliminary basis, and we have received support from ITS for the first phase of installation for this initiative.

  3. Develop Certificates of Achievement in Basic Networking and Basic Information Assurance. (Outcomes #2,  #3, and #7).  During Academic Year 2012-2013, we established Certificates of Completion in Basic Networking and Basic Information Assurance which were effective as of Fall 2013, but changes in UHCC system-wide policy have made these Certificates of Completion obsolete.  We now need to upgrade these certificates to Certificates of Achievement (this year) to conform to UHCC system-wide policy and ensure these certificate options remain available for our students. These certificate options are aligned to recommendations obtained from our industry advisory groups and provide additional pathways for students to achieve their education and training objectives in the CENT programs.

  4. Ensure CENT faculty will have sufficient time to develop and update courses for the modified CENT AS and APC programs.  We must ensure our courses meet industry standards and support the BAS in CENT at the University of West O'ahu. (Outcome #2 and outcome #7)  This requires hiring additional faculty in order to support a realistic teaching load that allows for preparation of new courses.

  5. Ensure that courses taught as part of industry established certification programs (CCNA, CCNP, MCP, VMware, Junos, A+, Security+, Linux+) are up-to-date and conform to industry standards, including equipment and faculty preparation. (Outcomes #2, #5, and #7).

  1. Continue developing the NOC classroom and data center. (Outcome #2 and outcome #7)

  1. Reapply for designation as a National Center of Academic Excellence for Information Assurance Education and Training for two year Institutions (CAE/2Y). Our application for the CAE/2Y designation was approved as of May 2013.  The criteria for the CAE/2Y designation have been updated and we must update our application and reapply in 2014 to maintain our designation. (Outcome #7)

  2. With the establishment of the Bachelor of Applied Science degree option at UH West O'ahu, we have established HCC and UHWO as recognized providers for Information Assurance training and education that conforms to national standards.  We now need to focus on increasing our recognition in the local community through our existing industry partnerships and marketing outreach. (Outcomes #2, #4, and #7)

  3. Contract professional services to help recruit non-traditional students into the program. (Outcome #4) This is anticipated to help to improve participation in and completion of CENT programs by non-traditional students to improve outcomes for Perkins Core Indicators 5P1 and 5P2.  Support from the CTE Dean for accomplishment of this objective is needed.

  4. Maintain/update equipment required to offer industry current curriculum. (Outcome #2 and outcome #7)

In addition to the telecommunications and virtualization equipment specified above, we must also maintain sufficient, operational, and up-to-date equipment to support the courses we teach across the board. Specific equipment items we have identified to date that we would like to procure contingent on availability of funds include:

We currently have sufficient routers and switches to support our courses, if offered during separate time slots. However, we now use our routers and switches more extensively to support additional courses, such as the Data Telecommunications course (CENT 231), and now recognize that we don't have enough equipment to support two courses being offered at the same time. We need to procure additional equipment so that we can support multiple courses using the same equipment at the same time. We need to procure approximately 10 additional routers, which will upgrade the supply of routers we currently have, as well as provide additional routers to support classroom needs for our networking courses and the telecommunications course.

Part IV. Resource Implications

There are resource implications our action items, as delineated below.  We will submit budget requests, as needed, and work with the Tech II Dean to obtain necessary resources. 

  1. Hire additional faculty. (Outcome #2).  We submitted a budget request for funding to hire additional faculty last year, which was not funded.  We consider this item to be high priority because of program impact - we will not be able to continue to develop and maintain our courses to meet industry standards without additional full-time faculty.  CENT funding priority: high (#1)Estimated funding:  $70,000 for one full-time faculty position not including benefits, subject to change based on administrative review and determination of actual cost.  We have prepared and submitted a budget request for AY2013 - 2014.
  2. Establish virtualized environment for remote lab access (Outcome #2).  With increasing utilization of physical classroom/lab space during the academic day because we are now offering more sections of courses and will also need to offer additional courses as a result of our recent curriculum changes, the opportunities for students to work in the classroom outside of normal class times have become more limited. With the support of HCC ITS, we are in the process of developing a virtualized environment that provides CENT students the ability to remotely access a virtual lab environment in which they can work to complete course assignments. This will improve accessibility to the resources students need to have to perform required course work and alleviate conflicts between courses using the physical lab/classrooms and students who need to work on lab activities for courses outside their scheduled class time. This is an ongoing initiative that we have previously discussed with the campus CIO on a preliminary basis.  CENT funding priority: high (#3) to provide remote lab access for various CENT courses.  Estimated cost: $10,000 for additional virtualization servers and storage area network capacity.  We have prepared and submitted a budget request for AY2013-2014.
  3. Maintain/update equipment required to offer industry current curriculum for CENT courses. (Outcome #2 and outcome #7).  Specific items needed to procure to support various CENT courses include:
  1. Develop proposals for Certificates of Achievement in Basic Networking and Basic Information Assurance.  (Outcome #2).  We need to prepare and submit curriculum proposals this academic year to replace obsolete Certificates of Completion with Certificates of Achievement.  CENT Priority:  high.  Estimated cost:  none.  We have prepared the curriculum actions for these certificates this semester.
  2. Reapply for designation as a National Center of Academic Excellence for Information Assurance Education and Training for two year Institutions (CAE/2Y). (Outcome #2 and Outcome #7). This application was completed and designation was awarded in May 2013.  However, because of changes to the CAE criteria and process, we need to resubmit an application to be redesignated in accordance with new requirements in 2014.  We anticipate this work will need to be completed during the summer 2014 to minimize impact on our academic teaching schedules.  We do not know whether there will be any funds available to support this activity or not.  CENT Priority: High, to maintain our CAE/2Y designation.  Estimated cost:  possible summer overload funding to support faculty working during summer 2014 to complete this work.
  3. Ensure CENT faculty will have sufficient time to develop and prepare courses for the newly modified CENT AS and APC programs.  Ensure these courses meet industry standards and support the BAS in CENT at UHWO. (Outcomes #2, #5, and #7). Assigned time would be needed to provide faculty time to develop new courses and update existing courses.  CENT Priority: Medium.  Funding: cost of hiring lecturers to replace faculty in class on an as-needed and as-available basis.
  4. Ensure that courses taught as part of industry established certification programs (CCNA, CCNP, MCP, VMware, Junos, A+, Security +) are up-to-date and conform to industry standards, including equipment. (Outcome #2 and outcome #7).
    • Provide opportunities for faculty to learn new material and to become or remain certified in the areas they teach. This is especially important for courses which require instructor certification. (Outcome #2, outcome #5, and outcome #7).
    • Meet with our industry/advisory committees regularly to ensure program/courses are current with industry standards. (Outcome #7) Continue to develop industry partnerships with organizations such as AFCEA, DISA, and TechNet. (Outcome #7).

Assigned time would be needed to provide faculty time to develop new courses and update existing courses CENT Priority: Medium.  Funding: cost of hiring lecturers to replace faculty in class on an as-needed basis.

  1. Continue developing the NOC classroom and data center. (Outcome #2 and outcome #7). Partner with industry to support and develop various parts of the NOC classroom and data center. (Outcome #7). Assigned time may be needed to provide faculty time to coordinate with industry partners for completion of this initiative.  CENT Priority: Medium.  Estimated funding: cost of hiring lecturers to replace faculty in class on an as-needed basis.
  2. Contract professional services to help recruit non-traditional students into the program. (Outcome #4) This is anticipated to help to improve participation in and completion of CENT programs by non-traditional students to improve outcomes for Perkins Core Indicators 5P1 and 5P2.  Support from the CTE Dean for accomplishment of this objective is needed. Estimated funding: unknown

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Apply current industry standards, protocols, and techniques; and keep up with evolving technology to maintain professional proficiency.

2

Yes
Identify, analyze and improvise solutions to resolve problems using a systematic method.

3

Yes
Use appropriate industry tools and testing equipment to analyze, troubleshoot, and install systems.

4

Yes
Install, configure, operate, and maintain systems.

5

Yes
Apply current standards for safety and security.

6

Yes
Communicate clearly and effectively through written reports and oral presentations.

7

Yes
Work effectively, independently, and interdependently, in diverse situations involving stress, teams, co-workers, customers, vendors, organizational partners and supervisors.

8

Yes
Demonstrate professionalism and integrity in supporting the mission of the organization.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

The CENT program has established solid relationships with the ICT industry as shown by our partnerships with, the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA), Verizon Business, and the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA). In 2012 the CENT program received a large donation of telecommunications workstation and data center racks from DISA and is currently in the process of building an innovative network operation center (NOC) classroom and data center. This NOC classroom and data center is already being used to teach advanced technical courses in Networking and Telecommunications, Information Assurance, and Virtualization. Partnerships with  various industry organizations support this project.

The CENT program supports many different vendor-specific and vendor-neutral certifications. Supported ICT industry certifications include: CompTIA A+, Security+, and Linux+; Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CCNA) and Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP); Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP), and VMware Certified Professional (VCP).

Aaron Tanaka met with a special Advisory Committee, comprised of former CENT students now working in ICT-related career fields, in June 2013.The focus of this meeting was to solicit feedback and recommendations regarding how the CENT program can better align the skills emphasized in CENT courses to match skills needed and used in industry.

All CENT students are required to successfully complete a Cooperative Education or Internship course as part of the CENT AS degree. Approximately 30 students per year enroll in Coop(Cent 293V) and Internship (Cent 290V) courses. Employers include Honolulu CC, UH Manoa, Kapiolani CC, UH Research Corporation, Blackbird, Camber Corporation, Computer Doctor, DMBGI Consultants, Ke Ola Mamo, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Net Enterprise, Oceanic Time Warner, Tahiti Imports, and WKF, Inc. Based upon the results of the employer evaluations of CENT students in cooperative education/internship courses, our students perform satisfactorily or better in their internship assignments.

The CENT program also partners with the Akamai Internship program which has selected at least two CENT students each summer for the past five years to participate in their paid internship program on the Big Island and Maui.

In 2012, the CENT program was certified as meeting two national standards for information assurance training:  (1) the National Security Telecommunications and Information Systems Security Instruction 4011 National Training Standard For Information Systems Security (Infosec) Professionals (NSTISSI 4011) and (2) the Committee on National Systems Security  Instruction 4012 National Information Assurance Training Standard For Senior System Managers (CNSS 4012). These standards were developed by the Committee on National Systems Security (CNSS) which is supported by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The CENT program in partnership with the Pacific Center for Advanced Technical Training (PCATT) also applied for and Honolulu Community College was subsequently designated as a National Center of Academic Excellence for Information Assurance Education and Training for 2 year institutions (CAE/2Y).  HCC is currently the only institution in Hawaii designated as a Center of Academic Excellence for Information Assurance Education and Training at either the 2-year or 4-year level.

B) Expected Level Achievement

We expect all students to demonstrate satisfactory achievement of course SLOs as a prerequisite for receiving a passing grade for each course. Consequently, we construct our course assignments and methods of examination to verify that students demonstrate a overall satisfactory level of accomplishment for course SLOs every semester.

C) Courses Assessed

During the 2012-2013 Academic Year, we formally assessed achievement of Student Learning Outcomes for the following courses:

Inventory sheets for all assessed courses can be found at:

http://programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/node/1625

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

We formally assess and collect evidence of student achievement of program learning outcomes using a variety of methods including hands-on student laboratories, work habits evaluation, student written projects, student oral reports, student group projects, written exams, and hands-on (skills) exams.

Informally, we observe on an ongoing basis that our students demonstrate increased proficiency and knowledge of Information and Communication Technology as they progress through the program.  By the time they graduate from CENT programs, and in particular the AS, all students visibly demonstrate satisfactory performance and growth with respect to all of the Program SLOs. Clearly, we take pride in our superstars, but we are also very aware and proud that all of our students demonstrate visible growth in the program.

We have also mapped CENT course SLOs to the CENT program SLOs. All courses show strong support for program SLOs, with all program SLOs addressed by multiple courses.  The most recent mapping of course SLOs to program SLOs was completed during summer 2012.  The CENT Program Curriculum Maps are posted online at http://programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/sites/programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu.intranet/files/CENT2%20Program%20Map.pdf

CENT students are also required to complete an Internship (CENT 290V) or Cooperative Education (CENT 293V) course as part of the CENT AS degree. A review of the employer feedback completed as part of the 2012 comprehensive 5 year program review reflected that CENT students participating in Internship or Cooperative Education met or exceeded employer expectations with respect to achievement of CENT program SLOs.

E) Results of Program Assessment

As a result of the course SLO achievement completed during the 2012-2013 academic,  we determined that our students are usually meeting our course SLOs, but our course SLOs in many cases need to be updated to match changes in our courses, or refined to improve the assessment process and to eliminate unnecessary repetition between different SLOs.  In other cases, possible ways to improve the course delivery were identified.

Based on an ongoing comprehensive review of the CENT program courses over the prior three years, the CENT program implemented a comprehensive update of the CENT Associate of Science (AS) and Advanced Professional Certificate (APC) programs during 2012-2013. These program modifications and new courses brought the CENT programs up to current technology standards and improved support for the first three years of the articulated Bachelors of Applied Science Degree in CENT at the University of Hawai'i at West O'ahu. These program modifications also provided more options for advanced technical training in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and ensured that courses in the CENT AS and APC programs have the rigor and complexity that support a bachelor's program.  Course and program modifications for the CENT AS degree implemented during 2012-2013 for the 2013-2014 academic year included combining the CENT 130 Microcomputer Operating Systems and CENT 131 Microcomputer Hardware courses into a single course CENT 132 ICT Support, trimming credits for other courses from 4 to 3 to make room for a new CENT 275 Security Essentials course and allow CENT AS students with the ability to take additional elective courses

Program and course modifications for the CENT APC program implemented during 2012-2013 for the 2013-2014 academic year included trimming all 300 level courses within the CENT APC program from four credits to three credits to give CENT students the opportunity to take more 300 level elective courses. The new three credit structure better aligns these courses to baccalaureate course offerings in other ICT programs. In addition, four new courses were developed based on industry recommendations for Telecommunications (SONET, ATM, MPLS, Carrier Ethernet), Junos Routing, Cloud Services and Virtualization.

During the 2013-2014 academic year, we are monitoring the results of the program and course modifications to identify further adjustments that need to be made to refine the flow of the programs.

F) Other Comments

Resource Concerns

G) Next Steps

In order to improve systematic assessment of CENT program SLOs, the CENT program needs to: