University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kapiolani Community College
Program: Respiratory Care Practitioner

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2013, and can be viewed at:
http://ofie.kapiolani.hawaii.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/cpr2013respiratorycare.pdf
STEM Program

Program Description

Program Description

The Respiratory Care Practitioner Program is a physician-directed, nationally accredited, health science specialty, caring for patients with disorders of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. The program at Kapi'olani Community College, the only accredited respiratory care program in Hawaii serving students from throughout the state, prepares students for a career as a respiratory care practitioner (RCP).  It is also the career pathway to becoming a Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT).

The career pathway begins with successful completion of the two-year Kapi’olani CC program, where graduates will earn an Associate in Science Degree and are eligible to take the Entry-Level Examination of the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). After passing the Entry-Level examination, graduates will be awarded the Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT) credential.  After completing the CRT credential, graduates will be eligible to take the Advanced-Practitioner Examinations of the NBRC.  Upon passing the two examinations, the individual will be awarded the Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) credential. The CRT and RRT credentials are recognized in the United States and several other countries. The CRT credential is required in approximately 49 states (including Hawaii) as part of eligibility for a license to work as an RCP.

There is a career ladder offered via the Baccalaureate Degree in Applied Science through the Mananawai program with UH West Oahu for KCC students completing the A.S. degree in Respiratory Care.

The mission of Kapi’olani Community College’s Health Education Unit is to develop and deliver student-centered health career programs that employ industry standards through partnerships with the healthcare community by:

The mission of the Respiratory Care Program is to follow the Health Education Unit as well as to serve the needs of the Respiratory community through the program mission by:  

  1. Providing a respiratory care practitioner program that will meet the respiratory care personnel needs of the State of Hawaii.
  2. Providing advanced practitioner level respiratory care program.
  3. Providing a competency-based, success-oriented learning environment that is germane to local and national standards for the practice of respiratory care.
  4. Providing students with a relevant curriculum so that they may achieve their career and personal goals.
  5. Providing high quality faculty in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical areas.
  6.  Providing continuing education programs for the respiratory care community

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Healthy

Majors Included: RESP     Program CIP: 51.0908

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 16 19 18 Healthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 14 5 16
3 *Number of Majors 28.5 32 26
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 2 5 7
3b     Fall Full-Time 50% 52% 50%
3c     Fall Part-Time 50% 48% 50%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 3% 0% 0%
3e     Spring Full-Time 59% 52% 46%
3f     Spring Part-Time 41% 48% 54%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 0% 0%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 801 685 698
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 50 11 52
6 SSH in All Program Classes 851 696 750
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 28 23 25
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 24 17 24

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 10.7 11.8 9.3 Healthy
10 *Fill Rate 93.1% 96.6% 86.1%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 4 4 3
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 7.1 8 8.6
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 8.8 13.7 8.1
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 3.2 2.3 3.2
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $256,724 $258,830 $304,200
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $256,724 $236,724 $249,288
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $22,106 $54,912
15 Cost per SSH $302 $372 $406
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 12 8 12
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 98% 97% 98% Healthy
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 2 4 4
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 90% 90.9% 96.1%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     92.3%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 11 12 15
20a Degrees Awarded 11 12 15
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 0
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported 100%
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 2 0 1
22a Transfers with credential from program 1 0 1
22b Transfers without credential from program 1 0 0

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes N/A N/A N/A
25 Fill Rate N/A N/A N/A
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) N/A N/A N/A
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) N/A N/A N/A
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) N/A N/A N/A

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 100.00 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 78.95 Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 89.47 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 83.33 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 55.88 Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 53.33 Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     15  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     3
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     15
38 Number of Pell Recipients     8
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     1
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

DEMAND INDICATORS

The program moved from unhealthy in 2011 - 2012 ARPD to healthy this year due primalry to the increase in the number of new and replacment positions in the State and County.  

It is important to note that the program has had a steady increase in Native Hawaiian students since 2010.  There were 2 Native Hawaiian students in 2010-2011 and for 2012-13 there are 7 Native Hawaiian students.

While the State labor data shows 18 positions in the state with 16 in county, there is a concern with the workforce trend which appears to be increasing in hiring of part-time employees. 

EFFICIENCY and EFFECTIVENESS INDICATORS 

The program efficiency and effectiveness indictors show the program to be "healthy"   The class fill rate dipped slightly this year but conitnues to remain well above the 75% benchmark for a healthy program.   This is also true for the ratio of faculty to students.  In addition, the number of degrees has increased and persistence is close to 100%.

Part III. Action Plan

Action Plan

Long term plans for the Respiratory Care Pracitioner program are guided by the college’s strategic plan.  In the intermediate term, plans are guided by the program’s three-year comprehensive program review (CPR).  The actions indicated in this report provide short term measures which will contribute to the goals of the three year comprehensive program review, aligned with the college’s strategic plan.

The program responded to the availability of program clinical sites and job placement concerns for graduates which arose from the closing of HMC Medical Centers.  The main consequence of the closure was the loss of 20% of our clinical training facilities, there was also a recognition that fewer RTs would be hired until the facilities were replaced or reopened.

The effect of the HMC Medical Center closure was that approximately 30-35 experienced RTs were displaced and flooded the job market leaving far fewer positions for inexperienced new graduates.  We reduced the class size for the 2014 cohort that started in July of 2012 (class of '14) to 12 from the usual 16 students. The cohort admitted this past summer returned to 16 students and we began the fall semester with 28 students in the program.

The program plan for this coming year is to track the opening of a new healthcare facility, now expected to open in March of 2014.  The program will increase to maximum capacity to keep pace with the excepted increase in workforce data projections.

To maintain the prorgams skill attainment rate and better prepare student for clinical placements, simulation scenarios are to be part of the curriculum, see Perkins Indicator 1P1.  Program faculty will need to be to trained to meet this objective.

Invite new members to the Advisory Board to expand financial support to the program.

Part IV. Resource Implications

Resource Implications

To meet the demand of workforce training, the equipment used to train students nust meet industry standards.  The program equipment currently meets those standards and is also incorporating simulation scenario training to address the squeeze in clinical space.

The Progam Advisory Council continues to assist the program by providing student facility placements.

Implementation of the action plan requires the hiring of one faculty member at which time the program will return to maximum capacity of 16 students per cohort.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Assimilate and apply relevant knowledge necessary to function competently as an advanced-level respiratory therapist.

2

Yes
Perform technical and clinical skills necessary to function competently as an advanced-level respiratory therapist.

3

Yes
Demonstrate professional & ethical behavior skills necessary to function as an advanced-level respiratory therapist.

4

Yes
Communicate & interact appropriately & effectively.

5

Yes
Incorporate knowledge of multicultural perspectives to meet the needs of diverse populations.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC).

Graduates of the Associate of Science Degree progam are eligible to take the Entry-Level Examination of the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). After passing the Entry-Level examination, graduates will be awarded the Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT) credential.  After completing the CRT credential, graduates will be eligible to take the Advanced-Practitioner Examinations of the NBRC.  Upon passing the two examinations, the individual will be awarded the Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) credential. The CRT and RRT credentials are recognized in the United States and several other countries. The CRT credential is required in approximately 49 states (including Hawaii) as part of eligibility for a license to work as an RCP.

The program has been a recipient of a recognition award from the CoARC for distinguished success in credentialing of our graduates.  The program has a 3-year average of 97% of graduates earning the RRT credential is among the top 5% of programs in the nation.

B) Expected Level Achievement

SLO 1- The expected outcome evidence is measured by students obtaining credentialing as a RRT.  The program has a 100% success rate. This program learning outcome is found in the expecation of graduates to earn the RRT credential which is the standard of excellence for the profession.

SLO 2- The expected program outcome for technicial and clinical skill training requires that 70% of the students obatin the required accreditation threshold.   The program has consistently surpassed this benchmark, with a range from 89.5% in 2010 to 100% in 2012-13.

SLO 3- The expected program outcome for students demonstrating professional and ethical behavior is 100%.  The accrediting survey shows that the program succeeded in meeting the outcome.

SLO 4- All students are expected to be able to communicate with clients and staff.    The program survey data shows the all students met this SLO.

SLO 5- The program learning outcome is that 100% of students will incorportate knowledge of multicultural population groups.  The program survey data shows all students meet this SLO.

C) Courses Assessed

All program courses are assessed each year.  Students are required to successfully pass each course in order to continue in the program, which means that there is continuous assessment in each semester and in the summer term.

The capstone courses are Resp 320 and 322, are the final program senior courses which determine whether a student will graduate from the program and take the credential exam for employment as an RRT.

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Assessment instruments are secured assessment exams provided by the accrediting body to assist students in passing the credential exams.

Clinical evaluations by program faculty and clinical instructors assure clinical, psychomotor, ethical, communication, and multicultural competence.

Final assessment is done 6 months to 1 year post-graduation per our accrediting standards.  Employer surveys and graduate surveys show true outcomes of the education provided in the program.

E) Results of Program Assessment

Program Assessment

NBRC CRT Credentialing Exam:  Outcome 100% pass rate 2012

RRT Credentialing Exam: Outcome 100% pass rate for 2012

Employer Satisfaction Survey: Outcome 100% indicated graduates were rated above the benchmark (2012)

Graduate and Employer surveys:  Outcome 100% Employers indicated satisfaction with professional behavior for C/O ’10-’12, 100% of graduates indicated same for the same period

Graduate and Employer surveys:  Outcome 100% of Employers and graduates indicate satisfaction with communication skills c/o ’10-‘12

Graduate and Employer surveys:  Outcome  All respondents (100%) on both surveys indicate satisfaction with multicultural knowledge

F) Other Comments

Counseling SLOs for use across campus were developed in 2010.  Since that time, units have assessed these SLOs.  Completed templates and summaries of the assessment cycle for counseling support of this program are available at the OFIE website at http://ofie.kapiolani.hawaii.edu/program-review.

In an effort to better align terminology and respond to feedback gained in previous assessment cycles, on November 21 and 22, 2013, an assessment retreat was held to revise these SLOs.  The revised Counseling SLOs will be assessed in the upcoming year.

G) Next Steps

Job placement as an outcome is a function of the economy.   HMC Medical Centers’ closure in 2011 is still being felt. As a result of the medical center closures, the program reduced the cohort size temporarily from 16 to 12 students for the class of 2014.  It is anticipated that jobs will become available as the economy continues to improve and when HMC West reopens (scheduled for Spring 2014).  As noted in the demand indicators the number of jobs are increasing.  Every effort is made by the program faculty to assist graduates in finding employment, including those wishing to relocate to another state.

Continue to offer exam preparation and hands-on clinical as well as NBRC style testing in program.