University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kauai Community College
Program: Business Technology

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2008, and can be viewed at:
http://info.kauai.hawaii.edu/admin/prapru.htm#apru09

Program Description

The Secretarial Science program began in 1965 when Kauai Community College became part of the University of Hawaii Community College System. In 1991, following PCC (Program Coordinating Council) recommendations, the program changed its name to Office Administration and Technology (OAT) to better reflect industry trends. Effective Fall 1997, most OAT courses were converted to 100-level numbering, also as a result of PCC recommendations. Since Fall 2006, the PCC agreed to change from OAT to Business Technology (BTEC).

The campus currently has one full-time faculty member who serves as both BTEC instructor and program coordinator.  It also has one position under BTEC (which is currently vacant) that teaches general business courses, and all other BTEC courses (BUS/BUSN alpha) are taught by part-time lecturers.

The BTEC program directly serves the mission of the college by providing business technology education and training in a caring, student-focused, and intellectually stimulating environment. The program prepares students/graduates for entry-level clerical positions, provides opportunities for updating office skills, and contributes to the development of life-long learners who think critically, appreciate diversity, and lead successful, independent, socially responsible, and personally fulfilling lives.

The BTEC program prepares students for employment in government and industry positions such as administrative assistants, information processors, receptionists, clerks, and secretaries. Our mission is to provide quality education that will prepare students for immediate employment with opportunities for advancement in office occupations in the global marketplace.  Additionally, we promote positive work ethics and attitudes. The program offers the following degrees and certificates:

  1. Certificate of Completion, Business Technology (Office Assistant) <13 credits>
  2. Certificate of Completion, Business Technology <21 credits>
  3. Certificates of Achievement, Business Technology <33 credits>
  4. Associate in Applied Science, Business Technology <60 credits>
  5. Certificate of Completion, Medical Office Receptionist (NEW) <23 credits>
  6. Certificate of Completion, Virtual Office Assistant (NEW) <19 credits>

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: BTEC     Program CIP: 52.0401

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 695 271 271 Unhealthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 33 12 11
3 *Number of Majors 55.5 63.5 62
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 20 24 20
3b     Fall Full-Time 29% 56% 42%
3c     Fall Part-Time 71% 44% 58%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 5% 0% 0%
3e     Spring Full-Time 35% 37% 45%
3f     Spring Part-Time 65% 63% 55%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 4% 3% 2%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 506 682 552
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 706 992 1,019
6 SSH in All Program Classes 1,212 1,674 1,571
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 40 56 52
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 41 49 52

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 13.7 16.3 14.8 Healthy
10 *Fill Rate 66.2% 75.9% 67%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 3 3 2
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 18.5 21.1 31
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 18.1 16.5 15.8
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 3.1 3.9 3.9
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $226,365 $186,923 $227,690
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $226,365 $185,505 $227,155
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $1,418 $535
15 Cost per SSH $187 $112 $145
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 11 9 11
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 75% 81% 73% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 24 38 47
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 58.6% 80.3% 59%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     35%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 11 19 19
20a Degrees Awarded 7 9 13
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 6 4 6
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 7 11 13
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 2 2 2
22a Transfers with credential from program 1 1 1
22b Transfers without credential from program 1 1 1

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 2 5 10  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes 36 95 200
25 Fill Rate 82% 86% 87%
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 50% 66% 52%
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 2 8 14
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) 81% 67% 67%

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 80.00 Not Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 40.00 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 77.78 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 68.18 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 12.00 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 16.67 Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     19  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     1
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
38 Number of Pell Recipients     47
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     2
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Results of Prior Year's Action Plan

The BTEC Coordinator is actively involved in the BTEC Program Coordinating Council (PCC) which meets on a quarterly basis to review programs and courses.  We develop and design courses, certificates, and action plans of BTEC courses. BTEC colleagues provide support and guidance to each other by providing course syllabi, grading rubrics, assessment tools, presentations and lectures, and best practices tips. Based on this collaboration and input from the BTEC Advisory Board, the BTEC Program Evaluation goals for last year were successfully achieved and are stated as follows:

  1. Review/Revise BTEC Program to better meet industry demand.
  2. Meet with Advisory, Counselors, PCC, and colleagues to evaluate current offerings.
  3. Conduct research to align courses with current practices.
  4. Meet ACCJC Gen Ed requirements to delete non-transfer level courses from PAR.
  5. Develop articulation with UH West Oahu.

The status of the above are as follows:

  1. Existing courses were updated and streamlined
  2. BTEC COs and PARs were developed and are in the process of being approved
  3. Two new certificate programs (Medical Office Receptionist and Virtual Office Assistant) have been developed for implementation in the Fall 2014
  4. The UHWO articulation proposal has been drafted.

The BTEC program is sequenced in a career-ladder structure so that students can fulfill the BTEC basic competencies and attain a certificate of completion (CC) and/or certificate of achievement (CA) on their way to completing the associate in applied science (AAS).  However, data for 2005-2013 shows that of the 75 AAS graduates, only 27 received a CA and 41 received a CC. It appears that over the next two years students could be encouraged to apply for the certificates as they are on their way to the AAS. This would be a win-win situation that would not only increase completion of degrees and certificates but also ensure that students attain a certificate to prepare them for employment if they stop out on their way to the AAS.

According to health indicators, enrollment is stabilizing as records show that the enrollment increased slowly since 2008 and declined slightly in 2013 (2008-09=50, 2009-10=54, 2010-11=56, 2011-12=64, 2012-13=62.).  Graduation rates have also experienced changes with two bursts in 2010 and 2013 (2008=5, 2009=5, 2010=13, 2011=7, 2012=9, and 2013=13). 

The Health Education (HED) and Business Education Division’s (BED) BTEC are collaborating to provide Medical Office Receptionist (MOR) certificate of competence effective Fall 2014 in response to the Nursing Advisory Board’s recommendation to address the shortage of medical office receptionists on Kaua`i.  Colleagues from within the UHCC system are generously providing information on curriculum and best practices, and we (HED and BED) are gathering data from local medical clinics to develop a new program to address the current shortfall.

There is also a multi-campus partnership with BTEC instructors at Leeward Community College, Hawai`i Community College, and Maui College on a Perkins proposal to create a 23-credit Virtual Office Assistant (VOA) Course and Certificate Program. The plan is to incorporate new, existing, and online courses in a program where students acquire the skills to run a virtual home office. The target date of offering is Fall 2014. A faculty member in Language Arts and Humanities has committed to teaching a VOA course. The challenge right now is that each campus has a different set of criteria and processes for course proposals, and it’s time consuming to adapt to our individual requirements.

 

There is a push to increase the number of distance learning courses offered by the College. The BTEC Program is currently assessing how many of its courses are appropriate for distance learning delivery. At the top of the list is the Virtual Office Assistant Certificate of Completion, which is a prime candidate for online delivery.  However, student success in distance courses is discouraging.  Records show that of the BUSN courses that are offered both online and face-to-face, 47% of online students pass with a C or better compared to 84% of face-to-face students who pass with a C or better. This is an alarming spread that must be studied and solved before more BUSN courses are offered online.

The BTEC program is doing fairly well in its successful completion rates over the past five cycles (82%; 73%; 75%; 81%; 73%). The number of unduplicated degrees and certificates awarded has fluctuated (8; 16; 11; 19; 12) as did the number of majors (50; 54; 56; 64; 62), but overall this figures have leveled off. What has changed dramatically is the number of new and replacement positions for the state (855; 679; 695; 271; 271) and county (31; 29; 33; 12; 11) which led to an unhealthy status in the demand indicator. This reduction in state and county positions is a shift from previous years when graduates could seek the security of civil service employment. Graduates now compete for fewer jobs.

In terms of non-traditional students in the BTEC program, about one in every ten students in the BTEC AAS program is male and one in three is of Native Hawaiian ancestry.  This represents a shortfall in the strategic goal of increasing non-traditional and Native Hawaiian enrollment. Perhaps marketing efforts need to be diverse and focused such as including success stories of graduates, particularly focusing on the male and Hawaiian population since they are underrepresented.

Part III. Action Plan

Program Goal & Campus

Strategic

Priority or Goal

Action Item

Timeline

PLO impacted

ACCESS: To provide open access to educational excellence for a diverse student population.

 

 

 

  1. Outreach

 

Increase non-traditional students in CTE programs

Attract more non-traditional students (males) into BTEC

 

 

Fall 2014

Apply appropriate strategies to secure employment, retain a job, and advance in a career.

Native Hawaiian students

Attract more Native Hawaiian students to BTEC

Collaborate with Hawaiian Studies faculty

Fall 2014

Apply appropriate strategies to secure employment, retain a job, and advance in a career.

Increase and improve design and delivery of distance learning offerings

  • Review the existing design and delivery of distance learning offerings
  • Strategize ways to improve success rates
  • Revise curriculum as needed
  • Provide professional development for distance learning faculty

Fall 2014

Use current and emerging technologies effectively to create and manage documents and handle multiple priorities.

Increase completion of degrees and certificates

Review the process of declaring majors and receiving certificates

 

Develop plan for students to declare certificates  when they register for the AAS

Spring 2014

Apply appropriate strategies to secure employment, retain a job, and advance in a career.

LEARNING & TEACHING: To promote excellence in learning and in teaching for transfer, career/technical, remedial/developmental education and lifelong learning.

 

 

 

  1. Articulation

 

Improve partnerships with K-12 to improve college preparation and to ensure that students are aware of specific opportunities that KCC provides

  • Review DCAPs agreement
  • Meet with high school counselors and counterparts
  • Participate in College and Career Fairs, high school fairs, parent night

Fall 2015

Apply appropriate strategies to secure employment, retain a job, and advance in a career.

2.1 Curriculum

Relevant curriculum development

  • Develop curriculum for health fields
  • Develop curriculum for new and emerging degrees

Fall 2014

 

Fall 2016 = AA in place

Apply appropriate strategies to secure employment, retain a job, and advance in a career.

  1. Remedial/Developmental

 

Address the learning needs of under-performing students

Revise the curriculum  to design and Integrate career success activities

Fall 2014-Ongoing

Apply appropriate strategies to secure employment, retain a job, and advance in a career.

2.6 Faculty & Staff

Increase current FTE faculty

Hire FTE Faculty with specialty in distance learning education

Fall 2014

Apply appropriate strategies to secure employment, retain a job, and advance in a career.

2.7 Facilities

Renovate and update computer labs

  • Renovate BUS 110
  • Renovate BUS 111
  • Purchase tables and chairs

Fall 2016

Use current and emerging technologies effectively to create and manage documents and handle multiple priorities.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT: To provide a trained workforce by offering programs that prepare students for both employment and future career development.

 

 

 

3.2 Transfer

 

Add a benchmark for graduates who transfer to four-year institutions

Benchmark added to outcomes

Spring 2014

Apply appropriate strategies to secure employment, retain a job, and advance in a career.

Increase job placement through new curriculum

  • Develop Medical Office Receptionist Certificate
  • Develop Virtual Office Assistant Certificate

Fall  2014

Apply appropriate strategies to secure employment, retain a job, and advance in a career.

Increase job placement through better coordination with business and industry

Advisory committee input

Spring 2015

Apply appropriate strategies to secure employment, retain a job, and advance in a career.

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT: To provide life-long learning opportunities in the areas of personal and professional development.

 

 

 

  1. Faculty/Staff Development

 

Professional development related to increasing and improving design and delivery of distance learning offerings

Develop training for distance learning faculty

Spring 2014 - Ongoing

Use current and emerging technologies effectively to create and manage documents and handle multiple priorities.

Professional development related to addressing the learning needs of under-performing students

 

Find training for faculty and lecturers

Summer 2014

Apply appropriate strategies to secure employment, retain a job, and advance in a career.

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: To contribute to community development and enrichment through campus leadership and collaboration.

 

 

 

  1. Collaboration

Establish collaboration with business and industry

Increase partnerships Cooperative Education placement sites

Fall 2015

Work as a responsible member of a team to meet an organization’s objectives.

DIVERSITY: To foster global understanding and appreciation for diversity.

 

 

 

  1. Diversity

Provide support for diversity and cultural awareness

Promote teamwork and collaborative cultural awareness activities in the curriculum

Fall 2015

Demonstrate professionalism in work quality, appearance, attitude, and workplace behavior as required in a diverse business environment.

Part IV. Resource Implications

The greatest weakness of the BTEC faculty and staff lies in the limited number of full-time BTEC faculty and over dependence on lecturers. As lecturers come and go, the program’s course stability is affected, and the program coordinator expends time and energy in retraining new staff.  With two new certificates in the pipeline for Fall 2014 and plans for adding a certificate of achievement, the one full-time instructor will be stretched to cover more program-area courses.  BTEC needs to consider adding at least one dedicated position to address this shortfall especially during the two-year overlap period.  This person must also have a solid foundation and proven experience in delivering distance education.

In terms of facilities, Room 110 is the larger computer lab and is in need of renovation to replace the old, moldy cabinets or remove them altogether.  This is a potential health hazard that needs to be resolved. We would also like to propose purchasing computer tables with built-in power strips and possibly add or relocate power receptacles depending upon the new layout.  One consideration is that when the new HVAC system is installed in the Business building, it might be an opportune time to install either drop cords or other similar options and remove moldy cabinets.  BUS 111 is the smaller lab with 16 stations and has inadequate air conditioning and very little circulation. This has been reported over the past two years but will apparently be resolved when the new HVAC system is installed. The ceiling also leaked during a heavy downpour last year which brings concerns of mold growth in both classrooms.  This is a potential health hazard that also needs to be resolved. Finally, the carpet in the central area is worn and moldy and may be in need of attention and replacement.

In Fall 2014, BTEC would like to upgrade its two computer labs (40 stations) to Microsoft Office 2013.

 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
Work as a responsible member of a team to meet an organization’s objectives.

2

Yes
Demonstrate professionalism in work quality, appearance, attitude, and workplace behavior as required in a diverse business environment.

3

Yes
Use current and emerging technologies effectively to create and manage documents and handle multiple priorities.

4

Yes
Communicate clearly and effectively through oral and written interactions, complying with standard office etiquette.

5

Yes
Use research and decision-making skills to make informed choices consistent with personal and organizational goals.

6

Yes
Apply appropriate strategies to secure employment, retain a job, and advance in a career.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

BTEC PCC representatives meet three to four times a year to review and update courses and SLOs, share resources and teaching strategies, discuss current industry trends and requirements, and integrate new teaching methods and advanced technology in BTEC courses. The committee recently worked with a consultant to align BUSN 164, 170, and 193V.  Using the National Business Education’s National Standards for Business Education, the PCC refined course descriptions, SLOs, course content, concepts and skills, learning assessment tasks, assessment outlines/blueprints, assessment weighting, and methods of instruction; developed grading rubrics for evaluating portfolios, projects, presentations, and various assignments; and reviewed textbook resources and developed test banks for each of the courses.  The updated BTEC PCC agreement is systematically reviewed and updated to ensure currency and effectiveness; it is an efficient process which requires improvement.    <BTEC PCC Articulation Agreement Link: http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/app/aa/articulation/BTArticulation_Agreement_aug_08.pdf>

The BTEC PCC relies on input from its advisory board, national publications, state publications, and other reported statistical information to determine workforce trends. For example, U.S. News and World Report (http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/rankings/best-business-jobs) ranks the Executive Assistant as #10, Administrative Assistant as #21, and Receptionist as #22 of the 24 best business jobs in 2013.  According to the Employment Projections for Industries and Occupations 2008-2018 report prepared by the State of Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, the Office and Administrative Support Occupations listed 4,680 jobs in 2008 and projected 4,970 jobs in 2018.  This is a 6.2% growth.

In a recent article about career planning (http://education-portal.com/cm/10_great_degrees_to_help_you_find_a_job.html), it states that “hands down, the fastest growing industry in the U.S. is healthcare.” Of particular interest is the fact that demands for medical secretaries will see a 41 percent growth from 2010-2020. This information solidifies that the decision to offer a Medical Office Receptionist certificate is a good move in diversifying program offerings at the College. Furthermore, the BTEC coordinator plans to pilot test the certificate of completion for the first two years and then increase to a certificate of achievement.

The BTEC Program does not have data on licensure/certification because it is not applicable.

B) Expected Level Achievement

Program student learning outcomes are reviewed and assessed every four years or sooner, if required, by the BTEC PCC.  Course SLOs are monitored and evaluated every semester.  Students are assessed on CSLOs with a benchmark of 70% and results are calculated via assessment cards.

Results of the assessment are as follows:

  1. Written Communication (434 assessed), 78% met benchmark
  2. Oral Communication (124 assessed), 82% met benchmark
  3. Research Skills (132 assessed), 98% met benchmark
  4. Critical Thinking (293 assessed), 84% met benchmark
  5. Employment Strategies (55 assessed), 87% met benchmark
  6. Technology Use (235 assessed), 86% met benchmark
  7. Teamwork (22 assessed), 100% met benchmark
  8. Professionalism and Ethics (160 assessed), 94% met benchmark

C) Courses Assessed

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Student learning outcomes (SLOs) from the course to program to institutional level are assessed in multiple places (course outlines, comprehensive program review, and annual program review update).  All instructors use a variety of assessment methods such as performance-based assessments, traditional exams, presentations, written assignments, and portfolios.  The program- and course-level student learning outcomes for the BTEC program are succinct and are evaluated on course-level assessment CARDS.   These cards report if students have met course SLO (CSLO) benchmarks (70% or higher) and provide an opportunity to see what adjustments need to be made to help students succeed in achieving a particular course SLO.  Currently, CSLOs in BTEC courses are continually being updated as part of the Business Education Division’s five-year review plan. Reports for the past semesters’ worth of cards are reviewed annually and improvements are put in place the following semester.

E) Results of Program Assessment

The results of these assessments are systematically used to improve teaching methods. The following is a small sample from 2012-13 CARDS of how course-specific results are analyzed and used:

The overall results of BTEC's PSLOs for all relevant courses are as follows:

Program PSLO # PSLO Title # of Assessments % Met Benchmark
Business Technology 1a Written Communication--BTEC 434 78
Business Technology 1b Oral Communication--BTEC 124 82
Business Technology 2a Research Skills--BTEC 132 98
Business Technology 2b Critical Thinking--BTEC 293 84
Business Technology 3 Employment Strategies 55 87
Business Technology 4 Technology Use 236 86
Business Technology 5 Teamwork 22 100
Business Technology 6 Professionalism and Ethics--BTEC 160 94

F) Other Comments

The BTEC program is doing fairly well in its successful completion rates over the past five cycles (82%; 73%; 75%; 81%; 73%). The number of unduplicated degrees and certificates awarded has fluctuated (8; 16; 11; 19; 12) as did the number of majors (50; 54; 56; 64; 62), but overall this figures have leveled off. What has changed dramatically is the number of new and replacement positions for the state (855; 679; 695; 271; 271) and county (31; 29; 33; 12; 11) which led to an unhealthy status in the demand indicator. This reduction in state and county positions is a shift from previous years when graduates could seek the security of civil service employment. Graduates now compete for fewer jobs.

Full-time faculty resources are an area that needs improvement. It’s business as usual but the structure of the program is growing and the number of FTE BOR appointed faculty has declined. Since the retirement of two BTEC-dedicated, full-time faculty members in 2010, only one BTEC-dedicated faculty provides both instruction and program coordinator duties. With two new certificates underway in Fall 2014 and additional program assessments, improvements, and planning demands, the program needs stable collegial support in order to operate more effectively. The BTEC program not only manages the instruction of dedicated BTEC courses but also courses that are required for the entire Business Education Division (Hospitality, Accounting, AS in Business). As of this writing there are 23 BUS or BUSN courses offered in the Business Education Division, and only 11 of them are specific to BTEC majors.

The Virtual Office Assistant certificate is unchartered territory that also requires curriculum revision if it is to be offered purely online.  It is also the area where instructors will need continual professional development to stay abreast of new and emerging technology. Results show that students are not doing as well in their distance learning courses as they are in face-to-face courses, and this is the biggest area that needs improvement. Students are not meeting benchmarks, and this must be addressed before any new distance learning courses are offered out of the Business Education Division.

G) Next Steps

Program Goal & Campus

Strategic

Priority or Goal

Action Item

Resources Needed

Person(s) Responsible

Timeline

  1. Outreach

 

 

Increase non-traditional students in CTE programs

Attract more non-traditional students (males) into BTEC

 

 

  • Time
  • Marketing tools
  • Color printer (existing)
  • Paper
  • Marketing Director
  • Program Coordinator

Fall 2014

Native Hawaiian students

Attract more Native Hawaiian students to BTEC

 

Collaborate with Hawaiian Studies faculty

  • Time
  • Marketing tools
  • Color printer (existing)
  • Paper
  • Marketing Director
  • Program Coordinator
  • Hawaiian Studies faculty

Fall 2014

Increase and improve design and delivery of distance learning offerings

Review the existing design and delivery of distance learning offerings

Strategize ways to improve success rates

Revise curriculum as needed

Provide professional development for distance learning faculty

Reassigned Time

Information provided by Institutional Researcher

  • BTEC Coordinator
  • Institutional Researcher
  • Division Chair
  • Distance Learning Coordinator
  • Professional Development Committee

Fall 2014

Increase completion of degrees and certificates

Review the process of declaring majors and receiving certificates

Develop plan for students to declare certificates  when they register for the AAS

Time

  • BTEC Coordinator
  • Counseling and Advising
  • Registrar

 

 

Spring 2014

  1. Articulation

 

Improve partnerships with K-12 to improve college preparation and to ensure that students are aware of specific opportunities that KCC provides

Review DCAPs agreement

Meet with high school counselors and counterparts

Participate in College and Career Fairs, high school fairs, parent night

Time

  • BTEC Coordinator
  • VCAA
  • High School Counselors & Teachers

Fall 2015

2.1 Curriculum

 

Relevant curriculum development

Develop curriculum for health fields

Develop curriculum for new and emerging degrees

Reassigned Time

  • BTEC Coordinator
  • Curriculum Committee
  • HED Division Faculty

Fall 2014

 

Fall 2016 = AA in place

  1. Remedial/Developmental

 

Address the learning needs of under-performing students

Revise the curriculum  to design and Integrate career success activities

Time

  • BTEC Coordinator
  • Career Success Coordinator
  • Lecturers

Fall 2014-Ongoing

2.6 Faculty & Staff

 

Increase current FTE faculty

Hire FTE Faculty with specialty in distance learning education

Salary Funds

(~$4,167 @ 12 months = $50,004-$55,000 annually)

Administration

Fall 2014

2.7 Facilities

 

Renovate and update computer labs

Renovate BUS 110

Renovate BUS 111

Purchase tables and chairs

Budget Allocation for Facility Improvement

 

$50,000-$60,000

Administration

Fall 2016

3.2 Transfer

 

Add a benchmark for graduates who transfer to four-year institutions

Benchmark added to outcomes

Time

  • BTEC Coordinator
  • Institutional Researcher

Spring 2014

Increase job placement through new curriculum

Develop Medical Office Receptionist Certificate

Develop Virtual Office Assistant Certificate

Time

  • BTEC Coordinator
  • HED Faculty
  • Institutional Researcher
  • UHCC BTEC Partners

Fall  2014

Increase job placement through better coordination with business and industry

Advisory committee input

Survey & Time

BTEC Coordinator and Institutional Researcher

Spring 2015

  1. Faculty/Staff Development

 

Professional development related to increasing and improving design and delivery of distance learning offerings

Develop training for distance learning faculty

Time and Money

 

$5,000

BTEC Coordinator

Spring 2014 - Ongoing

Professional development related to addressing the learning needs of under-performing students

 

Find training for faculty and lecturers

Time and money

(Ed White funds)

 

$5,000

BTEC Coordinator

Summer 2014

  1. Collaboration

 

Establish collaboration with business and industry

Increase partnerships Cooperative Education placement sites

Time

Outreach Counselor &

Program Coordinator

Fall 2015

  1. Diversity

 

Provide support for diversity and cultural awareness

Promote teamwork and collaborative cultural awareness activities in the curriculum

Time

BTEC Coordinator

Fall 2015