University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: University of Hawaii Maui College
Program: Administration of Justice

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The last comprehensive review for this program can be viewed at:
http://maui.hawaii.edu/faculty/program_review/2010/AJProgramReview2010.pdf

Program Description

The Mission of the Administration of Justice Program

The Administration of Justice (AJ) Program is a learner centered program that prepares students to work in the criminal justice system; to meet the pre-service needs of those preparing for careers in law enforcement, private security, or other fields related to administration of justice; and to meet various in-service educational and training needs of professionals in the administration of justice field.  This program strives to create a student focused educational environment that emphasizes high quality teaching and learning.  Like the University of Hawai‘i Maui College, this program serves a diverse student population, many of whom are first generation college students.  We are responsive to the needs of both traditional and non-traditional students whose life experiences and commitment to learning enrich the overall educational environment.

Program Description

The Administration of Justice program is one of three Public Service programs at the College.  Program staff currently includes one full-time faculty and several part-time lecturers.

The AJ program is competency-based and stresses both theoretical and hands on practical application of classroom information.  Upon completion of requisite coursework, students receive a Certificate of Achievement (CA) and/or an Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree.  AJ majors are eligible also to receive as many as six Certificates of Competence in Law Enforcement, Corrections, and Private Security.  After successfully earning 12 credits at UHMC, Police Officers may receive up to 21 AJ credits for completing basic police training as required by government law enforcement agencies. 

Overall Program Purpose

The Administration of Justice program serves the following broad purposes:

  1. To provide general academic knowledge, concepts, and theory pertaining to the criminal justice system.
  2. To meet the pre-service needs of those preparing for careers in law enforcement, corrections, private security or other fields related to administration of justice.
  3. To meet various in service educational and training needs of professionals currently working in the administration of justice.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: AJ     Program CIP: 43.0107

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 184 117 131 Unhealthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 16 11 14
3 *Number of Majors 78.5 80.5 91.5
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 28 29 29
3b     Fall Full-Time 66% 49% 48%
3c     Fall Part-Time 34% 51% 52%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 1% 1% 0%
3e     Spring Full-Time 59% 36% 45%
3f     Spring Part-Time 41% 64% 55%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 1% 0%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 705 504 717
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 312 375 336
6 SSH in All Program Classes 1,017 879 1,053
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 34 29 35
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 12 12 14

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 28.3 24.4 25.1 Cautionary
10 *Fill Rate 91.8% 96.3% 87.7%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 1 1 1
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 78.5 80.5 91.5
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 58.9 60.4 58.8
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 1.3 1.3 1.6
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $76,648 $66,987 $92,544
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $76,648 $63,895 $90,582
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $3,092 $1,962
15 Cost per SSH $75 $76 $88
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 0 1 0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 83% 83% 77% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 11 7 14
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 77.4% 79.4% 72.9%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     45.9%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 12 9 11
20a Degrees Awarded 10 9 7
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 9 9 9
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 9 0 3
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 2 3 3
22a Transfers with credential from program 1 2 1
22b Transfers without credential from program 1 1 2

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 0  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes N/A N/A N/A
25 Fill Rate N/A N/A N/A
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) N/A N/A N/A
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) N/A N/A N/A
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) N/A N/A N/A

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 93.75 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 25.00 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 79.25 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 88.00 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 50.57 Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 33.33 Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     16  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     7
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
38 Number of Pell Recipients     45
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     3
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

1.      Demand -

Occupational Demand          

 

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

Vacancies State

470

161

184

117

131

Vacancies Maui

19

14

16

11

14

 
The data identifies 131 statewide vacancies, 14 of which are on Maui.  This should be considered a conservative estimate specific to law enforcement. The Bureau of Labor Statics Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system identifies employment needs based on specific job titles and classifications.  This data does not accurately reflect industry demand and job vacancies in related areas such as public safety, court support, dispatch, counseling, private security, loss prevention and private investigation.  This program seeks to expose program majors to a broad range of employment possibilities in order to better equip them to work in the industry and find fulfilling careers.
 

Student Demand

Academic Year

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

Declared Majors

32

56

78.5

80.5

91.5

 

For the 2012-2013 academic year, the number of declared majors showed an increase from 81.5 to 91.5.  Effective program coordination and active promotion appear to have a positive effect on program growth.

Student Semester Hours (SSH)

 

F07

F08

F09

F10

F11

F13

SSH Program Majors in Program Classes

87

216

450

705

504

717

SSH Non-Program Majors in Program Classes

180

226

360

312

375

336

SSH All program Classes

267

442

810

1,017

879

1053

 

Student Semester Hours (SSH) for all program classes and program majors increased while SSH for Non-program majors showed a modest decrease from 375 to 336. The increases noted are more than likely attributed to the increase in declared majors and several industry specific classes offered during the academic year.

Academic Year

F08

F09

F10

F11

F12

Full Time Enrollment

15

27

34

29

35

 

Full-Time Enrollment (FTE) in program classes is determined by the total number of student semester hours divided by 30.  According to this calculation (1053/30) the FTE for AY12-13 increased from the previous year. 

 

Academic Year

F08

F09

F10

F11

F12

Classes

9

13

12

12

14

 
There is a demand for an Administration of Justice program at the University of Hawai‘i Maui College.  This is supported by general community interest and feedback from the program advisory committee, industry partners, and students who continue to enroll in this unique and challenging program.  As was reported last year, due to the high major count (91.5) in relation to county positions available (14), the current demand health call for this program remains unhealthy.   Employment data that is narrowly defined does not accurately reflect industry demand and current job vacancies.  Without comparing the Bureau of Labor Statics data against all other sources of employment data, it is difficult to accurately determine demand.
 

2.      Efficiency -

Average Class Size

Academic Year

F08

F09

F10

F11

F12

Registered Students

16.4

20.8

28.3

24.4

25.1

Fill Rate

Academic Year

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

Fill Percent

64%

76%

91.8%

96.3%

87.7%

 

Program marketing, promotion and recruitment continue to be emphasized to support program growth.  Although efforts to monitor student retention and encourage persistence have been beneficial, there are still instances where students choose employment over education.    

FTE of BOR Appointed Program Faculty

Academic Year

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

Full-Time Faculty

1

1

1

1

1

 

One full-time faculty member administers and coordinates this program.  Classes are taught by the program coordinator and supplemented by part time lecturers.  According to current data from spring 2013, the AJ program has a total of 91 declared majors at the University of Hawai‘i Maui College.   EMSI data indicates the current student/faculty ratio is 91.5 to 1.  This unhealthy ratio clearly contributes to the cautionary efficiency health call.    

The only expenses incurred by the AJ program in the last year were personnel related costs for lecturers and the program coordinator.  Additional equipment, teaching materials, visual aids, supplies and services have not been purchased for several years in an attempt to exhaust previously accumulated supplies.  The Social Sciences Department furnishes other required materials to the program resulting in an average cost of $76 per semester hour.

Number of Classes Enrolled under 10

Semester/Year Collected

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

Low Enrolled Class

2

3

0

1

0

 

Upon initial assessment, it would appear that this program is extremely efficient considering the number of student majors, minimal overall cost and a healthy fill rate.  However, the efficiency of the program is identified as cautionary.  Institutional data recognize the ideal student/faculty ratio as 60:1.  The current ratio of 91.5 to 1 is beyond the upper limits of a single person program.  It is clear that this program is making every attempt to work as efficiently as possible however without additional faculty or a 30% reduction in program majors the efficiency health call will continue to be cautionary.

 

3.      Effectiveness

Persistence of Majors from Fall to Spring

Semester/Year Collected

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

Administration of Justice

63%

65%

77.4%

79.4%

72.9

 

Significant efforts to monitor student retention and encourage persistence have continued.  For the first time in five years, data indicates a decline in persistence from fall to spring.  This decline has been attributed to a number of factors including changes in the economy and the growing employment opportunities.

Degrees and Certificates Awarded

Academic Year

2008-9

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

Awards Conferred

0

7

12

9

11

Adjusted Degrees and Certificates Earned

 

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

AAS Degree

2

6

10

9

7

Certificates Earned

AJ Certificate

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Competence/ Achievement

4

9

18

9

9

 

A total of 18 degrees and certificates were awarded following the spring 2013 semester.  Although multiple degrees and certificates were awarded, there were 14 withdrawals which diminished the program’s perceived effectiveness.  In order to minimize student decline, program orientations, faculty advising and student mentoring are being employed throughout the school year.  By working in partnership with the counseling department and campus support services, we hope to reduce student withdraws and become more a more effective program.

 
Perkins Data

Although the overall effectiveness for the Administration of Justice program is rated as Cautionary, the Administration of Justice Program has met or exceeded all but one of the goals set by the Perkins IV Core Indicators.  Indicator 2P1 Completion, is based on students receiving their degree within four semesters.  Coursework in developmental math and English classes, attending UHMC on a part-time basis and outside financial burdens all contribute to a longer academic journey.  Although remedial course taking and part-time status is beyond program control, eligible students are now being advised to apply for certificates as soon as requirements are met.  This will give a clearer understanding of student progress and should impact the 2P1 indicator data.

 
Summary of Program Analysis

The Administration of Justice Program seeks to provide educational opportunities to a diverse community of learners and prepare them for employment in a sensitive area of our community where high-quality education will make a significant difference.   As the job market becomes more competitive, employers are going to become increasingly selective in the quality of potential employees.  Students who receive a quality education will stand out as quality employees.   Fortunately, the demand by security and enforcement related industries has not decreased the current job market in Maui County.

In addition to granting an Associate in Applied Science degree, the program offers several certificates and provides courses for personal and professional job skill development.  We are fortunate that the importance of education is recognized and encouraged by our industry considering that many entry-level jobs do not require any post-secondary school education.  We support an educated workforce and encourage our students to continue their education beyond the associate degree.  This program assists students reach goals of higher education and encourages graduates to continue on to bachelor degree programs within the University of Hawai‘i system.

According to the program data, overall program health remains cautionary in spite of the fact that declared  majors, class fill rates and successful completion numbers are high.  Effective marketing, greater consistency and stability has benefitted this program.  With the effective support of the Program Coordinator, this program will continue to benefit UHMC students, the community and industry partners. 

Other than instructor positions, this program has been able to function without incurring substantial costs for facilities or equipment.  Student advising has become an integral component of this program.  When caught and addressed early, problems in a student’s academic career can be avoided altogether.

The AJ Program is continuing to fulfill its Memorandum of Understanding with the Maui Police Department, enabling police recruits to receive 21 credits for successful completion of the MPD Police Recruit School after earning 12 credits at the College.  The memorandum is currently under evaluation by the AJ program coordinator and MPD’s Plans and Training Division.  This is to ensure that it continues to fulfill the high academic and professional standards of UHMC.

The Maui Police Department, Department of Land and Natural Resources, Maui Community Corrections Center, Transportation Security Administration at Kahului airport and other industry partners have advised strongly that UHMC continue to expand the AJ program.   There is continued interest in working with the College on curriculum development including updating courses and placing more emphasis on additional liberal arts areas such as communication skills, effective note taking and report writing, keyboarding, cultural sensitivity, counseling and foreign language.  These changes will better prepare graduates of this program for the working environment they will enter. 

The AJ Program Advisory Committee is made up of active community members and professionals in criminal justice.  This group’s feedback directly affects the program and their input is critical to the program’s success.  The AJ program’s Student Learning Outcomes and assessment practices are the primary focus of these advisory meetings.  The committee supports the current program SLO’s and gave positive feedback on possible assessment activities that might add greater relevancy to student learning.   

Part III. Action Plan

Goals

Goals are an integral part of a healthy program and are necessary to fulfill the purpose of this program.  For the 2013-2014 academic year, the AJ program has elected to work toward accomplishing the following program goals.

Program Goals for 2012-2013

Part IV. Resource Implications

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No
Demonstrate the use of critical observation skills and decision-making within the legal/ethical parameters of justice professions.

2

No
Assess and respond appropriately to situations containing potential conflicts, hazards and threatening situations.

3

No
Identify the importance of physical and mental fitness, stress management techniques, and maintaining a drug-free lifestyle.

4

Yes
Perform independently and inter-dependently to accomplish shared professional outcomes.

5

Yes
Demonstrate the ability to interact with the public and co-workers in ways that effectively support “justice for all.”

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

On December 4, 2008, the Administration of Justice Community Advisory Board approved and signed the Carl D. Perkins Industry Validation Advisory Committee Approval Form stating that the Board approved the program learning outcomes for the Administration of Justice Program.  The board also reviewed course specific student learning outcomes and assessment activities used to evaluate the program outcomes and found them acceptable for assessing student achievement in meeting industry standards.

The signed validation form is currently on file in the office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at the UHMC campus.

B) Expected Level Achievement

Administration of Justice is often factual, precise, and impartial.  For questions based on these principles, the answers are clearly right or wrong.  However, solutions can often require creativity and complex problem-solving, the answers can also be partially correct or incorrect.  Partial credit is often given if the student shows understanding of the concept, but has made errors due to caution, calculated risk or on ethical grounds. 

Student assessment of program learning is based on the following scale:

Exceeds

Meets

Minimally Meets

Needs Improvement

Insufficient Progress

Grade of A

100-90%

Grade of B

89-80%

Grade of C

79-70%

Grade of D

69-60%

Grade of F

59% and below

Program learning assessment activities, evidence, and results are discussed separately for each course.

C) Courses Assessed

Each semester, one course is selected to be used to assess one of the five program learning outcomes.  In fall 2012, AJ 232 Officer Survival was used to assess PLO #4.  Several embedded questions in exams and an oral demonstration was used to assess student learning. In spring 2013 AJ 190V: Intelligence Analysis and Security Management, was used to assess PLO#5.  Embedded exam questions and group projects were used for this evaluation.

During the 2012/13 academic year, the college wide student learning outcome for written communication was also assessed.  English 106: Report Writing was selected for this assessment since the majority of enrolled student were AJ majors.  Examples of student writing were collected, reviewed and evaluated to determine if students met current industry standards. 

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

AJ 232: Officer Survival

Embedded exam questions and an oral critique were used to assess PLO 4: Perform independently and interdependently to accomplish shared professional outcomes. 

Six assessment items were developed to evaluate this PLO.  Four were embedded questions which required the students to:

  1. Identify the appropriate steps an officer would use when responding to a crime scene.
  2. Explain how to secure and control an area where a possible threat is encountered.
  3. Explain the appropriate justifications for force as outlined in the use of force continuum.
  4. Define awareness spectrum and explain how it is applied to evaluate situational awareness?

Students also analyzed a “use of force” scenario and provided an oral critique of issues that contributed to the outcome of the event.  These scenarios evaluated the student’s ability to identify group dynamics that aggravated or mitigated outcomes in high-stress law enforcement situations.    

Assessment Data for AJ 232 (Fall 2012)

Number of students assessed:  30

Exceed

Meet

Min. Meets

Needs Improve

Insuf. Progress

Total Score

Avg. Score

Competencies

3

2

1

0

n/a

 

 

Initial Response

11

9

5

4

1

56

1.9

Scene Control

10

9

6

2

3

54

1.8

Escalation of force

16

5

5

2

2

63

2.1

Awareness Spectrum

11

8

4

7

0

53

1.8

Scenario Analysis

9

15

1

4

1

58

1.9

Overall Sum

57

46

21

19

 

 

 

Overall Distribution

39.9%

32.2%

14.7%

13.3%

 

 

 

Average Overall Competency Score

 

1.9

 

Analysis of data

According to the data, the average score ranged from 1.8 to 2.1, however the score averaged out over all 5 competencies was 1.5.  All students who showed insufficient progress did so due to missing the exam or failing to appear at the time of an evaluation.   It should be noted that no individual student showed needing improvement or insufficient progress in more than one area. 

72.1% of the 30 students met or exceeded in demonstrating their ability to recognize, assess, and articulate a reasonable response to hypothetical scenarios.  The majority of students were able to identify one or more shared professional outcomes, however, fewer students overall were able to identify and explain what subdued issues might contribute to the outcome of an event. 

It appears that current AJ students have an easier time applying concepts based on a systematic cause and effect format.  The majority of the students were able to master the decision-making process when presented systematically, however, when stress and emotional factors were included, students showed greater hesitation in responding.

 

Course improvement based on analysis

Unlike other program classes that rely on clearly defined concepts and established practices, this course relies heavily on abstract concepts which are presented as a survey with a variety of ethical and safety related options.  When evaluating a dynamic scenario, a higher level of skill is required beyond memorization and defining legal statutes.  Additional homework assignments and a journal project will be assigned to allow more practice and self-reflection around ethical and emotion based decision making.   PLO#4 will is scheduled to be assessed again in fall 2014 while AJ 232 is currently being used to assess PLO#2 this semester.

 

AJ 190V: Intelligence Analysis and Security Management

In spring 2013 AJ 190V: Intelligence Analysis and Security Management, was used to assess PLO#5: Demonstrate the ability to interact with the public and co-workers in ways that effectively support “justice for all.”  

This experimental course is one of three classes being offered to support the Transportation Security Administration’s Homeland Security Associates Program.   This class was offered in two sections, one exclusively to TSA officers and the second section to all other interested students.  Embedded exam questions were used to assess student comprehension in the following areas:

Assessment Data for AJ 190V (Fall 2012)

Number of students assessed:  53

Exceed

Meet

Min. Meets

Needs Improve

Insuf. Progress

Total Score

Avg. Score

Competencies

3

2

1

0

n/a

 

 

Outcome Identification

11

21

15

4

2

90

1.7

Intelligence Gathering Sequence

13

20

9

6

5

88

1.7

Agency Comparison

6

26

11

6

4

81

1.5

Agency Conduct

9

12

20

9

3

71

1.3

Individual Accountability

16

15

12

8

2

90

1.7

Overall Sum

55

94

67

33

 

 

 

Overall Distribution

22.1%

37.8%

26.9%

13.3%

 

 

 

Average Overall Competency Score

 

1.2

 

Throughout the semester, students learn the technical and legal processes by which countries identify, gather, and evaluate intelligence data.  Several ethical and moral problems are explored along with the many legal rules that intelligence gathering agencies must follow. 

As the semester progressed, students were presented with several intelligence gathering scenarios and had to determine if the actions were justified based on current legal and ethical rules.  All students were exposed to similar examples and given an opportunity to research similar cases prior to exams.  Each student’s response was assessed on four criteria: organization of argument, supporting evidence, legal foundation and written content. Students were also required to support their conclusion based on the constitutional definition of “justice for all.” 

 

Analysis of data

Slightly fewer than 60% of the 53 students performed at the proficient or high proficiency level.  They demonstrated the ability to organize a realistic argument and support it with legal evidence.  The remainder of the students had mixed results that spread across the 1, and 0 range.  For those students who only showed some proficiency, most were able to grasp the concepts and form plausible arguments however, their supporting documentation or written content did not meet the required criteria established in the rubric.   13.3% of the students consistently needed improvement to meet the outcomes while a total of 16 students failed to answer one or more of the embedded questions due to absence or withdrawal from the class. 

 

Course improvement based on analysis

The Administration of Justice field is extensive and the program learning outcomes reflects a broad range of objectives.  The greatest challenge faced during this assessment project was designing an assessment tool for student proficiency in a program learning outcome that covers an extremely broad scope.  This coupled with a large classroom population presented additional challenges in this assessment activity.  The results of this activity are promising with a great majority of the students grasping the concepts and demonstrating proficiency in that outcome. 

Although the Program Advisory Committee supports this program learning outcome, realistic assessment is difficult and impractical.  The next Program Advisory Committee meeting is scheduled for December 2013 where this outcome will be re-evaluated for clarity and value.

 

CASLO Assessment of Written Communication for AJ Majors

English 106: Report Writing

Written communication was the college-wide student learning outcome selected for assessment during the 2012/13 academic year.  Based on recommendations from the AJ Community Advisory Committee and the AJ Comprehensive Program Review Committee, a request was made to the English department to offer English 106: Report Writing during the Spring 2012 semester.  The course, taught by Emma White was designed to help students develop report writing skills that were more appropriate for justice related careers.  Examples of student writing were collected, reviewed and evaluated by discipline experts in English and AJ to determine if students met current written communication and industry standards. 

After reviewing the Faculty Report on CASLO Evidence, the correlating course outline, and the Written Communication rubric, was determines that:

E) Results of Program Assessment

Planned Changes due to Assessment Evidence

As a result of assessment evidence collected during the 2012/13 academic year, the following program changes are being made:

Assessment Goals

Current and future assessment activities are intended to directly address all of the current program goals: 

F) Other Comments

Planning and Policy Considerations

The Administration of Justice Program continues to support assessment of program and student learning outcomes with lead to relevance in student learning.  Our student learning outcomes align with program outcomes, industry standards, and the college mission. 

In order to master the learning outcomes, the AJ program continues to emphasize hands-on learning that supports practical problem solving skills.  In this year’s assessment activities about 60% of AJ majors were able to demonstrate that they had met or exceeded the program learning outcomes for the AAS degree.  Although the program has the rigor that the justice professions require, not all AJ majors can master the objectives of the courses.  To address this, course pre-requisites need to be evaluated to insure that they align with current course and program learning outcomes.  Additionally, a process for classifying pre-majors is currently under consideration as a way to encourage students to fulfill core and foundations courses that would support their success in the program.   

Community Engagement and Supporting Best Practices

The Administration of Justice Community Advisory Board meets annually to discuss curriculum, assessment, and explore current trends and practices within the industry.  The 2012 board meeting focused on the new Hawai‘i State Law requiring all private security officers to receive a minimum of 8 hours of training prior to their first work shift.  An AAS degree in AJ is not currently recognized as fulfilling the required training however, the board agrees that an AJ degree should be recognized.  Changes to legal definitions and government policy take time and the board has agreed to continue to work for such changes. The boards next scheduled meeting will take place in December 2013.  

All AJ majors are required to complete at least one industry related internship prior to graduation.  They must also fulfill course requirements in the AJ293V Internship taught by the EdVenture (cooperative education) program.  Through this internship process, employers will continue to recognize the benefits of this program and its students.  As a result of their internship, several program graduates have been able to explore a diversity of careers with the following agencies:

Armored Currier and Transportation Operators

DLNR Resource Enforcement

Department of Public Safety

Federal Park Enforcement

Forestry and Wildlife Technician

Legal Secretary/Paralegal

Legal/Court Clerk

Loss-Prevention Officers

Maui District Court

Maui Drug Court

Maui Police Department

Parole/Probations Officer

Private Investigators

Private Security Guard

Process Server

Security Assessment Specialists

Support Payments Officer

Transportation Security Administration

UH Maui College Security

United States Forestry Division

Every summer, the AJ Program is invited to give a presentation at Maui Police Departments CSI summer camp.  MPD and Officer Anthony Earls coordinate this week long event for Maui county High School Sophomores and Juniors.  As a presenter, the AJ program is able to support Law Enforcement here on Maui and interact with our industry partners.  Though these activities, we can have a positive impact on the future of the justice industry.

The TSA Associates Program was developed by The Department of Homeland Security/TSA to support and encourage higher education and learning among TSA officers.  To support this effort, the AJ Program at UHMC has agreed to offer courses that support completion of the 9 credit certificate.  The first cohort of 22 officers received their certificated on June 4, 2013 and 14 of them have continued their enrollment in UHMC courses toward the completion of an AJ degree. In the meantime, a new cohort of 15 students is currently working toward completing the first the first Associates class.

G) Next Steps

Hands on learning and demonstrations have proven successful for many AJ majors.  In class activities support the learning of complex concepts and provide students the opportunity to apply and reinforce what they are learning.  Student evaluations reflect a positive learning experience through this process and appear more confident in the classroom.  Currently, the AJ program is incorporating Laulima as a communication tool that supports greater transparency between the program, its instructors, and the students.   

Programs Strengths and Challenges

Strengths:

Challenges: