University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: University of Hawaii Maui College
Program: Business Technology

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The last comprehensive review for this program can be viewed at:
http://maui.hawaii.edu/program-review/.

Program Description

The Business Technology Program’s mission is to provide the skills, knowledge and attitudes needed to prepare students for office positions in government and industry. The program provides a state-of-the-art technological curriculum that meets current and emerging Maui County education and computer training needs.  By offering high quality instruction in a motivating learning environment, the program empowers students to achieve their highest potential.  The program strives to recognize and raise awareness of the diverse local and Native Hawaiian traditions that make our community so unique.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: BTEC     Program CIP: 52.0401

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 343 271 271 Cautionary
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 36 28 32
3 *Number of Majors 99 127 142
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 34 54 49
3b     Fall Full-Time 53% 48% 39%
3c     Fall Part-Time 47% 53% 61%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 2% 3% 1%
3e     Spring Full-Time 52% 41% 36%
3f     Spring Part-Time 48% 59% 64%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 1% 4% 2%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 864 848 1,030
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 2,190 2,094 1,468
6 SSH in All Program Classes 3,054 2,942 2,498
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 102 98 83
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 56 53 47

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 19.7 18.9 19.3 Cautionary
10 *Fill Rate 87.4% 81.1% 81.6%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 2 3 1
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 49.5 42.3 142
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 17.4 22.7 29.5
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 5.7 5.6 4.8
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $255,979 $262,642 $285,673
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $255,979 $259,876 $278,210
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $2,766 $7,463
15 Cost per SSH $84 $89 $114
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 4 7 4
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 67% 64% 73% Healthy
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 98 102 67
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 80.7% 77.1% 77.8%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     58%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 30 48 42
20a Degrees Awarded 9 25 12
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 8 18 20
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 28 46 40
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 2 2 7
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 7
22b Transfers without credential from program 2 2 0

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 5 10 5  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes 112 202 100
25 Fill Rate 90% 82% 82%
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 43% 56% 64%
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 20 29 7
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) 78% 69% 79%

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 91.43 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 48.57 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 84.85 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 66.67 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 8.44 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 8.70 Not Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     32  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     11
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
38 Number of Pell Recipients     119
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     7
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

The Demand Indicators remain Cautionary (as was the case in the 2011-2012 program review). The elements used in the health call calculation shows that the number of majors in this program (element 3) has risen 12% and the County prorated new and replacement positions has risen 17% (element 2) since the 2011-2012 program review resulting in a ratio of 4.43.  Last year’s ratio was slightly higher at 4.53. As was indicated in past reviews, the majority of the majors in the BTEC program are majoring in the Medical Assistant II specialty.  The occupational codes for medical assistants are:  CIP 51.0801, SOC 31-9092.00 and are not the codes used as a Quantitative indicator. When a faculty person is hired a high priority item would be to arrange for an analysis using the alternate code.

The Efficiency Indicator has been reduced from Healthy (in the 2011-2012 program review) to Cautionary (in 2013). At the time of this program review, there are no faculty for this program. The program is being held together by lecturers (this program review is being conducted by a lecturer). In Fall 2007 there were 2 – FTE faculty. In December 2011 one faculty person retired. To date, no BTEC faculty has been hired as a replacement. In June 2013, the remaining faculty person retired. To date, no BTEC faculty has been hired. Until a faculty person is hired this indicator will continue to show poorly and most likely will reduce to Unhealthy. Other considerations towards the Efficiency Indicators (Average Class Size, Fill Rate, and Number of Low-Enrolled Classes) has remained steady from the past report.

The Effectiveness indicators continue to show a “healthy” measure for the program. This welcome result is most likely due to counselors who assist in tracking BTEC students on their persistence, credentialing, and retention.

Part III. Action Plan

~~This review was conducted by a lecturer, assuming temporary and partial duties as Program Coordinator until a faculty member is hired into this program or full Program Coordinator duties are assigned to another faculty member from another program. Development of program goals, developing and refining curriculum, student tracking, counseling and recruitment, budgetary items, grant development, participation in the UHMC PCC for BTEC and coordinating outreach activities are beyond the scope of the limited duties agreed upon. Plans for any curriculum changes or improvement on pedagogy are on hold until a faculty member is hired.

Part IV. Resource Implications

No evidence available to do assessment.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

Yes
1. Program graduates select and apply software to create word processing, electronic messaging, desktop publishing, and presentation graphics documents. They meet or exceed productivity standards with the software and in keyboarding speed and accuracy. They understand business document formats and are proficient in proofreading.

2

No
2. Program graduates utilize manual and electronic information management systems. They are able to select, organize and operate systems that meet ARMA (Association of Records Managers and Administrators) standards relative to the record life cycle. Graduates are proficient with database software used to organize, store and retrieve business information using tables, forms, queries and reports.

3

No
3. Program graduates are able to apply interpersonal and leadership skills. They can work as part of a team and participate effectively in culturally diverse groups. They demonstrate professionalism in work quality, appearance, attitude, and workplace behavior.

4

Yes
4. Program graduates are able to understand and use spreadsheet software to meet business information needs. They work confidently with formulas, financial functions, charts, graphs, multi-sheet, and shared workbooks. (applies to all BUSN students with special emphasis for Information Processing Specialty)

5

No
5. Program graduates are able to explain legal terms, concepts, and principles. They can create, format, and edit common legal documents utilizing appropriate business software. They are aware of legal principles and procedures relating to business and financial transactions. (applies only to the Legal specialty)

6

No
6. Program graduates are able to work as nurse aides under the supervision of a registered or practical nurse in a hospital, long-term care, home or clinic setting. They have adequate knowledge of medical terminology, abbreviations, diagnostic tests, drug categories and medications so that they are able to process physician orders effectively. (Applies only to the Medical Assistant Specialty).

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

No content.

B) Expected Level Achievement

  1. Letter grades (percentages) were used for the summary data. A grade of A or B “Exceeds” the requirement for both PLO-1 and PLO-4. A grade of C “Meets” the requirement, a grade of D identifies the student who “Needs Improvement”, and a grade of F qualifies as “Insufficient Progress”. Students who withdrew or were not majoring in Business Technology were not included in the results.

C) Courses Assessed

Two courses were used to assess PLO 1 and one course was used to assess PLO 4. All courses assessed were from the Spring 2013 semester. No courses from the Fall 2012 semester were assessed.
As previously advised from the BTEC Advisory Board, the Legal Specialty was deleted effective Fall 2013.  As reported in the 2011-2012 review, “Members of the advisory board shared how most legal offices prefer to train their employees.  The market for legal office workers is very small.” This PLO should be removed from the program planning grid.

  1. The table below shows the planned PLO’s and the courses which were to be assessed. Notes are provided as explanation.

Assessments This Report

PLO

F12

SP13

Notes

1

R

BUSN123

BUSN 157

BUSN 157 not assessed due to lack of evidence

2

BUSN170-E

BUSN292-E

BUSN292 Not assessed due to lack of evidence

BUSN170 Not assessed due to lack of evidence

3

BUSN193V-E

BUSN292-E

BUSN292 Not assessed due to lack of evidence

4

R

 

BUSN151-E BUSN232-E

BUSN292 Not assessed due to lack of evidence

5

BUSN193V-E

BUSN292-E

Not assessed due to PLO no longer valid – pertained to discontinued legal specialty

6

 

NURS100-E

Not assessed due to lack of evidence

 

The tables below shows the courses in the BTEC program being used for assessment for both the Information Processing and Medical Assistant II specialties, the PLO being applied to that course and at what level each PLO is taught.

Information Processing Map and Weightings

Map of Program Learning Outcomes by Course

 

BUSN
123

BUSN
150

BUSN
151

BUSN
157

BUSN
161

BUSN
166

BUSN
170

BUSN
189

BUSN
193v

BUSN
232

BUSN
237

BUSN
292

PLO 1

3

2

3

3

1

2

1

0

2

1

1

2

PLO 2

0

2

3

0

0

0

3

0

2

0

3

2

PLO 3

1

1

1

1

3

3

2

1

3

1

1

3

PLO 4

0

2

3

0

0

0

0

2

2

3

1

2

 

 

Medical Assistant II Program Map and Weightings

Map of Program Learning Outcomes by Course

 

BUSN
123

BUSN
150

BUSN
151

BUSN
161

BUSN
166

BUSN
170

BUSN
185

BUSN
189

BUSN
193v

NURS
100

NURS
50

PHARM
106

BUSN
292

PLO 1

3

2

3

1

2

1

2

0

2

1

2

1

2

PLO 2

0

2

3

0

0

3

2

0

2

0

1

1

2

PLO 3

1

1

1

3

3

2

2

1

3

3

1

1

3

PLO 4

0

2

3

0

0

0

0

2

2

0

1

1

2

PLO 6

0

0

0

1

1

1

3

2

3

3

2

3

1

The table below shows the remaining semesters of the original five-year cycle assessment plan outlined in the 2010-2011 program review. The courses which were to be assessed plus those to be assessed for the future are listed. Note that PLO 5 (entirely focused on legal documents) will be deleted from the plan in Fall 2013 due to discontinuation of the legal specialty in the BTEC program.

Assessment Plan

PLO

F12

SP13

F13

SP14

F14

SP15

F15

SP16

1

R

BUSN123

BUSN 157

BUSN151-E

BUSN 292-E

R

BUSN292-E

R

BUSN123-E

2

BUSN170-E

BUSN292-E

R

 

 

 

 

BUSN292E

3

BUSN193V-E

BUSN292-E

R

 

 

 

 

BUSN292-E

4

R

 

BUSN151-E BUSN232-E

 

BUSN 292-E

R

BUSN292-E

R

 

5

BUSN193V-E

BUSN292-E

PLO non applicable – pertained only to legal specialty discontinued Fall 2013

6

 

NURS100-E

BUSN185-E

PHRM106-E

BUSN292-E

R

 

 

 

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

  1. Assessments were done by two lecturers teaching the respective courses. Student data (from BTEC students only) was gathered from representative projects, book assignments or exams completed during the semester indicated. One method for PLO-1 focused on both the ability of the student to create and produce original documents emphasizing the typical elements used for business documents and publications. The other assessment method used for PLO-1 concentrated on the ability of the student to produce suitable documents in a reasonable amount of time and were conducted in the classroom under instructor supervision.
    For PLO-4, assessment methods focused on the ability of the students to follow very explicit directions, to work independently and to review all work done for accuracy and completeness while carrying out specific spreadsheet projects in the student textbook. A second method of assessment was used to test the student’s ability to “think beyond the book” by applying the specific formulas, functions, and spreadsheet techniques learned in the book projects to typical business spreadsheet scenarios that the student had not seen previously. Analysis from the second method used results from a supervised in-class timed exam.  All methods employed the submission of electronic documents that were retained as evidence.
  2. Letter grades (percentages) were used for the summary data. A grade of A or B “Exceeds” the requirement for both PLO-1 and PLO-4. A grade of C “Meets” the requirement, a grade of D identifies the student who “Needs Improvement”, and a grade of F qualifies as “Insufficient Progress”. Students who withdrew or were not majoring in Business Technology were not included in the results.

E) Results of Program Assessment

  1. The following tables show each course and PLO assessed. The evidence and discoveries about student learning are presented below each one. It should be noted that many of the PLO assessments that were scheduled for Fall 2012 and Spring 2013 were not completed for this report. This is due to lack of faculty leadership (no faculty in this program at the present time) and poor communication with lecturers regarding the assessment process and their expected role in such review. Compilation of quality assessment data well after the teaching semesters had ended proved difficult and beyond the means of the lecturers who remain with the program.

 

Business Technology Program Assessment Rubric for BUSN157 - PLO 1 – SPRING 2013 - Jost

 

Program Learning Outcomes

*Grade of A or B=Exceeds, C=Meets, D=Needs Improvement, F=Insufficient Progress

*Only Business Technology majors are included in this assessment.

Exceeds

Meets

Needs
Improvement

Insufficient
Progress

PLO 1

Program graduates select and apply software to create word processing, electronic messaging, desktop publishing, and presentation graphics documents. They meet or exceed productivity standards with the software and in keyboarding speed and accuracy.  They understand business document formats and are proficient in proofreading.

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment method 1:  Original business card design, layout and production.
          *Electronic copy of the business card is submitted

15

1

0

0

 

Assessment method 2:  Reproduction of add, timed exercise.
          *Electronic copy of the add is submitted

15

0

0

1

 

Overall Assessment on this PLO.

15

0

0

1

 

Overall Assessment on this PLO - Percentage. (N=16)

94%

0%

0%

6%

 

BUSN 157, Desktop Publishing for Business, has a major focus on the principles of layout, design and use of graphics in business documents created for web and print production. The assessment results show that students are avid learners in this arena with over 94% exceeding the goals for PLO-1 with respect to desktop publishing and graphic design. In addition, all but 1 student was able to perform under a timed situation to substantiate that students are able to work quickly and efficiently with their software.


 

 

 

Business Technology Program Assessment Rubric for BUSN123 - PLO1 – SPRING 2013 - Andrews

 

Program Learning Outcomes

*Grade of A or B=Exceeds, C=Meets, D=Needs Improvement, F=Insufficient Progress

*Only Business Technology majors are included in this assessment.

Exceeds

Meets

Needs
Improvement

Insufficient
Progress

PLO 1

Program graduates select and apply software to create word processing, electronic messaging, desktop publishing, and presentation graphics documents. They meet or exceed productivity standards with the software and in keyboarding speed and accuracy.  They understand business document formats and are proficient in proofreading.

 

 

 

 

Assessment method 1:

Student assessment involving creation of typical documents needed in a business start-up including letters, memos, and tables
*Electronic copy of completed project documents is submitted.

6

1

0

0

Assessment method 2:

Student assessment involving creation of a business report, legal, medical and international documents.
*Electronic copy of completed project document is submitted.

5

2

0

0

Assessment method 3:

Student capstone project involving creation of documents needed for a hypothetical business startup  requiring design and creation of business reports including preface pages, citations, bibliography, index and table with math, design of Letterhead, memo and newsletter templates,  customer data files and templates for letters, envelope and label mail merge .
*Electronic copy of completed project  document is submitted

7

0

0

0

Assessment method 4:

Keyboarding speed and accuracy measured by periodic timed keyboarding tests of 5 minute duration over the course of the semester.
* Scoring based upon calculation of NWAM (net words a minute). NWAM calculated by subtracting two times the number of errors from the GWAM (gross words a minute). Only timed writings with five or fewer errors were counted in the scoring and to qualify for a particular speed grade, students must have achieved that speed at least three times.

*Grade of A or B=Exceeds (>45 NWAM), C= Meets (40-45 NWAM), D=Needs Improvement (35-40 NWAM), F=Insufficient Progress (<35 NWAM)

0

1

2

4

 

Overall Assessment on this PLO

3

3

1

0

 

Overall Assessment on this PLO - Percentage (N=7)

43%

43%

14%

0%

 

PLO 1 also focuses on the ability of Business Technology students to create word processing and electronic messaging documents and includes measures of productivity levels using relevant computer software as well as keyboarding speed and accuracy and the ability to proofread business documents with proficiency. BUSN123 focuses on Advanced Word Processing and assessment results show that overall, 86% of the BTEC students are meeting or exceeding the requirements for PLO-1. With respect to the individual methods of assessment it is clear that students are able to produce advanced word processing documents with great proficiency both under a timed situation (Assessments 1 and 2) and when confronted with creative design (Assessment 3).
 

From these assessments we learned that the BUSN123 class had a significantly lower success rate than the other class assessed for PLO-1. A high percentage (86%) of the students either “needed improvement” or showed “Insufficient Progress” when Assessment 4 is analyzed. The main area of difficulty lies in the keyboarding speed and accuracy. This course has no pre-requisites for typing speed or even to demonstrate the ability to touch type. Yet, the scoring method outlined by the UH Community College articulation agreement for BTEC is heavily favored towards those who enter the class with at least a 35 NWAM skill level (see rubric). This course has a heavy concentration on producing many multi-page documents which necessitates the student’s ability to type quickly and accurately. There is not much time in this course for a beginner typist to advance their speed and accuracy skills to a 40 NWAM goal to “Meet” the C grade without sacrificing learning the complexities of advanced business documents. A faculty member is needed to attend the PCC meetings to continue to refine and update these articulation agreements. Additionally, BUSN121, that teaches touch typing to the beginner, should be made a pre-requisite course. Until this is resolved, overall percentages for "Insufficient Progress" (as in the 14% reported here) will continue to be problematic.


 

 

 

 

Business Technology Program Assessment Rubric for BUSN151 - PLO4 - SPRING 2013 - Andrews

 

Program Learning Outcomes

*Grade of A or B=Exceeds, C=Meets, D=Needs Improvement, F=Insufficient Progress
*Only Business Technology majors are included in this assessment.

 

Exceeds

Meets

Needs
Improvement

Insufficient
Progress

PLO4

Program graduates are able to understand and use spreadsheet software to meet business information needs. They work confidently with formulas, financial functions, charts, graphs, multi-sheet, and shared workbooks. (applies to all BUSN students with special emphasis for Information Processing Specialty)

 

 

 

 

Assessment method 1:

Project from Excel Chapter 4 - Loan amortization schedule with Financial, Logical functions and Data Tables
*Electronic copy of completed project documents submitted.
 

8

0

0

2

Assessment method 2:

Project from Excel Chapter 6 - Multiple Worksheets and Workbooks including 3D formulas, external linking and graphs
*Electronic copy of completed project document submitted.
 

6

2

1

1

Assessment method 3:

Comprehensive Excel Exam - Includes Functions, formulas, charting and manipulation of spreadsheets
*Electronic copy of completed project document submitted.
 

3

1

0

6

 

Overall Assessment on this PLO

4

2

2

2

 

Overall Assessment on this PLO - Percentage. (N=10)

40%

20%

20%

20%

 

PLO-4 concentrates on the ability BTEC students to understand and use spreadsheet software to meet the needs of business. This learning outcome includes the student's ability to work confidently with formulas, financial functions, charts, graphs, multi-sheet and shared workbooks. From the analysis, 60% met or exceeded the goals of PLO-4.

Looking more closely at the four methods used for the analysis, we have learned that students are adept at reading and following book instructions (only 1-2% of the students did not “Meet” the PLO-4 requirements for Assessment methods 1 and 2). Assessment method 3 tests the ability of the student to go beyond step-by-step instructions and apply their learning to spreadsheet tasks similar to, but not an exact replication of the book presentations. Over half of the students were not able to make this transition as evidenced by the 60% result for “Insufficient Progress” for Assessment method 3. Reasons for this result could be a lack of sufficient preparation in spreadsheet skills during the pre-requisite courses, student “fear” of math and/or the lack of critical thinking exercises throughout BTEC courses.

F) Other Comments

  1. Engaged Community:

Recognize and Support Best Practices:

G) Next Steps

  1. Program Plans and Goals
    This review was conducted by a lecturer, assuming temporary and partial duties as Program Coordinator until a faculty member is hired into this program or full Program Coordinator duties are assigned to another faculty member from another program. Development of program goals, developing and refining curriculum, student tracking, counseling and recruitment, budgetary items, grant development, participation in the UHMC PCC for BTEC and coordinating outreach activities are beyond the scope of the limited duties agreed upon. Plans for any curriculum changes or improvement on pedagogy are on hold until a faculty member is hired.