University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: University of Hawaii Maui College
Program: Electronics & Computer Engineer Tech

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The last comprehensive review for this program can be viewed at:
http://maui.hawaii.edu/program-review/
STEM Program

Program Description

Description

The Electronic & Computer Engineering Technology (ECET) program leads to an Associate in Science degree and provides students with the skills and knowledge required for entry level employment within high-technology industry as electronic / electro-optic technicians, renewable energy technicians, telecom technicians, and network system administrators. Students learn fundamental engineering concepts, computer programming, mathematics, and physics relevant to a wide variety of industries on Maui. Training, equipment, and supplies are provided for 3-D printing and circuit board fabrication. Software applications for circuit simulation, CAD, finite element analysis, and microprocessor control are utilized. The program requires written and verbal proficiencies and emphasizes laboratory competencies. Internship and job placement opportunities in a variety of engineering technology positions are provided.

Mission Statement

The mission of the ECET program is to provide students with relevant and rigorous training and education needed for entry-level engineering technology positions in Maui County and to give graduates mobility within the field and the ability to adapt as the field changes.

The ECET program works closely with its high-technology industry advisory board to ensure students gain skills required for employment with local companies. In this respect, the program builds upon skills, duties and tasks considered critical by these prospective employers.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Unhealthy

Majors Included: ECET     Program CIP: 15.1202

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 12 12 11 Unhealthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 1 1 1
3 *Number of Majors 88.5 81 84
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 19 19 18
3b     Fall Full-Time 63% 48% 42%
3c     Fall Part-Time 37% 52% 58%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 0% 0%
3e     Spring Full-Time 43% 32% 42%
3f     Spring Part-Time 57% 68% 58%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 1% 1% 1%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 965 826 841
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 1,770 1,498 1,490
6 SSH in All Program Classes 2,735 2,324 2,331
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 91 77 78
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 41 37 37

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 20.8 19.5 19.6 Cautionary
10 *Fill Rate 99.7% 84.9% 93.3%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 3 3 1
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 29.5 27 84
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 18.2 17.9 18.4
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 4.9 4.5 4.6
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $246,719 $125,431 $87,063
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $246,719 $124,613 $86,992
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $818 $71
15 Cost per SSH $90 $54 $37
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 3 5 5
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 67% 67% 68% Unhealthy
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 52 33 50
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 69% 69.7% 73.8%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     50%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 12 8 12
20a Degrees Awarded 12 8 12
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 9 7 11
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 8 0 2
22a Transfers with credential from program 1 0 0
22b Transfers without credential from program 7 0 2

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 5 5 4  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes 162 151 124
25 Fill Rate 100% 100% 100%
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 70% 70% 68%
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 3 7 5
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) 81% 67% 71%

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 83.33 Not Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 27.78 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 79.63 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 78.57 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 13.10 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 20.00 Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     23  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     6
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     23
38 Number of Pell Recipients     53
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     2
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

1. RESPONSE TO SYSTEM INDICATORS

a. Response to Demand Indicators (Unhealthy)

Statistics and resulting health indicators are based on inaccurate data. This has been reported in previous program reviews. 2013 data remains inaccurate and as a result the unhealthy indicator is inaccurate.

The statistics provided by the UH system do not accurately reflect the number of positions available for ECET graduates. This is due to the system for data collection that will only allow one Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code, 15.1202, for the ECET program. The CIP code points to one Standardized Occupational Classification (SOC) code. There are 9 open positions in the State for this SOC in October 2013. This would indicate that there must be more than 11 positions per year for this SOC. In addition, the ECET AS degree program prepares students for more than the one SOC allowed by the data collection methodology. The tables below summarize the overall long term employment projections available for AS graduates of the ECET program in Hawai`i (Table 1) and in Maui county (Table 2). Table 2 shows that there has to be more than one position in Maui county for AS ECET graduates.

 

 Table 1. Long term occupational projections, Hawai`i State, 2010-2020

 

Table 2. Long term occupational projections, Maui County, 2010-2020

1Job Openings refers to the average annual job openings due to growth and net replacement.

 

 

Source: Hawaii Department of Labor, http://www.hiwi.org/gsipub/index.asp?docid=423

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ECET program statistics for the number of majors provided to the program from the UH System include students who have declared ECET as their major, yet never attended any classes in the major. The UH system records 84 ECET majors for the 2012-2013 academic year. There were 67 active students in fall 2012 and 46 active students in spring 2013 that were enrolled in classes as part of the ECET program.

There were 10 Native Hawaiian students that were actively enrolled in ECET classes.

There were 19 ECET classes taught in fall 2012 – spring 2013, including specialized Math and Physics classes required by the program. The SSH and FTE statistics reported are inaccurate because the number of classes is reported incorrectly.

b. Response to Efficiency Indicators (Cautionary)

The efficiency indicators are based on inaccurate FTE and inaccurate number of active students.

c. Response to Effectiveness Indicators (Unhealthy)

The effectiveness indicators are based on inaccurate data.

Number of AS ECET graduates 2005-2013

 

Year

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012(1)

2013

# of graduates

5

2

4

11

4

5

12

11

9

(1)2012 number of graduates includes students who graduated in summer 2012

The number of majors (#3), the new and replacement positions (county prorated) (#2), and the unduplicated degrees (#20) do not reflect the actual numbers. As a result, the effectiveness scores based on those numbers are biased, as well as the overall category health score.

 

2. PROGRAM'S STENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES

a. Strengths

 

b. Weaknesses

 

c. Analysis

Students require better math skills in order to succeed. Math pre-requirements have been strengthened.

A Perkins carryover grant was awarded for the 2012-2013 academic year to help students overcome their weaknesses in mathematics. It included a tutoring program in fall 2012 and spring 2013, and a summer bridge program in summer 2013. 71% of the students who participated remained or enrolled in the program the following year (fall 2013). The grant was not extended for the 2012-2013 academic year. The program will continue to try to find extramural funds to provide the students with the help they need to succeed.

ECET persistence rate and the tutoring program

Tutoring semester

Fall 12

Spring 13

Summer 13

Overall (no duplicates)

Students signing for tutoring

3

9

9

17

In the program in fall 13

2

7

6

12

Percent success

67%

78%

67%

71%

 

Continue implementing academic plans for each student starting the program.

 

Students that have completed Math 82 or students enrolled in Math 82 during the first semester of the ECET program have a 90% graduation rate. Faculty will continue to revise the curriculum and the program map to better prepare the students.

 

Part III. Action Plan

~~Curriculum change: A modification of the ECET AS degree curriculum and program map was submitted and approved by UHMC's Curriculum Committee and Academic Senate in spring 2013. It is designed to strengthen the program and allows ECET majors to graduate in two years instead of three. Students who enter the ECET program with the proper prerequisites and wish to pursue with the ENGT program will be able to graduate with the baccalaureate degree in four years.

 

·Persistence rate: A Perkins Carryover proposal was awarded for the academic year 2012-2103, which included a tutoring program to help ECET students overcome their weaknesses in mathematics. Persistence rates for freshmen increased by 8% after one semester into the program, and 13% after one year into the program.

 

·Equipment in the electronics lab: The program used its last extramural funds to purchase more equipment and replace obsolete equipment. Laboratory experiments with up-to-date equipment are an essential component of the learning process and indispensable for acquiring the skills students will need when entering the workforce.

 

2. Action plans and goals

 

·Curriculum: Continue adjusting the curriculum to better prepare the students, especially in mathematics.

·Written communication: Work with English faculty to develop and implement technical writing workshops for ECET majors..

 

·Student academic plans: Continue the monitoring program, which helps students stay on track, allowing them to graduate in a timely manner.

·Equipment: The program weakness is mainly in lack of financial support from the campus. Funding from UHMC's Tech Fee ($4,087 for software during the academic year 2012-2013) cannot cover all the expenses. The program requires  funding in order to meet the needs of the high tech industry. This is now a major factor of concern as current extramural funding have expired.

The ECET program is a three-year program that leads to the Associate in Science (AS) degree. AS graduates can pursue their education and enroll in the two-year Engineering Technology program which leads to the Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) degree. Currently, it takes five years to graduate with the BAS.

In order to align with the college goal (which is to offer four-year degree programs), changes to the ECET curriculum and program map have been submitted and approved by Curriculum Committee and the Academic Senate in spring 2013. The new program map will start in fall 2014. ECET majors will be able to graduate with the AS degree in two years.

Part IV. Resource Implications

The program is currently without any operating budget support from the college general fund. All purchases (materials, supplies and software licenses) as well as the student programs coordinator position and the student lab technician position have been made possible thanks to extramural funding:  $110,00 this year from an NSF grant and $70,000 this year from the Department of  Labor. Extramural funding for program support expired in September 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No
1. Analyze, design, and implement electro-optic systems, control systems, instrumentation systems, communication systems, computer systems, or power systems.

2

No
2. Apply project management techniques to electrical/electronic(s) and computer systems.

3

No
3. Utilize appropriate mathematics at the level of algebra and trigonometry to solve technical problems.

4

Yes
4. Demonstrate critical engineering technology skills and experiences such as: making existing technology operate, creating/selecting new technology, troubleshooting, calibrating, characterizing, and optimizing.

5

Yes
5. Demonstrate engineer's way of thinking, analyzing technology as systems.

6

Yes
6. Demonstrate engineer professional skills such as communication and managing projects.

7

No
7. Demonstrate proficiency in the general education college core requirements: creativity, critical thinking, oral and written communication, information retrieval, quantitative reasoning.

8

Yes
8. Demonstrate a respect for diversity and knowledge of contemporary professional, societal and global issues.

9

Yes
9. Commit to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

No content.

B) Expected Level Achievement

Expected level of achievement

Expectation

Exceeds

Meets

Needs Improvement

Insufficient Progress

Letter grade

A-B

C

D

F

Percentage

80% ≥

70% ≥

60% ≥

 ≤59%

C) Courses Assessed

PLO 4. Demonstrate critical engineering technology skills and experiences such as: making existing technology operate, creating/selecting new technology, troubleshooting, calibrating, characterizing, and optimizing.

PLO 5: demonstrate engineer's way of thinking, analyzing technology as systems.

PLO 6: demonstrate engineer’s professional skills such as communication and managing projects.

PLO 8: demonstrate a respect for diversity and knowledge of contemporary professional, societal and global issues.

PLO 9: commit to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.

 

 

ETRO 101: Introduction to Electronic Technology

ETRO 112: Electronic Technology II

ETRO 293v: Internship II

ETRO 298: Special Projects in Electronic Technology

 

 

The assessment is based upon the following keys:

I: the PLO is introduced in the course

R: The PLO is reinforced in the course

E: the PLO is evaluated in the course   

Table below shows an updated assessment plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

- Tools used to assess PLO #4 in ETRO 101 :

* Homework assignments: The assigned problems dealt with theoretical and applicable concepts      and were picked from the text book.

 * Laboratory activities: The laboratory activities covered topics that were discussed in class.

* Tests The tests covered topics that were discussed in class.

 

- Tools used to assess PLO #5 in ETRO 112 :

* Homework assignments

* Two required tests

* Laboratories/Projects

 

- Tools used to assess PLO #6 in ETRO 298:

* Oral presentation

* Demonstration

* Written report

                                              

- Tools used to assess PLO #8 & 9 in ETRO 293v:

* Interviews.

E) Results of Program Assessment

ETRO 101 has 27% of students with insufficient progress. This is mainly due to a lack of math preparation. Students without math skills cannot calculate or predict proper and/or optimal operation of devices. Following is an analysis of student math preparation in ETRO 101.

ECET persistence rate:

Table 1 shows the persistence rate over the years for ECET students starting the program  in fall 2008, spring 2009, etc...

For example, 53% of the students who started the ECET program in spring 2009 (spring 2009 students) enroll in the second semester (year 1, 2nd semester) and 47% of the students that started in spring 2009 enroll in the third and remaining semesters.

Conclusion: Students either quit the ECET program within the first two semesters or complete the program. (As with many programs in the country, the period of highest attrition is within the first year.)

MATH 107 (Math for Electronics and Computers) is required for graduation and is offered in the spring. Students can take MATH 107 in the second semester of the program if they have the prerequisite (MATH 82: Accelerated Algebraic Foundations).

Table 2 shows the status in math for students starting the ECET program in fall 2010, and the corresponding persistence rate. We chose this particular year because there were  twice the normal number of first semester students. Table 2 shows that students who start the program with strong mathematics skills stay in the program, whereas students who are weak tend to quit the program early on. For example, after two semesters, only one student who started placed at MATH 18 was still enrolled in the program.

Conclusion: There is definitely a need to better prepare the students who enroll in the program by offering them support in mathematics.

Not all students enroll in a math class the first semester into the ECET program. However, those who do so the first semester are more likely to stay in the program. Table 3 lists the math course placement and enrollment status for students starting the program in fall 2010. For first semester students that placed at MATH 82, 93% stayed in the program if enrolled in MATH 82, whereas 40 % only of those who did not enroll in MATH 82  remained in the program. The same trend is true with MATH 18.

Conclusion: There is a need to have more students enrolled in mathematics as soon as (or even before) they start the program.

b) This problem aligns with the following Perkins Core Indicators:

and with the following UHCC Strategic Plan Goals:

c) In order to improve persistence in the ECET program) it is essential to focus efforts on improving student math skills and provide the appropriate support as soon as possible.

 

Table 1. ECET persistence rate

Starting

Year

1

2

3

Year

Semester

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

fall 08

 

100%

64%

46%

39%

32%

29%

spring  09

 

100%

53%

47%

47%

47%

37%

fall 09

 

100%

53%

53%

47%

42%

42%

fall 10

 

100%

71%

55%

52%

   

fall 11

 

100%

57%

52%

     

Table 2. Math level and corresponding persistence rate. (Fall 2010students.)

Math status when enrolling in ECET

Have MATH 107 or higher

Place at MATH 82**

Place at MATH18*

 
 

Number of students

11

24

6

 

Percentage

27%

59%

15%

 

Number of students still in the program after

1 semester

2 semesters

1 semester

2 semesters

1 semester

2 semesters

 

10

10

17

12

3

1

 

Persistence rate

91%

91%

71%

50%

50%

17%

 

*Math 18: Essential Math for Algebra

**Math 82: Accelerated Algebra

Table 3. Enrollment in Math courses the first semester. (Fall 2010 students.)

Place at MATH 82: 24

Place at MATH 18: 6

Enroll in fall 10

Do not enroll

Enroll in fall 10

Do not enroll

14

10

3

3

Continue

Quit

Continue

Quit

Continue

Quit

Continue

Quit

13

1 (F)

4

6

2

1(F)

1

2

93%

 

40%

 

67%

 

33%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4. Math status for students starting the ECET program in fall 2012

Math status when enrolling in ECET

Have MATH 107

Place at MATH 107 or higher

Place at MATH 82

Place at MATH 18

Unknown*

 
 

Number of students

2

18

16

6

2

 

Percentage

5%

41%

36%

14%

5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*No compass test score available

Table 5. Fall 2012 enrollment in math courses for students starting the program in fall 2012

Place at MATH 82: 16

Place at  MATH 18: 6

Enroll in fall 12

Do not enroll

Enroll in fall 12

Do not enroll

12

4

1

5

 
ETRO 112 assessment shows that later in the program students are successful and have learned to analyze systems, and think as engineers.
 
ETRO 298 assessment shows that students need improvement in written and verbal communication. Projects are successfully completed and technology utilized to produce systems. However, the results of the projects are not clearly communicated in a professional manner.
 
ETRO 293 assessment indicates that students are exceeding with regards aspects of quality and timeliness. 
 

ETRO 298 is a project class required in the last semester of the AS degree. ETRO 298 assessment indentifies that students are well prepared in technical aspects. Students are exceeding in the demonstration category. The projects are finalized and functional. The projects meet either initial or modified specification. The presentation category and report category for ETRO 298 indicate that students need better preparation and training in written and verbal communication. The ECET program map recommends all students to have completed English 100 in the second semester of study. English faculty informs that students needing improvement may delay completion of English 100. Prerequisite classes for ETRO 298 will be reviewed in ensure that students may not enroll in ETRO 298 until successful completion of English 100. Several additional strategies for ECET program improvement have been indentified by ECET and English faculty and will be implemented starting in fall 2013. Students in the semester prior to ETRO 298 will be informed that both ECET and other faculty will review technical writing assignments. A pilot of this approach shows that just the “threat” of faculty from other departments reviewing technical writing assignments improves performance. As one student remarked, “We feel like we need to dress in our suits now”. We believe that since the focus of the program and class is on technology the students put less emphasis on the writing itself. Knowing that writing will be evaluated in addition to technical content raises the level of the student reports. A second strategy will be to work together with English faculty and The Learning Center (TLC) to develop a technical writing workshop. One lab class period will be dedicated to this workshop where students will build on English 100 writing skills by focusing on technical writing. A laboratory project will be assigned to this workshop, so students will have a specific goal and outcome. Students identified as requiring improvement in freshman semester classes will be escorted to TLC where they will receive individualized assistance. In their final semester project, ETRO 298 students will be required to review technical writing at TLC prior to the final report submission. This will emphasize the writing requirement for the student and provide time for improvement and editing as required. Faculty continues to try and find solutions that will improve student performance in verbal and written communication. A similar approach will be reviewed with faculty regarding verbal performance and assessment of verbal communication skills for ETRO 298.

 

 

 

F) Other Comments

Engaged Community

High School visits, AY 2012-2013

High School

High School attendees

Maui High School

26

Baldwin High School

39

King Kekaulike High School

4

Venues, AY 2012-2013

Venue AY 2012-2013

Location

College Transfer Fair

UHMC

Maui County Fair

Kahului

Engineering Innovative Day

UHMC

AMOS Conference (1)

Wailea

                                 (1): Advanced Maui Optical and Space Surveillance Technologies Conference

Activities

# ECET/ENGT students

Task

First Lego League Tournament

5

Referees

Advisory Board input

In September 2012 the advisory board reviewed the program goals, classes, map, and curriculum. The advisory board supported a proposal for a curriculum change that would offer the ECET AS in two years instead of three.

Recognize and Support Best Practices

ECET students are offered the means to acquire the knowledge and technical skills that lead to entry into the technology fields. Hands-on lab activities (which are the foundation of the courses) include extensive use of equipment and software platforms that are as close as possible to what the students will encounter in the workplace.

However, without funding to replace obsolete equipment and purchase new innovative software, it will be difficult to adequately prepare ECET graduates for the workplace.

 

 

G) Next Steps

1. Results of goals and changes from last year's program review
 
·Curriculum change: A modification of the ECET AS degree curriculum and program map was submitted and approved by UHMC's Curriculum Committee and Academic Senate in spring 2013. It is designed to strengthen the program and allows ECET majors to graduate in two years instead of three. Students who enter the ECET program with the proper prerequisites and wish to pursue with the ENGT program will be able to graduate with the baccalaureate degree in four years.
 
·Persistence rate: A Perkins Carryover proposal was awarded for the academic year 2012-2103, which included a tutoring program to help ECET students overcome their weaknesses in mathematics. Persistence rates for freshmen increased by 8% after one semester into the program, and 13% after one year into the program.
 
·Equipment in the electronics lab: The program used its last extramural funds to purchase more equipment and replace obsolete equipment. Laboratory experiments with up-to-date equipment are an essential component of the learning process and indispensable for acquiring the skills students will need when entering the workforce.
 
2. Action plans and goals
 
·Curriculum: Continue adjusting the curriculum to better prepare the students, especially in mathematics.
·Written communication: Work with English faculty to develop and implement technical writing workshops for ECET majors..
 
·Student academic plans: Continue the monitoring program, which helps students stay on track, allowing them to graduate in a timely manner.

·Equipment: The program weakness is mainly in lack of financial support from the campus. Funding from UHMC's Tech Fee ($4,087 for software during the academic year 2012-2013) cannot cover all the expenses. The program requires  funding in order to meet the needs of the high tech industry. This is now a major factor of concern as current extramural funding have expired.

The ECET program is a three-year program that leads to the Associate in Science (AS) degree. AS graduates can pursue their education and enroll in the two-year Engineering Technology program which leads to the Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) degree. Currently, it takes five years to graduate with the BAS.

In order to align with the college goal (which is to offer four-year degree programs), changes to the ECET curriculum and program map have been submitted and approved by Curriculum Committee and the Academic Senate in spring 2013. The new program map will start in fall 2014. ECET majors will be able to graduate with the AS degree in two years.