University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: University of Hawaii Maui College
Program: Early Childhood Education

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2012, and can be viewed at:
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/arpd/instructional.php?action=analysis&college=MAU&year=2012&program=154

Program Description

Early Childhood Education (ECED) program description:

 

The curriculum is organized around a core of courses that provide skills and knowledge needed by early childhood educators. Students earn an Associate in Science (AS) degree in Early Childhood Education that articulates into the UH West Oahu’s Bachelor’s in Social Science degree, Early Childhood Education concentration.

 

UH Community College’s Early Childhood Education (ECED) program mission:

 

UHMC’s Early Childhood Education program mission:

Conceptual Framework – a document that describes the program

Approved October 2012 by Early Childhood Education Advisory Committee

 

UHMC’s Early Childhood Education Associate Degree program prepares students to work effectively with young children and their families.  Ten courses in the program are prerequisites for the UH West O’ahu online Bachelor in Social Science, ECE concentration degree. 

Maui College’s ECE program reaches the Tri-Isle Maui County through the UHMC Education Centers in Hana, Lahaina, Lana'i, and Moloka'i, and through closed-circuit TV, online, hybrid, and face-to-face courses.  Course offerings and modalities are planned two years ahead, in order to facilitate students’ academic planning.   The program prepares students to work in various early childhood education settings - infant-toddler/Early Head Start/preschools/Head Start, family child care, and family-child interaction learning programs.  Home visitors can also gain knowledge and application of child development through courses offered. 

Our program philosophy about learning drives our approach to teaching.

Community connections.  Faculty also build strong relationships with the early childhood education community through its advisory committee and participation in local, state, and national committees.  Faculty are constantly refining and updating their knowledge base through membership and participation in professional organizations.  The program works closely with the early childhood community to continually identify gaps in services and works to fill those gaps.  UHMC ECE program is known for its ability to build strong partnerships with a variety of organizations.  Partnerships and the program coursework aim to build on the strength and abilities of the many competent, dedicated people in the local community. 

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: ECED     Program CIP: 13..1210

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 321 105 103 Unhealthy
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 20 9 6
3 *Number of Majors 20 66 71
3a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian 10 34 36
3b     Fall Full-Time 0% 21% 28%
3c     Fall Part-Time 0% 79% 72%
3d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 0% 2% 4%
3e     Spring Full-Time 35% 21% 21%
3f     Spring Part-Time 65% 79% 79%
3g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System 3% 3% 4%
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 160 338 409
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 828 490 428
6 SSH in All Program Classes 988 828 837
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 33 28 28
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 17 16 16

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
9 Average Class Size 18.9 17 17.1 Healthy
10 *Fill Rate 81.9% 72.9% 77.3%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 0 2
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 0 35.5
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 11.5 37.1 39.9
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 1.7 1.8 1.8
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation $153,586 $180,547 $157,626
14a General Funded Budget Allocation $153,586 $179,876 $156,804
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation $0 $0 $0
14c Tuition and Fees $0 $671 $822
15 Cost per SSH $155 $218 $188
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 4 5 4
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 76% 70% 78% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 12 29 18
19 *Persistence Fall to Spring 0% 70.9% 70.8%
19a Persistence Fall to Fall     36.1%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 9 10 17
20a Degrees Awarded 1 4 8
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 1 4 3
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 8 5 13
21 External Licensing Exams Passed   Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 0 2 2
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 1
22b Transfers without credential from program 0 2 1

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 1 0 1  
24 Enrollments Distance Education Classes 26 N/A 19
25 Fill Rate 100% N/A 79%
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 69% N/A 58%
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 2 N/A 7
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) No Fall Courses N/A No Fall Courses

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.00 88.24 Not Met  
30 2P1 Completion 50.00 23.53 Not Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 74.25 65.79 Not Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 60.00 80.00 Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation 17.00 1.56 Not Met
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion 15.25 0.00 Not Met

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
35 Number of Degrees and Certificates     11  
36 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     7
37 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
38 Number of Pell Recipients     48
39 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     2
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Response to Demand indicator:  Unhealthy

The unhealthy call comes from the number of majors (71) and the low number of County pro-rated new and replacement positions (6).

In 2014, with the change in Kindergarten entry (from Dec. 31 to July 31) and increased amount of subsidies to families available for children born August 1 – December 31, 2009, an uptick in the number of new and replacement positions is anticipated.  There may also be an increase in retirements of some long-time directors of early childhood programs in Maui in the next few years. 

Strengths and weaknesses

The number of majors is a strength of the program.  The program separated from Human Services in 2010, and in 2010 there were 20 majors, and now there are 71 – a 355% increase. 

72-79% of majors are part-time, and class scheduling is a strength that reflects this student population.  The majority of classes are offered in the evening or late afternoon.  At least one day class is offered per semester, and many non-majors choose the daytime class. Class scheduling allows majors to access classes and non-majors to gain child development knowledge that can help in other careers and in parenting. Every semester one Skybridge (interactive TV between Kahului, Hana, Lahaina, Moloka'i, Lana'i) is offered.  Online and hybrid classes are scheduled in between years with face-to-face classes. 

The number of positions available for employment is not in the program’s control.  However, program coordinator tracks the job openings and receives calls from programs when they are looking for staff. 

Response to Efficiency indicator:  Healthy

For the first time since 2010, the number of faculty is now accurate – it was showing as “0” and two is the accurate count.

 

Strengths and weaknesses

The program faculty are a strength:  they network closely with the local and state early childhood community through the advisory committee, MEO Governing Board, Good Beginnings Community Council, Kaulanakilohana (ECE higher education faculty), Hawai’i Association for the Education of Young Children, Maui Director’s group, Hawai’i Careers with Young Children.  Both faculty also provide leadership on campus in various capacities. 

Program lecturers are also a strength:  lecturers provide students with variety of teaching styles while keeping course and program expectations high. 

Number of low-enrolled classes is a challenge.  Three are intentionally low – these are the practicum courses that are limited by space and time constraints.  The other challenge is 200 level curriculum courses that are essential for students to graduate.  Introductory classes are full of students who are trying out ECE, and the degree-seeking majors are the ones who need the 200 level ED courses.  Offering the curriculum courses every year allows students the ability to graduate in a timely manner, and also results in low numbers for those courses.  At this point, to align with graduation initiatives, the curriculum classes will continue to be offered each year.  Full-time faculty teach the classes. 

Response to Effectiveness indicator:  Cautionary

Since successful completion increased 8%, # of withdrawals was 11 fewer (38%), unduplicated degrees and certificates was up by 7 (70%), and transfers remained the same, it’s unclear why the call is cautionary.  Program coordinator knows of at least 3 students who transferred to UHWO, so the data point of “2” transfers is in question. 

Strengths and weaknesses

Tracking and counseling of program majors is a strength.  Program coordinator invites all majors to meet and create an education plan with projected graduation dates.  Students come in periodically to update their plan.  Creating a plan assures students space in required practicum courses. 

Analysis of retention, persistence, graduation rates

Retention (stayed in class and completed with C or higher):

Retention rate increased to 78% from 70% previous year.  Faculty and lecturers make concerted efforts to encourage students to withdraw within the “withdraw period” if it becomes clear that they are not going to succeed in the course (usually determined by low attendance and no or minimal work turned in).  This is to the student’s advantage, as they have a W instead of an F on their transcript.  Current practice will continue as it benefits students in the long run.

Persistence (Fall to Spring, Fall to Fall)

Fall to Spring persistence dropped by .1% - currently 70.8%, was 70.9%.  Many majors are “trying out” ECE and some find that the complexity and rigor of the classes is not what they expected, and they may stop school or change to a different major. Some students only need four classes to reach their goal, and that may not be captured in a meaningful way in this data set.  The current discussions on campus regarding “pre-majors” and creating a requirement for majors will use this data. 

Fall to fall persistence is a new measure, and 36.1% is the new baseline.  This will also be a useful data point for the “pre-major” discussion.

Graduation rates

There was a 70% increase in unduplicated degrees/certificates awarded.  This is due to program coordinator tracking students, filling out and turning in forms for certificates for students.  While “advanced professional certificates awarded” is 0 for the program, there is a Certificate of Completion Early Childhood Option that is granted to students with a Bachelor’s degree or higher in another field who take 12 credits of early childhood courses – so this could be considered a form of “advanced professional certificate”.  The DHS CANOES Registry that tracks professionals in ECE has been informed that the certificate shows that the candidate has met the education requirements for being a preschool teacher. 

New curriculum action for 2014 is changing the current Certificate of Achievement to a set of courses that is useful in the UH system.  The certificate will show that the student meets the ECE course prerequisites for UH West O'ahu along with ENG 100 and MATH 103. 

Part III. Action Plan

2012 goal

Status Oct. 2013

Plan key assignments that align with NAEYC standards and supportive skills in preparation for ECADA.

Done

Improve pedagogy to assure meeting Perkins 1P1, 2P2, 4P1 goals.

1P1 (Tech skills attainment): not met this year.

2P2: not included in this year’s data

4P1 (student placement): Met

Change course alphas to ECED

In process Fall 2013 for implementation Fall 2014.Honolulu and Hawai’i also changing alphas

Apply for ECADA Fall 2014 for Spring 2015 visit – need 2 years of data

On track

 

We have created a process that nests the PLOs into the NAEYC accreditation process.

Involving the Advisory Committee in the CASLO process was very successful. The example of a student on the Advisory Committee has been shared as a practice to consider for all advisory committees.The committee feedback was very positive – they felt valued and honored to be part of the assessment process.

Part IV. Resource Implications

Estimated cost of NAEYC ECADA accreditation:  $5000-$6000 for peer review visit (Application Fall 2014, peer review visit Spring 2015), annual fee of $1530.

Cost of UHMC Head Start accreditation: $1425.  Annual fees required after accreditation:  $300. 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No
Use knowledge of child development and of individual children to create healthy, challenging learning environments and experiences.

2

Yes
Build respectful partnerships with children, families, and their communities.

3

No
Observe, document, and assess children's development and learning in partnership with families.

4

No
Build positive relationships and guide children through supportive interactions.

5

No
Plan, implement, and assess learning experiences using appropriate content, concepts, and methods.

6

No
Base decisions and actions on ethical and other professional standards.

7

No
. Advocate for children and families within the program.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

The Early Childhood Education Advisory Committee met on April 8, 2013.  Here are the notes from the meeting: 

Early Childhood Education Advisory Committee

Notes

April 8, 2013

1-3 p.m.

Ka Lama 102

 

  1. Present: Debbi Amaral (MEO), Kaina Bonacorsi (Maui County), Bobbi-Jo Moniz-Tadeo (Imua Family Services), Dawna Krueger (Iao Preschool), Christine Taylor (Nanny Connection), Charmane Yamada (UHMC student), Poni Medeiros (Kamehameha Preschools Maui), Ailina Laborte (PATCH)

ECE faculty: Julie Powers, Elaine Yamashita

UHMC: Vice-Chancellor Academic Affairs John McKee, Kulamanu Ishihara (counselor), Lisa Deneen (counselor and CASLO committee rep), Eric Engh (CASLO chair, English faculty), Laura Nagle (English)

  1. Community updates (action items in bold)
    1. Iao Preschool – Dawna retiring – new director search committee has been formed.
    2. Nanny Connection – Busy at Kea Lani right now. 
    3. Early Head Start – Had triannual monitoring (federal review) early this year.  Successful completion with no defiencies.  Got grant through DOH to expand EHS home visiting.
    4. Charmane Yamada – working at Holy Innocents Preschool.
    5. Bobbi-Jo – Imua Family Services – 251 0-3 year olds serviced.  April 24 hearing, 1-4 pm, @ MEO classroom for change of eligibility criteria for 0-3.  Asking for support to testify against the change. 
    6. Maui County – budget hearings coming up.  Dept. of Housing and Human Concerns – April 23, 24. Not anticipating many changes, hopefully slightly increased level of funding. 

In state legislature there are ECE bills – 3 major ones from Executive Office of Early Learning.  Funding for school readiness, constitutional amendment (if passed, question would be on November ballot, would need to pass the voters), ECE program.  Rally scheduled for Thursday at state capitol.  Info available on Office website.  Concerns about rural areas being served, capacity and staff that meet qualifications.  DHS put in additional request for more child care assistance.  If funds are received, will revise 10-tier to 6-tier reimbursement. 

ECE wellness guidelines in process.

Hawai’i Careers with Young Children – entity is in transition, restructuring.  CANOES website still up. 

Family child care providers in Maui county – on ag zoned land – potential problem with licensing.  May not be exempt from conducting business on the land.  Year and half to two years process for zoning exemption at a $1500 cost.  120 children would be affected.  Impetus was complaint against a FCC on ag land.  If they are on state ag land – would be DHS rule change.  PATCH working w/DHS, Ka’ina’s office on it.  Not all FCC affected know about this.

  1. Head Start – Federal review in January – CLASS observations were used.  New Head Start rules – low-performing centers have to enter re-competition.  Working to take CLASS scores out of re-designation list – should be tool for improvement.  Fade out study implications have been in the news.  Talked to Rep. Souki – pointed out that K-3 practices may be responsible for fade out. 

MEO Head Start had deficit of $154,000.  Reduced enrollment for first time – 278 (from 298), Sequestration effect was $104,000 additional deficit.  Looking at grantwriting, other ways to fund raise.  Lihikai PrePlus will be closing after this school year.

  1. PATCH – need new providers. Down to 88 – high of 92.  New Montessori program in Lahaina opened, also new program in Ha’iku. 

E-learning – doing classes online.  $25/class – 3 hours.  Not funded by DHS.

Children of Rainbow looking for new director. 

Kahului Union Preschool looking for new teacher.      

  1. Kamehameha – Hana waiting for assessor.  A’apueo site starting accreditation process – getting doors from bathroom into classroom.  Moloka'i – full day pilot – 7:30-3:30.  3 positions available.  Poni is now CLASS reliable.  Her title is now Educational Coordinator.   

 

3.  Update on NAEYC Early Childhood Associate Degree Accreditation (ECADA)

 

4.  Program updates:

Katherine Larsen,  Isadora (May) Sicking

Charmane Yamada 

 

 

 

5.  College-wide Academic  Student Learning Outcomes: assessment on Written Communication

Encourage ENG 100 early on – also SP 151.

What kind of writing do teachers/teacher assistants do?  Documenting observations, any letters to families goes through lead teacher or director first.  Summary reports to families in Work Sampling are required.  Certain format required – where child is developmentally, goal(s) to work towards.  Describing, analyzing behavior in concise manner.  Could be part of coursework here.  Able to look at variety of objective observations, format that is required, analyze the information and present in concise, clear, understandable manner.  Evaluate and analyze information, with positive tone, objective manner. 

 

ED 275 – look at changing prereqs – ENG 100 or 210?  Students have issues with paraphrasing, citations.  APA citation style used. 

MLA style used @ UHWO. 

ENG 210 was helpful in preparing for upper division coursework. 

Having ENG 100 as prerequisite may be barrier for working families. 

Is there enough support for students that need more help?  Julie – students write a lot, students can revise and resubmit, ask students to go to TLC, meet personally with them. 

Instructors constantly balance between scaffolding and letting students demonstrate independently. 

ED 190 – revise child observation assignment to include writing a summary for the family. 

Best practices discussion for faculty re: supporting students. 

Autobiography is a challenging assignment – requires practice/process verbally and in writing to sort out what they need to write. 

Can show writing assignment to a prereq ENG course instructor to see if there’s alignment.  Need more conversations between ENG and CTE faculty. 

Link to CASLO survey will be sent out by Eric.

Meeting adjourned at 3 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B) Expected Level Achievement

Table 1: Key assignment by standard

Criteria/

standard

Below expectations

Approaching expectations

Meets Expectations

Meets with Excellence

 

% that meet or exceed

Standard 2a - Parent interviews

 

6%

82%

12%

One student turned in only this section

94%

Standard 2a - Demographics

 

19%

25%

56%

 

81%

Standard 2a - Reflection

 

25%

63%

12%

 

75%

Standard 2b - Parent interviews

 

6%

82%

12%

One student turned in only this section

94%

Standard 2b - Reflection

 

25%

63%

12%

 

75%

Standard 2c - Reflection

 

25%

63%

12%

 

75%

 

All items relate to:

Program learning outcome 2:  Build respectful partnerships with children, families, and their communities. (To be added in Fall 2013 – criteria that will relate to advocacy (NAEYC Standard 6e, PLO 7)

 

Goal for analysis for F13:  90% at meet or exceeds, which aligns with Perkins expectations for "technical skills attainment" 1P1 core indicator.  Since Perkins is calculated using students who have stopped the program and have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 in program courses, 80% is a more realistic goal for future analysis. 

 

 

Standard 2:  Building Family and Community Relationships

Key element 2a: Knowing about and understanding diverse family and community characteristics

Key element 2b: Supporting and engaging families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships

Key element 2c: Involving families and communities in young children's development and learning

 

To be added to assignment Fall 13:

Standard 6: Becoming a professional

Key element 6e:  Engaging in informed advocacy for young children and early childhood  profession.

(This also is PLO 7 – Advocate for children and their families within the program.)

 

NAEYC ECADA Supportive Skills:

1) Self-Assessment and Self-Advocacy

2) Mastering and applying foundational concepts from general education

3) Written and verbal communication skills

4) Making connections between prior knowledge and experience and new learning

5) Identifying and using professional resources

 

C) Courses Assessed

In Fall 2012 the first key assessment for NAEYC Early Childhood Associate Degree Accreditation was launched in ED 245/FAMR 235 (Child, Family, Community).  PLO 2 was also assessed in that semester.  Key point learned in reflection – NAEYC standard 6e and PLO 7 needed to be built into the system.  That adjustment was made in Fall 2013.  Other adjustments made as a result of the assessment can be found in the next section. 

Table below shows alignment of the key assessments, courses they are in, and the PLO that is assessed.  With this schedule, every PLO will be assessed annually through the key assessments. 

 

Alignment and schedule of key assessments and PLO assessment

 

Title of assignment

Course

Semester of assessment

PLO assessed

KA 1

Professional Portfolio

ED 291V – Early Childhood Field Experience II

Every semester

1 (start F13)

KA 2

Family Interview & Demographics

ED 245/FAMR 235 – Child, Family, Community/every fall

Fall

2 (started F12), 7 (start F13)

KA 3

Research paper on condition or syndrome

ED 275 – Inclusion of Children with Special Needs

Spring

6 (start S14)

KA 4

Activity plan for young children in creativity or language

ED 263 – Language and Expressive Curriculum

Fall

3, 4 (start F13)

KA 5

Two week unit curriculum plan

ED 264 – Inquiry and Physical Curriculum

Spring

5 (start S14)

KA 6

Observation/analysis of creativity in community ECE program

ED 263 - Language and Expressive Curriculum

Fall

6 (start F13)

PLO 1. Use knowledge of child development and of individual children to create healthy, challenging learning environments and experiences

PLO 2. Build respectful partnerships with children, families, and their communities.

PLO 3. Observe, document and assess children’s development and learning in partnership with families. 

PLO 4. Build positive relationships and guide children through supportive interactions.

PLO 5. Plan, implement and assess learning experiences using appropriate content, concepts, and methods. 

PLO 6. Base decisions and actions on ethical and other professional standards.

PLO 7. Advocate for children and their families within the program.

 

 

 

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

PLO 2 was assessed using the rubric that follows the assignment instructions.

 

 

THE FAMILY INTERVIEW and

DEMOGRAPHICS ASSIGNMENT

Description

This is a Key Assignment for the Early Childhood Education Program and NAEYC Associate Degree Accreditation.  All Early Childhood Education Majors will complete this assignment.  Please place a copy into your Professional Portfolio.

The assignment is designed to help you understand and value the complex characteristics of children’s families and communities. As understanding deepens your knowledge will help you develop respectful and reciprocal relationships with families and support them in understanding their children’s development and learning.  You will complete a classroom demographics study, two family interviews, a community resource investigation, and write a reflection paper about these.

Purpose

 

Student Learning Outcomes – this assignment will help you reach the following outcomes, standards and skills.

Early Childhood Education Program Learning Outcome 2

 

Course Learning Outcomes ED 245

 

NAEYC Accreditation Standards

Key Elements

      2a:  Knowing about and understanding diverse family and community

             characteristics.

      2b:  Support and engaging families and communities through respectful,

             reciprocal relationships.

2c:  Involving families and communities in young children’s development and learning.

 

NAEYC Supportive Skills

 

ASSIGNMENT DIRECTIONS

Part 1 – Family Interviews (3 interviews – your own and two others):

Finish this part by Sept. 26.

 

 

Part 2 – Classroom Demographics:

Finish this by Oct. 31.

Demography: the statistical study of human populations especially with reference to size and density, distribution, and vital statistics.  (Merriam Webster Online Dictionary, 2009)

You will visit and interview a teacher or a director in an early childhood classroom to learn about and document the demographics of that class.  The class should have a minimum enrollment of 8 children.  If possible, interview a teacher of one of the children in your family interviews.

You are to ask the following questions about the demography of the families:

1. How many of the children enrolled in this class come from families that have:

A. Two-parent families

                  1. Families with two working parents

                  2. Families with one working parent

B.  Single parents

Mother as primary caregiver

Father as primary caregiver

         C.   Step parents/blended families

         D.   Grandparents or extended family members as primary caregivers

         E.   Foster parents

2.  What is the family size (# of family members) for each child?

         A.  How many have 2 family members

         B.  How many have 3 family members

         C.  How many have 4 family members

         D.  How many have 5 or more family members

3.  How many of the children live in extended family homes (with Grandparents, aunts, uncles or other family)?

Use the attached notes chart to record your responses.

After gathering this information you are to diagram the family composition and the family size using a simple graph such as the ones below.

 

Graph of Family Composition Demographic of Pikake Class - 12 children

Number of Families

6

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 parents

single mom

single dad

Ext Fam as Caregiver

Foster family

Graph of Family Size Demographic of Pikake Class -12 children

Number of Families

5

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

2

3

4

5+

Number of Family Members

 

 

Part 3-Reflection Paper:

You have completed your interviews, community agency research, and demographics study and you will now write a reflection paper.  This is a 2-4 page or approximately 500-1000 word paper about any new understandings or insights you have gained about families.

Submitting your assignment:

Please turn in your Demographic Study and Charts, Interview Questions, and Reflection Paper.  Apply the Family Assignment Rubric to help you complete your project competently and thoughtfully.  The Rubric components will provide information on how your project will be evaluated and help determine your grade/points for this assignment. 

This assignment with the rubric (anonymously) will be used for program assessment.

 

 

Notes from Teacher or Director Interview:

Date of Interview

 

Name of the School

 

Teacher or Director’s Name

 

Name of the Classroom

 

 

Family Composition

Number of families enrolled in the classroom

 

            Two Parent Families

 

 

 

                           With 2 working parents

 

 

 

                           With 1 working parent

 

 

 

            Single Parents

 

 

 

                           Mother as primary caregiver

 

 

 

                           Father as primary caregiver

 

 

 

            Step parents/Blended Families

 

 

 

            Grandparent or other Family member as Primary Caregiver

 

 

 

Foster family

 

 

 

 

Family Size

Number of families enrolled in the classroom

 

 

   Number of families with 2 family members

 

 

   Number of families with 3family members

 

 

   Number of families with 4 family members

 

 

   Number of families with 5 family members

 

 

   Number of families with more than 5 family members

 

 

 

Family Interview project

Part I – Family Interview Self-evaluation rubric

Due:  Sept. 18

Assessment Evidence

Standard

Well Below Expectations

Approaching Expectations

Meets Expectations

Meets Expectations  with Excellence

Parent Interviews

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2a, 2b

  • Less than half … of interviews completed
  • Criteria for selecting families is NOT followed
  • 6 or less questions developed and asked.
  • Few of the recommended components are covered in the interviews.
  • No community resource is matched and/or researched; or minimally done
  • Most of the required number of interviews completed
  • Most of the criteria for selecting families are followed
  • 7  interview questions are developed and asked.
  • Some of the recommended components are covered in the interviews
  • A community resource is matched and/or researched
  • Required number of interviews completed

 

  • All criteria for selecting families is followed

 

  • 8-10 interview questions developed and asked.
  • The recommended components are covered in the interviews
  • Two community resources are clearly researched and matched directly to family
  • More than the required number of families interviewed
  • All criteria for selecting families is followed
  • 10 or more interview questions are developed and asked
  • All and more of the recommended components are covered in the interviews
  • More than two community resources are thoroughly researched, all components included and well matched to family

Parent interview score:

Circle/underline ONE number in this row

 

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

 

Instructor agrees:  ­­­____

Instructor disagrees:  ­­­­_____

Submitting your assignment: Apply the Family Assignment Rubric to help you complete your project competently and thoughtfully.  The Rubric components will provide information on how your project will be evaluated and help determine your grade/points for this assignment.  This assignment with the rubric (anonymously) will be used for program assessment.

Family Interview project

Part II

Due Oct. 23

Self-evaluation rubric

Demographics

Study

 

 

2a

  • One or more graphs are missing or poorly attempted

 

 

  • Family graphs are difficult to follow or inaccurate
  • Family composition and size graphs are submitted

 

 

  • Family graphs are quite accurate

 

  • Readable and complete family composition and size graphs are submitted

 

  • Family graphs accurately represent information
  • A thorough and neat family composition and size graph are submitted using a bar graph, pie chart or line graph
  • Family graphs are accurate and extremely well done.

Demographic score:

Circle ONE number in this row

 

  •  

Points: 910

  •  
  •  

 

Instructor agrees:  ­­­____

Instructor disagrees:  ­­­­_____

Submitting your assignment: Apply the Family Assignment Rubric to help you complete your project competently and thoughtfully.  The Rubric components will provide information on how your project will be evaluated and help determine your grade/points for this assignment.  This assignment with the rubric (anonymously) will be used for program assessment.

 

 

Family Interviews and Demographics project

Part III

(Self-evaluation rubric for part III)

 

Assessment Evidence

Standard

Well Below Expectations

Approaching Expectations

Meets Expectations

Meets Expectations  with Excellence

Assignment turned in on time

Circle/underline ONE number in this row

 

 

 

Points:  0

One or more sections were turned in late

7      8      9 

All three sections were turned in on time

Points:  10

 

Reflection Paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2a, 2b, 2c

 

 

Support Skills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Reflection paper not completed or turned in on time
  • Absence or lack of evidence indicating  understanding of family
  • Limited or missing parenting experiences and childcare issues…
  • Poor or no evidence presented
  • Few or no responses are compared and contrasted
  • Interviewed families background, values, and/or culture are missing or incomplete.
  • Personal ideas, insights, and perspectives are not included in paper or extremely limited
  • Family practices are weak or missing
  • Sources not used and  cited properly
  • Many errors in writing conventions (grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc.)

 

  • Reflection paper not completed or turned in on time
  • Evidence indicates some understanding of family …
  • Some parenting experiences and childcare issues…
  • Limited evidence presented related to challenges and expectations of families
  • At least half of the family responses are compared and contrasted
  • Interviewed families background, values, and/or culture are beginning to be understood in the …
  • Some personal ideas, insights, and perspectives … included in paper
  • At least two practices are explained
  • Sources occasionally  utilized and  cited properly
  • Some errors in writing conventions (grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc.)
  • Reflection paper  completed and turned in on time
  • Evidence indicates understanding of family demographics compared to national demographics.
  • Parenting experiences and childcare issues are presented for each family
  • Evidence indicates understanding of challenges faced by families today and their expectations of early childhood programs.
  • Most family responses are compared and contrasted
  • Interviewed families background, values, and culture are understood in the context of …
  • Personal ideas, insights, and perspectives ….included  in paper
  • Three practices ECE programs use are explained
  • Sources utilized and  cited properly
  • Minimal and/or minor errors in writing conventions (grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc.)
  • Reflection paper   completed and turned in on time or early
  • Substantial  evidence with rich examples  indicates  understanding of family demographics compared to national demographics
  • Substantial parenting experiences and childcare issues are thoughtfully presented and discussed  for each family
  • Substantial evidence indicates understanding of challenges faced by families today and their expectations for early childhood programs.
  • All family responses are thoughtfully compared and contrasted
  • Interviewed families background, values, and culture are well understood in the context of the interviews
  • Personal ideas, insights and perspectives on how you will use what you have learned are thoughtful and meaningful.
  • Three or more practices ECE programs use to support families with young children are well explained
  • Additional sources utilized  and cited properly
  • No errors in writing conventions (grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc.)

Reflection score:

Circle/underline ONE number in this row

 

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

TOTAL SCORE (Add the 2 numbers circled above: 

 

 

Instructor agrees:  ­­­____

Instructor disagrees:  ­­­­_____

Submitting your assignment: Apply the Family Assignment Rubric to help you complete your project competently and thoughtfully.  The Rubric components will provide information on how your project will be evaluated and help determine your grade/points for this assignment.  This assignment with the rubric (anonymously) will be used for program assessment.

 

E) Results of Program Assessment

Analysis and reflection on Table 1:

 

The Program Advisory Committee, which includes a student, was the committee that reviewed the Written Communication CASLO, along with CASLO assessment coordinator and committee member.See report in appendix.Changes that resulted from the review include:

  1. Adjusting assignments in practicum courses (ED 190, 191V, 291V) to require the type of summary writing that is family-friendly, accurate, and concise.  This type of writing was requested by the employers and identified as a gap in the curriculum.
  2. Confirmation that requiring ENG 100 before taking any ED courses has the potential to discourage students.  Scaffolding their skills within courses and encouraging students to take their general education along with ED courses is preferable.  This came from the student representative, who is a part-time student and single parent of three children.  Her perspective reflects many of the students in the program. 

Program coordinator is building ENG 210 (Research Writing) before ED 275 in education plans with students in order to maximize success in 275 which requires a research paper. 

F) Other Comments

The Advisory Committee meets formally once a year, and program faculty interact with committee members in other arenas throughout the year. 

Review of CASLO was a valuable experience for committee and faculty, and will be continued.  Program faculty are involved in various ECE groups locally and statewide, and are seen as a resource for the Maui ECE community. 

Results of analysis of key assessments will be sent by email to Advisory committee with invitations for comment. Changes in curriculum that resulted from 2012 CASLO will also be shared. See appendix for minutes of last meeting. 

 

  1. Recognize and Support Best Practices: 

Graduate Katherine Larsen was given Early Childhood Champion Award in May 2013.

G) Next Steps

2012 goal

Status Oct. 2013

Plan key assignments that align with NAEYC standards and supportive skills in preparation for ECADA.

Done

Improve pedagogy to assure meeting Perkins 1P1, 2P2, 4P1 goals.

1P1 (Tech skills attainment): not met this year.

2P2: not included in this year’s data

4P1 (student placement): Met

Change course alphas to ECED

In process Fall 2013 for implementation Fall 2014.Honolulu and Hawai’i also changing alphas

Apply for ECADA Fall 2014 for Spring 2015 visit – need 2 years of data

On track

 

We have created a process that nests the PLOs into the NAEYC accreditation process.

Involving the Advisory Committee in the CASLO process was very successful. The example of a student on the Advisory Committee has been shared as a practice to consider for all advisory committees.The committee feedback was very positive – they felt valued and honored to be part of the assessment process.