University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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Review Year: College: Program:

College: Windward Community College
Program: Hawaiian Studies

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The last comprehensive review for this program was on n/a.

Program Description

Windward CCʻs new associate in arts degree in Hawaiian Studies was collaboratively developed by the community college campuses as an option to prepare students to transfer to a Hawaiian studies baccalaureate degree path at UH MA�noa or UH Hilo. It marks the first time a degree was approved for all the University of Hawaiʻi's seven community colleges.

It also provides the option to earn an associate degree that provides the qualifications that would be beneficial in the workforce or or other areas of study where a knowledge of the host culture are desired. Students have an opportunity to follow a path of Hawaiian knowledge that, once they graduate, will allow them to take that knowledge into the workforce and back to their communities.

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: To Be Determined

Majors Included: HWST     Program CIP: 05.0202

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
1 Number of Majors     14 To Be Determined
1a     Number of Majors Native Hawaiian     10
1b     Fall Full-Time     67%
1c     Fall Part-Time     33%
1d     Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System     0%
1e     Spring Full-Time     33%
1f     Spring Part-Time     67%
1g     Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System     5%
2 *Percent Change Majors from Prior Year      
3 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes      
4 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes      
5 SSH in All Program Classes      
6 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes      
7 Total Number of Classes Taught      

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
8 Average Class Size       To Be Determined
9 *Fill Rate      
10 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty      
11 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty      
12 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty      
12a Analytic FTE Faculty      
13 Overall Program Budget Allocation      
13a General Funded Budget Allocation      
13b Special/Federal Budget Allocation      
13c Tuition and Fees      
14 Cost per SSH      
15 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes      
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
10-11 11-12 12-13
16 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher)       Healthy
17 Withdrawals (Grade = W)      
18 *Persistence (Fall to Spring)     83.3%
18a Persistence Fall to Fall     16.6%
19 Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded Prior Fiscal Year     0
19a Associate Degrees Awarded     0
19b Academic Subject Certificates Awarded     0
19c Goal      
19d *Difference Between Unduplicated Awarded and Goal      
20 Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
20a Transfers with degree from program     0
20b Transfers without degree from program     0
20c Increase by 3% Annual Transfers to UH 4-yr Goal      
20d *Difference Between Transfers and Goal      

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
21 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught      

 

22 Enrollments Distance Education Classes      
23 Fill Rate      
24 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher)      
25 Withdrawals (Grade = W)      
26 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education)      

Performance Funding Program Year  
10-11 11-12 12-13
27 Number of Degrees and Certificates     0

 

28 Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian     0
29 Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM     Not STEM
30 Number of Pell Recipients     10
31 Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr     0
*Data element used in health call calculation Last Updated: January 27, 2014
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

Demand strengths and weaknesses:

The AA program in Hawaiian Studies came online for the first time in the Fall 2012 semester. Even without an official public launch we had a total of 14 students sign up as majors. We are confident that this number will increase each year for many years to come as more students become aware of the degree and its advantages.

SSH registers zero at the moment, which we expect to change as HWST classes are reclassified to count toward the AA HWST instead of counting toward the AA in Liberal Arts.

 

Efficiency

The majors to BOR appointed FTE faculty is 13.5:1. This will be an area of concern as the number of majors increases and the community and student demand results in an anticipated increase in this ratio over the next several years. The class size and fill rate should be adjusted next year as HWST classes are reclassified to count toward the AA HWST instead of counting toward the AA in Liberal Arts.

 

Effectiveness

The effectiveness so far of the program looks to be very healthy with a persistence rate from Fall to Soring of 83.3%. All other indicators are too early to tell in terms of their analytical contrast from year to year. I am uncertain as to the explanation of the low Fall to Fall persistence rate, 16%. Does this mean students are graduating, but it is not reported as graduates from our degree program? Does this mean students are leaving the college?

 

Distance Education

There were five Hawaiian Studies classes last year that were offered online. The statistics in this area will adjust over time as HWST classes are reclassified to count toward the AA HWST instead of counting toward the AA in Liberal Arts.

 

Update on Action Plan

There was no previous action plan for the AA in Hawaiian Studies the previous year. There is nothing to report in terms of significant action for the AA Hawaiian Studies degree.

Part III. Action Plan

We will market our degree program to students and the community in an effort to bring in new majors from the college and new majors from the community into the college. An effort will be made to try and collect data to see how many students come to WCC specifically to enroll in the AA in Hawaiian Studies.

 

We will broaden assessment of our program to include analysis of more SLO with our PLO and the college Gen Ed LO.

Part IV. Resource Implications

In anticipation of increased enrollment and the mentoring that will be needed; to help teach the current and new curriculum needed for the new degree program, and to help manage the new facilities that have been built in support of the new degree program, Hawaiian Studies has requested:

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2012-2013 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No
Describe aboriginal Hawaiian linguistic, cultural, historical and political concepts.

2

No
Apply aboriginal Hawaiian concepts, knowledge and methods to the areas of science, humanities, arts and social sciences – in academics and in other professional endeavors.

3

No
Engage, articulate and analyze topics relevant to the aboriginal Hawaiian community using college-­‐level research and writing methods.

A) Expected Level Achievement

No PLOs were assessed this year, but all of them will be assessed for next year's report.

B) Courses Assessed

No courses were assessed this year, but five of them will be assessed and reported on for next year's report.

C) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

n/a

D) Results of Program Assessment

n/a

E) Other Comments

No courses nor PLOs were assessed this year, but five courses and all PLOs will be assessed for next year's report.

F) Next Steps

n/a