University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

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In AY2012-2013, HawaiiCC had 27 instructional programs including AA--Liberal Arts and AA—Hawaiian Studies, all of which submit Annual Program Reviews.  Also submitting annual program reviews are the remedial/developmental areas—reading, writing and math.  The respective overall program health for four years are as follows:

1.   Accounting (ACC) 2013-C; 2012-H; 2011-H; 2010-C

2.   Administration of Justice (AJ) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011-C; 2010-C

3.   Agriculture (AG) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011-U; 2010-C

4    Architectural Engineering & CAD Technologies (AEC) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011- C; 2010-C

5.   Auto Body Repair & Painting (AEC) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011-H; 2010-H

6.   Automotive Mechanics Technology (AMT) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011- C; 2010-C

7.   Business Technology (BTEC) 2013-H; 2012-H; 2011-H; 2010-C

8.   Carpentry (CARP) 2013-H; 2012-C; 2011- C; 2010-C

9.   Culinary Arts (CULN) 2013-H; 2012-H; 2011-H; 2010-H

10. Diesel Mechanics (DISL) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011-C; 2010-C

11. Digital Media Arts (DMA) 2013-U; 2012-C; 2011-C; 2010-C

12. Early Childhood Education (ECED) 2013-C; 2012-U; 2011-C; 2010-C

13. Electrical Installation & Maintenance Technology (EIMT) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011-C; 2010-C

14. Electronics Technology (ET) 2013-C; 2012-U; 2011-C; 2010-C

15. Fire Science (FS) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011-C; 2010-C

16. Hawai‘i Life Styles (HLS) 2013-H; 2012-H; 2011-C; 2010-C

17. Hospitality and Tourism (HOST) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011-C; 2010-U

18. Human Services (HSER) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011-C; 2010-H

19. Information Technology (IT) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011-C; 2010-C

20. Machine, Welding & Industrial Mechanics Technologies (MWIM) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011-C; 2010-C

21. Marketing (MKT) 2013-C; 2012-H; 2011-C; 2010-C

22. Nursing, Associate in Science Degree (NURS) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011-C; 2010-C

23. Nursing, Practical (PRCN) 2013-H; 2012-H; 2011-H; 2010-H

24. Substance Abuse Counseling (SUBS) 2013-C; 2012-C; 2011-H; 2010-C

25. Tropical Forest Ecosystem & Agroforestry Management (TEAM) 2013-C; 2012-U; 2011-C; 2010-C

26. AA – Hawaiian Studies (HWST) 2013-TBD

27. AA -- Liberal Arts (LBRT) 2013-H; 2012-H; 2011-H; 2010-H

28. Remedial/Developmental: Math 2013-C; 2012-C

29. Remedial/Developmental: Reading 2013-H; 2012-U

30. Remedial/Developmental: Writing 2013-H; 2012-C

Of the 27 instructional programs, six (6) were deemed Overall Healthy, nineteen (19) Cautionary, one (1) Unhealthy, and because AA-HWST is a new program, its health has not been determined.  For comparison, in AY2011-2012, seven (7) were deemed Healthy, eighteen (18) Cautionary, and three (3) Unhealthy.  CULN, PRCN, and LBRT programs have been healthy for the past 4 years; BTEC program for the past three years; HLS for the past two years; with CARP adding to make it six.  Two programs—CULN and LBRT—were Healthy in all areas.   Only DMA was deemed Overall Unhealthy.  ACC and MKT fell off the Healthy list.

Demand Indicators

There are fourteen (14) programs deemed Unhealthy in the area of Demand which is of concern.  For the Career Technical Education (CTE) programs, the numbers of New & Replacement Positions used in the formula is problematic.   It is difficult to get the benchmark ratio of 1.5-4.0 majors per jobs.  In addition having only one Classification of Instructional Program (CIP) code per major is limiting as it may not reflect all the jobs that the program prepares students for as well as it may include jobs that programs do not prepare students for.  Nine (9) programs were deemed Healthy, three (3) Cautionary, and fourteen (14) unhealthy.

Efficiency Indicators

Thirteen (13) programs were Healthy in the area of Efficiency.  AG and DISL both had 100% fill rates.  Twelve (12) programs had healthy fill rates, nine (9) were cautionary, and five (5) unhealthy.  Those with unhealthy fill rates ET, IT, MWIM, MKT, TEAM is of concern and need to be addressed.  ET and MWIM were on a temporary one-year Stop Out to revamp their curriculum and hopefully the changes made will result in increased enrollment.  The others continue to struggle with enrollment and will need to seriously analyze their programs and make necessary changes to be sustainable.  ET was without a BOR Appointed Faculty 2010 to spring 2012.  The program was placed on Temporary Stop Out for AY2011-2012, not accepting new students into the program.  The curriculum is being assessed and has an action plan to grow the program.  IT has 42.5 majors, an increase of 7.5, but it continues to struggle with class enrollment.  MWIM is without one (1) BOR Appointed Faculty since January 2012 and is currently in recruitment.  The program was placed on Temporary Stop Out for AY2012-2013, not accepting new students into the program.  The curriculum was redesigned and the welding and machining components which were offered as two separate tracks have been combined into one track offering CC, CA, and AAS, effective fall 2013.  MKT’s number of majors has not changed for the past three years.  It is of concern because a vacant 1.0 FTE MKT position was reappropriated to MKT so it currently has two (2) – 1.0 FTE faculty positions.  The program is working to create a General Business concentration as a pathway to UH-Hilo and UH-WO.  TEAM continues to struggle with its Fill Rate.  Faculty have been trying creative ways to build the program including transfer pathways to UH-Hilo.  Number of majors continue to decline at an alarming rate.  ET, IT, and TEAM are STEM identified programs so are valuable programs for the College.  These programs will need to take serious measures to build enrollment in order to be considered viable programs.

AJ, DMA, FS, HOST, and SUBS were Unhealthy in the area of Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty.  AJ has 132.5 majors and only 1 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty.  Based on the number of majors, AJ needs another BOR appointed faculty, however, hiring lecturers, specialized in content areas to fill the gaps, has been valuable for the students.  DMA has two BOR Appointed Faculty who teach DMA courses, however they are both assigned to ART under the Liberal Arts program and teach both DMA and ART classes.  FS has 79.5 majors and only 1 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty.  FS received permanent status from the BOR in May 2013.  It’s experiencing growing pains and number of majors in 2012-2013 was at its lowest with 79.5 majors, compared to 91.5 in 2010-2011 and 102.5 in 2011-2012.  HOST has one (1) FTE BOR Appointed Faculty who was hired as a food service faculty.   This has been recently corrected and will be reflected in the next ARPD.  The number of SUBS majors has been declining over the past three (3) years.  This program is trying to survive without a BOR Appointed Faculty.  An Education Specialist was hired to assist with academic advising and student support for program majors for both AJ and SUBS.  The program recently added a Prevention Specialist Certificate of Competence to attract new majors and enhance the program.

Effectiveness Indicators

In the area of Effectiveness, five (5) programs were Healthy, nineteen (19) Cautionary, and two (2) Unhealthy.  The New & Replacement Positions are also used in one of the formulas to determine Effectiveness and is the reason for many of the programs to be deemed Cautionary or Unhealthy.   A benchmark ratio of .75 to 1.5 Unduplicated Degrees & Certificates Awarded to New & Replacement Positions, needs to be maintained to earn a Healthy score in this area and eight (8) programs managed to score within that range.  Five (5) programs scored Unhealthy meaning the ratio was less than .25 or greater than 3.0.

In the area of Persistence, eight (8) programs were Healthy, twelve (12) Cautionary, and six (6) Unhealthy.  DISL’s Persistence Rate decreased from 75% to 56.5%.  DISL implemented program changes which could be the reason for such a decline.  Successful Completion continues to be high at 91% and zero students withdrew.  Probably as a result of the program changes, Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates was only four (4) in comparison to eight (8) the previous year.  The Alu Like grant that supported all of the Native Hawaiian students in DMA classes ended which is perhaps the reason all indicators have gone south.  Persistence was 53.5% and Successful Completion 76%, a 6% decrease from previous year.  The number of withdrawals is excessive and must be addressed; 2010-2011 – 19, 2011-2012 – 17, 2012-2013 – 25.  Ten (10) certificates were awarded.  FIRE’s Persistence dropped from 74.3% to 59.3% with 87% Successful Completion and three (3) Withdrawals, an improvement from 17 the previous year.  Eight (8) Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates were awarded.  HSER has been caught in a FA dilemma.  This is a 21 credit Certificate and students who are pursuing this certificate and LBRT are advised to declare LBRT as their major.  For the past three years, number of certificates awarded has doubled each year, 8 – 16 – 32.  Persistence is dismal at 18.1% with 79% Successful Completion and seven (7) withdrawals.  PRCN is deemed Overall Healthy; however Persistence is only 43.5% with 85% Successful Completion and eight (8) Certificates awarded.  SUBS Persistence was 38.1% with 81% Successful Completion and nine (9) Withdrawals.  The number of withdrawals is of concern.  There were four (4) from the program that transferred without credential which could be a factor in the low Persistence rate. 

The benchmark ratio of greater than 20% Unduplicated Degrees & Certificates Awarded to Number of Majors, needs to be maintained to earn a Healthy score in this area and thirteen (13) programs hit that mark.   Seven (7) programs were Unhealthy with ratios of less than 15%.   Hopefully with intrusive advising, indicators in the Effectiveness area will improve.   

Performance Funding

For AY 2012-2013, HawCC met four (4) performance outcomes, not meeting the STEM outcome.  Effective fall 2013, HawCC is offering the AS-NS degree and is hopeful this degree will help to boost our STEM numbers.  DMA, HSER, and SUBS offer Certificates of Completions only so are not counted as degrees earned.  All others contributed to the number of degrees and certificates and Native Hawaiian attainment.  All programs had students who were Pell Recipients.  A total of 232 students transferred to a UH 4-Year institution.  Out of the 232, 87 transferred with credential and 145 without.  As expected the most transfers was from LBRT with 137 transferring, 65 with and 72 without degrees followed by NURS-AS with 30 students transferring, 4 with and 26 without degrees.  Those transferring were from 21 out of 27 programs.  Five (5) AS programs had transfers; TEAM being the only AS program without transfers; totaling 54, 15 with and 39 without credentials.  Out of the 19 terminal degree programs, 14 programs had students who transferred totaling 41 students; 7 with and 34 without credentials.

Distance Education:  Completely On-line Classes (DCO)

Ten (10) programs offer DCO totaling 137 DE classes taught.  3120 students (duplicated) enrolled in DE classes with Fill Rates averaging 80%, ranging from 92% to 45%.  There were 242 withdrawals (8%) with Successful Completion averaging 67.4%, ranging from 80% to 48%, DMA and HLS respectively.  Persistence averages about 50.2%.  LBRT offer the highest number of DCO classes at 95 with enrollment of 2237.  Fill Rate is 87%, Success 65%, Withdrawals 190, and Persistence 68%.

Perkins IV Core Indicators 2011-2012

The programs did not perform well in meeting the Perkins Indicators.  None of the programs met all indicators.  IT was the only program that met five of the indicators, not meeting with 2P1.  ABRP did not meet any of the indicators. 

Remedial/Developmental (R/D)

Remedial/Developmental Math (R/D Math)

The Overall Program Health for R/D Math is Cautionary.  The Demand Indicators all decreased and is Cautionary.  The AtD Fall 2010 Cohort data increased in all areas.  There was a 1% increase in the Percent Enrolling but does not meet the 3% goal.

Efficiency is Healthy although the Average Class Size and Fill Rate both decreased and the number of low enrolled classes increased from 0 to 5.  Ironically even with these decreases, faculty teaching classes increased by 1.2 positions.  The R/D Math noted percentage of classes taught by full-time faculty (37%) versus non regular discipline faculty (63%).

Effectiveness is Cautionary.  Retention 1 Level Below College Level dramatically decreased from 94% to 76%; 2 Levels Below College Level increase 2% to 95%; and 3 or More Levels Below College Level remained the same at 97%.  Successful completion at 1 Level Below College Level decreased by 7% to 52% with 10 withdrawals compared to 3 the previous year.  Success at 2 Levels Below College Level also decreased by 4% to 60% with 27 withdrawals compared to 36 the previous year.  Success at 3 or More Levels Below College Level increased by 1% to 64% with 43 withdrawals compared to 56 the previous year.

The AtD Cohort Enrolled in R/D Math was 443 with 320 successfully completing at least one R/D course, a 72% success rate.  This percentage has been consistent for the past three years.

The AtD Cohort size is 1102 students.  81% placed into R/D math and 40% actually enrolled in R/D math course.  36% successfully completed R/D math course within first academic year with 10% successfully completing a college level math course within first academic year.

Persistence (Fall to Spring) from 1 level below college level to college level is only 7.1%.  Percent from 2 levels below college level to 1 level below is 5% and percent from 3 or more levels below college level to 2 levels below is 25%.  Success of college level from 1 level below is 100% but this comprises of only one (1) student.  Four (4) students were successful at 1 level below from 2 levels below college level and thirty (30) students were successful at 2 levels below from 3 or more levels below college level.

Remedial/Developmental Reading

The Overall Program Health for R/D Reading is Healthy.  The Demand Indicators all decreased but remains Healthy with an increase in Percent Enrolling of 3%, which meets the goal.

Efficiency is Healthy although the Average Class Size and Fill Rate slightly decreased.  The number of low enrolled classes decreased from 2 to 0.  36% of R/D Reading courses are taught by full-time faculty versus 64% by non-regular discipline faculty.  This ratio has been consistent.

Effectiveness is Cautionary.  Retention 1 level below college level increased 1% from 95%.  2 levels below college level increased 1% to 99%; and 3 or more levels below college level increased by 9% to 100%.  Successful completion at 1 level below college level decreased 3% to 59% with 22 withdrawals compared to 27 the previous year.  Success at 2 levels below college level also increased by 9% to 63% with 1 withdrawal compared to 2 the previous year.  Success at 3 or more levels below college level increased by 17% to 58% with 0 withdrawals compared to 4 the previous year.

The AtD Cohort Enrolled in R/D Reading was 336 with 193 successfully completing at least one R/D course, a 57% success rate.  This percentage was an increase of 10% compared to the previous year.

The AtD Cohort size is 1102 students.  41% placed into R/D Reading and 30% actually enrolled in R/D Reading course.  42% successfully completed R/D Reading course within first academic year with 41% successfully completing a college level Reading course within first academic year.

Persistence (Fall to Spring) from 1 level below college level to college level is 15.3%.  Percent from 2 levels below college level to 1 level below is 84% and percent from 3 or more levels below college level to 2 levels below is 50%.  Success of college level from 1 level below is 72.4%.  Fifteen (15) students were successful at 1 level below from 2 levels below college level and two (2) students were successful at 2 levels below from 3 or more levels below college level.

Remedial/Developmental Writing

The Overall Program Health for R/D Writing is Healthy.  The Demand Indicators all decreased but remains Healthy with an increase in Percent Enrolling of 4%, which exceeds the goal.

Efficiency is Healthy although the Average Class Size and Fill Rate decreased.  The number of low enrolled classes increased from 1 to 5.  36% of R/D Reading courses are taught by full-time faculty versus 64% by non-regular discipline faculty.  This ratio has been consistent.

Effectiveness is Cautionary.  Retention 1 level below college level decreased 1% from 94%.  2 levels below college level decreased 1% to 96%; and 3 or more levels below college level increased by 2% to 96%.  Successful completion at 1 level below college level increased 4% to 54% with 31 withdrawals compared to 30 the previous year.  Success at 2 levels below college level also increased by 10% to 65% with 9 withdrawals compared to 8 the previous year.  Success at 3 or more levels below college level increased by 7% to 63% with 5 withdrawals compared to 8 the previous year.

The AtD Cohort Enrolled in R/D Writing was 371 with 213 successfully completing at least one R/D course, a 57% success rate.  This percentage was an increase of 5% compared to the previous year.

The AtD Cohort size is 1102 students.  60% placed into R/D Writing and 34% actually enrolled in R/D Writing course.  32% successfully completed R/D Writing course within first academic year with 29% successfully completing a college level Writing course within first academic year.

Persistence (Fall to Spring) from 1 level below college level to college level is 52.3%.  Percent from 2 levels below college level to 1 level below is 63% and percent from 3 or more levels below college level to 2 levels below is 58%.  Success of college level from 1 level below is 69.6%.  Thirty-two (32) students were successful at 1 level below from 2 levels below college level and twenty-one (21) students were successful at 2 levels below from 3 or more levels below college level.