University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Instructional Annual Report of Program Data (ARPD)

Select the desired review year, college, and program from the drop down menus. Once a program has been selected, the results will be displayed.

Review Year: College: Program:

College: Kapiolani Community College
Program: Hospitality and Tourism

Printer Friendly

PDF PDF

The last comprehensive review for this program was on 2009.

Program Description

DESCRIPTION

The Hospitality and Tourism Education Department provides students with program options and concentrations in Hospitality Operations Management, and Travel & Tourism Operations Management. The Certificate of Completion program options are designed to help students acquire technical skills, qualifying them for entry level employment after one semester's training, whereas the Certificate of Achievement program options are attained after three semesters. These courses are the basic first, second, and third semester requirements for the corresponding Associate in Science Degrees. These options provide students with flexibility in their educational and career planning. Students choosing to exit the program may re-enter at any time but must follow the current program in effect at the time they re-enter, not the one in effect at the time they exited. The strength of the Hospitality andTourism Programs continues to be the practical hands-on application of theory and academics in active laboratory settings.

Hospitality & Tourism Education Department Mission Statement

The program is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Programs in Hospitality Administration (ACPHA). 

Part I. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Cautionary

Majors Included: HROP,TRAV

Demand Indicators Program Year Demand Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
1 New & Replacement Positions (State) 0 0 447 Cautionary
2 *New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated) 0 0 242
3 *Number of Majors 0 0 246
4 SSH Program Majors in Program Classes 0 0 2,367
5 SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes 0 0 1,513
6 SSH in All Program Classes 0 0 3,880
7 FTE Enrollment in Program Classes 0 0 129
8 Total Number of Classes Taught 0 0 54

Efficiency Indicators Program Year Efficiency Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
9 Average Class Size 0 0 22.8 Healthy
10 *Fill Rate 0% 0% 89%
11 FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 0 5
12 *Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty 0 0 49.2
13 Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty 0 0 40.3
13a Analytic FTE Faculty 0 0 6.1
14 Overall Program Budget Allocation Not Yet Reported Not Yet Reported $625,757
14a General Funded Budget Allocation Not Yet Reported Not Yet Reported $598,322
14b Special/Federal Budget Allocation Not Yet Reported Not Yet Reported $0
14c Tuition and Fees Not Reported Not Reported $27,436
15 Cost per SSH Not Yet Reported Not Yet Reported $161
16 Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes 0 0 3

Effectiveness Indicators Program Year Effectiveness Health Call
09-10 10-11 11-12
17 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 0% 0% 86% Cautionary
18 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 0 0 43
19 *Persistence (Fall to Spring) 0% 0% 72%
20 *Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded 0 0 46
20a Degrees Awarded 0 0 28
20b Certificates of Achievement Awarded 0 0 13
20c Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded 0 0 0
20d Other Certificates Awarded 0 0 18
21 External Licensing Exams Passed Not Reported Not Reported Not Reported
22 Transfers to UH 4-yr 0 0 18
22a Transfers with credential from program 0 0 6
22b Transfers without credential from program 0 0 12

Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes
Program Year  
09-10 10-11 11-12
23 Number of Distance Education Classes Taught 0 0 7  
24 Enrollment Distance Education Classes 0 0 163
25 Fill Rate 0% 0% 86%
26 Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher) 0% 0% 75%
27 Withdrawals (Grade = W) 0 0 13
28 Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education) 0% 0% 67%

Perkins IV Core Indicators
2010-2011
Goal Actual Met  
29 1P1 Technical Skills Attainment 90.10 98.15 Met  
30 2P1 Completion 45.00 50.93 Met
31 3P1 Student Retention or Transfer 56.00 70.06 Met
32 4P1 Student Placement 51.00 37.96 Not Met
33 5P1 Nontraditional Participation N/A N/A N/A
34 5P2 Nontraditional Completion N/A N/A N/A
Last Updated: August 6, 2012
Glossary | Health Call Scoring Rubric

Part II. Analysis of the Program

This year’s ARPD represents the first year of reporting data with the programs of Hospitality Operations Management and Travel and Tourism Operations Management combined as two concentrations within a single major: Hospitality and Tourism.  In the past, the separation of the programs made the reporting of ARPD awkward, and measurements artificial, as all departmental faculty teach classes in both concentrations.  While the combining of the programs will make for a cleaner determination of performance factors moving forward, it also eliminates comparable historical data for the past two years.  For comparison sake, efforts will be made this year to combine the individual program reports from last year.

Demand

Demand indicators for the program are indicated as ”cautionary.” In combining the enrollment of last year’s ARPD for the Hotel and the Travel programs the enrollment would equal 253.  This year’s enrollment of 246 represents a slight decrease consistent with a trend the program has seen:  when the economy dips, enrollment increases; and when the economy rebounds, enrollments tend to drop off for the community colleges.  The modest decrease in department majors in the past year is consistent with a slight downtrend in overall campus numbers.

Additionally, in looking at the combined “new & replacement positions (county prorated) from both programs last year the total was 173.  This year’s county replacement total jumped to 242, an increase of 69 positions, or a 39.8% increase.  While an increase is understandable in light of a recovering economy, this jump in new & replacement jobs seems excessive and is more likely the result of the new process of compiling data based on CIP codes rather than the SOC codes used in the past.

So the slight decrease in majors combined with what seems to be a skewed increase in new and replacement positions, combined to create a “Cautionary” determination for demand.

Efficiency

It was hoped that combining the two programs into one major would create a clearer picture of efficiency regarding the counting of faculty members, and that turned out to be the case, with efficiency indicated as “Healthy.”

Average class sizes ran at 22.8 which is consistent with the programs emphasis on lecture/lab formats that integrate the use of computers and other engaged learning activities. The lecture/lab format affects our class sizes as enrollment is limited to the number of computers and seats available in the lab classes. Enrollment is generally set at 24 to 25 seats.

The fill rate of 89% is considered Healthy and represents the department’s efforts to monitor enrollment and cancel under-enrolled sections.  

While the class sizes and fill rates are Healthy, the Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty is Cautionary at 49.2 student to 1 full-time faculty member.  In order to get to a Healthy range (less than 35 students per FT faculty) the HOST department should have seven (7) full-time faculty positions.  The department continues to rely on adjunct lecturers for the delivery of courses. Currently, two adjunct lecturers teach an average of 13 to 14 credits a semester.

Effectiveness

While the program’s effectiveness is rated as “Cautionary,” there are a number of positive indicators to look at.  Successful Completions for Travel and Tourism (TRAV) and Hotel/Restaurant (HROP) for 2010-2011 were both 85%.  For 2011-12 combined, this number has increased to 86%.  Persistence rates for TRAV and HROP were 71% and 70% respectively in 2010-11, and while still in the cautionary range, this number has increased to 72% (slightly below the goal of 75+%)

In 2010-11 15 students in the combined TRAV and HODT programs transferred to 4-year programs at UH.  For 2011-12 this number increased to 18. This positive trends should continue with the adoption of a planned articulation agreement with UH West Oahu.  Efforts also continue to strengthen the articulation with the UH Manoa School of Travel Industry Management (TIM).

Combined withdrawals for TRAV and HROP in 2010-11totalled 40.  For 2011-12 this number has increased to 43.  One of the action plans will be to look at the withdrawals taking place in on-line vs. in-class section to see if there is a pronounced difference.  The HOST department has been successful in developing more of the courses for on-line delivery, but this in turn may be contributing to more withdrawals as students in an on-line environment receive less direct support and encouragement than in-class students.  In comparison, the overall completion percentage for HOST is 86% vs. completely on-line classes at 75%.  Overall persistence for the HOST department is 72% vs. on-line classes of 67%

Perkins

All Perkins IV Core Indicators have been met with the exception of 4P1 – Student Placement.  In the past, TRAV placement numbers have traditionally been lower than those of HROP.  This is attributed to the fact that generally the TRAV concentration has a high percentage of international students whereas the HROP concentration has a tendency to attract more local students.  Perkins Grant money has been obtained to develop plans for improving job placement in the Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs. 

Part III. Action Plan

Hospitality and Tourism Education Department 2012 -15 Tactical Plan Initiatives

  1. Increase Program Enrollment
  2. Increase the number/percentage of local students
  3. Increase the persistence rates (fall to spring re-enrollment)
  4. Obtain one (1) additional full-time teaching position
  5. Develop a campaign to raise the awareness of the need and viability for an on-campus practicum hotel
  6. Remain current with technology needs with equipment and software upgrades within the classrooms/labs 

Goals 1 through 4 were written specifically with the ARPD results in mind.  Additionally, the HOST department was successful in gaining a Perkins grant to specifically address enrollment management with the objective to increase enrollment, the number of local students, and develop strategies and interventions that can assist with improved persistence rates.

Enrollment Initiatives

This proposal is to develop an enrollment management plan for Kapi‘olani Community College’s hospitality program in order to increase the overall enrollment and improve the mix of local residents in the program in order to increase completion numbers for KCC graduates entering the Hawai‘i tourism workforce. 

Enrollment management success for the HOST department will be dependent on determining key markets and developing strategies to market to these segments. Central to this idea is the need for accurate data on the demographic and geographic profiles of the students currently enrolled in the HOST program. 

Not having a detailed analysis of who we serve has made it difficult to: 1) focus our recruiting efforts towards our major markets and, 2) develop programs and services that meet the needs of the students. Admittedly, many services are available on a campus-wide basis but, the HOST department believes that students often identify and seek support from within their major. 

An ongoing challenge for the HOST department is we have put considerable effort into recruiting students from high schools, yet we have an incomplete picture of which high schools the students are coming from.  Anectdotally, we believe that most of our students are not coming to us straight out of high school but instead, are non-traditional and international students.

Another issue faced by the HOST department as well as other Hospitality programs and the industry as a whole, is the perception of the volatility and lack of stability within our industry.  Some parents and potential students have a perception that a career in the service industry is not significant or sustainable and they fail to appreciate the full magnitude and potential of the hospitality industry. Efforts are being made to overcome this perception by the Hawai‘i Hotel Lodging and Tourism Association and through workforce development initiatives.

Recruitment Action Items:

This kind of information will enable us to strengthen our marketing efforts by: 1) refining our program, curriculum, and services, and 2) allowing us to validate our success to potential applicants.

Action Plans and Programs for HOST include:

Enrollment Management Activities:

Goal 4 - Obtaining one additional full-time position is essential to support department growth and would address the deficiency indicated in line 12 of the quantitative data above: the Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty is Cautionary at 49.2 student to 1 full-time faculty member.  In order to get to a Healthy range (less than 35 students per FT faculty) the HOST department should have seven (7) full-time faculty positions.  The department continues to rely on adjunct lecturers for the delivery of courses. Currently, two adjunct lecturers teach an average of 13 to 14 credits a semester. 

Part IV. Resource Implications

9.   Perkins Grant: Year One = $30,000.  This grand supports the HOST program's enrollment management plan. 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

For the 2011-2012 program year, some or all of the following P-SLOs were reviewed by the program:

Assessed
this year?
Program Student Learning Outcomes

1

No
1. Use knowledge and skills associated with problem solving, creative and critical thinking, reflection and decision making to function effectively in the classroom, community and industry.

2

No
2. Apply the concepts and skills necessary to achieve guest satisfaction.

3

No
3. Demonstrate leadership and teamwork to achieve common goals.

4

No
4. Conduct him/herself in a professional and ethical manner, and practice industry defined work ethics.

5

No
5. Communicate effectively and confidently in the classroom, community and industry.

6

No
6. Demonstrate knowledge of multicultural perspectives to meet the needs of the guests and employees.

7

No
7. Lead with the knowledge that the foundation of tourism is based on the respect of the host culture with the responsibility to perpetuate the unique values, traditions, and practices of the place.

8

No
9. Demonstrate ability to perform basic and supervisory level job functions in travel/tourism and hotel/restaurant career.

9

No
8. Use knowledge of best practices to further sustainability (economic, environmental, and cultural/social) in the industry.

A) Evidence of Industry Validation

HOST TIMELINE:

Spring 2011 All 9 of the HOST’s Programs SLOs were assessed with two (7 & 8) assessed as “NOT MET”

Fall 2011 HOST Program SLOs that were “NOT MET” (7 & 8) in the Spring 2011 assessment were re-assessed based on improvements made to activities, rubrics and measurements and were determined to have “MET EXPECTATIONS” 

Evidence of Industry Validation:

Program outcomes were validated by the Advisory Committee on 4-22-10.

B) Expected Level Achievement

1. Internship Supervisor Evaluation Report “Satisfactory” performance rating of 3 or higher on a 5 point scale. 

2. Self Reports a) “Adequately meets expectations of management” rating or better b) 70% of students or more note a self a improvement since enrolling in the HOST program 

C) Courses Assessed

Course Assessment Report HOST TIMELINE:

Spring 2011 (2 or more sections being offered)

HOST 100, 101 and 170

Fall 2011 (2 or more sections being offered)

HOST 152, 171, 290, 293

Spring 2012 (1 section being offered)

HOST 150, 154, 168, 256, 258,261, 265, 278 

At the completion of the spring 2012 semester, all fifteen of the HOST courses have had the course competencies completely assessed.

These course assessments gave us an opportunity to update our course competencies and to have a closer look at our methods of assessing these competencies. Several of our courses have or will be going through a curriculum review because of the results of these assessments. These course learning reports will continue to be a working document as we work on rubrics and additional assignments that can better assess the course competencies.  We will now create a 5-year time line and schedule to revisit these assessments.    

D) Assessment Strategy/Instrument

Assessment Strategy/Instrument

1. Internship supervisor assessmentof student performance: Students are required to intern a minimum of 225 hours before they receive their degree. The internship serves as a capstone experience. 

2. Student survey: Students completed a self reflective survey to rate their performance and learning.  

E) Results of Program Assessment

Program Assessment (as of spring 2012)

Program Name:  Hospitality and Tourism Education Department

Spring 2011

All 9 of the HOST’s Programs SLOs were assessed with 2 (7 & 8) determine as “NOT MET”

Fall 2011

HOST Program SLOs that were “NOT MET” (7 & 8) in the Spring 2011 assessment were re-assessed based on improvements made to activities, rubrics and measurements and were determine to have “MET EXPECTATIONS”

F) Other Comments

No content.

G) Next Steps

All fifteen of the HOST courses have had the course competencies completely assessed.

These course assessments gave us an opportunity to update our course competencies and will guide our continuing assessment of these competencies. Several of our courses have or will be going through a curriculum review because of the results of these assessments. These course learning reports will continue to be a working document as we develop rubrics and additional assignments that can better assess the course competencies.  We will now create a 5-year time line and schedule to revisit these assessments.    

Course Assessment Plan:

The program has developed fifteen Course Assessment Plans covering each of the HOST courses. A copy of the CAP’s can be found under resources in the HOST Department Laulima site. 

Course Learning Reports:

In March of 2012 the Program and Course Assessment Report was revised to include a column for program student learning outcomes and renamed the Course Learning Report.